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Oriental Index, by Date
 
 

Imaum






Gregory's Bay Arabian






Gregory's Grey Arabian






Wellesley Grey Arabian






Rockingham's Arabian













Willoughby Barb 1655c
 
 
Fairfax Morocco Barb 1665c, Helmsley Turk 1665c, Whiteshirt 1665c
 
 
Darcy's Chesnut Arabian 1670c, Dodsworth 1670c, Darcy's White Turk 1670c, Darcy's Yellow Turk 1670c, Place's White Turk 1670c, Sedbury Turk 1670c, Curwen's Arabian 1675c, Fenwick Barb 1675c, Pelham's Bay Arabian 1675c, Shaftesbury Turk 1675c, Spanker 1675c
 
 
Byerley Turk 1680c, Devonshire Arabian 1680c, Goring's Foreign Horse 1680c, Guise 1680c, Marshall Turk 1680c, Oglethorpe's Arabian 1680c, Selaby Turk 1680c, Curwen's Bay Barb 1681c, Pelham's Barb 1681c, Taffolet Barb 1681c, Leicester Turk 1682c, Lister Turk 1682c, Stradling Turk 1682c, Bay Roan 1685c, Cole's Barb 1685c, Gresley's Bay Arabian 1685c, Hales Barb 1685c, Hales Turk 1685c, Hautboy 1685c, Hutton's Royal Colt 1685c, Leedes Arabian 1685c, Little Barb 1685c, Lowther's White Legged Barb 1685c, Massey's Black Barb 1685c, Osberton Arabian 1685c, Pulleine's White Arabian 1685c, Rockwood 1685c
 
 
Burdett's Arabian 1690c, Curwen's Grey Morocco Barb 1690c, Curwen's Grey Turk 1690c, Hampton Court Brown Barb 1690c, Harpham Arabian 1690c, Harpur's Barb 1690c, Lambert Turk 1690c, Layton Grey Barb gr c 1690c, Lowther's Bay Barb 1690c, Pulleine's Chesnut Arabian 1690c, Wilkes's Barb 1690c, Wilkinson's Barb 1690c, Wilkinson's Bay Arabian 1690c, Wilkinson's Turk 1690c, Acaster Turk 1695c, Burlington Turk 1695c, Carlisle's Turk 1695c, Chillaby 1695c, Curwen's Chesnut Arabian 1695c, Darcy's Chesnut Arabian 1695c, Hampton Court Grey Barb 1695c, Honywood's Arabian 1695c, Hutton's Grey Barb 1695c, King William's Black Barb 1695c, King William's White Barb 1695c, No-Tongued Barb 1695c, Parsons's Barb 1695c, Rider's Chesnut Barb 1695c, St Victor's Barb 1695c, Thoulouse Barb 1695c, Wastell's Turk 1695c, Bassett Arabian 1697c, Newcastle Turk 1697c, Paget Arabian 1697c
 
 
Brownlow Turk 1700c, Conyers Arabian 1700c, Darley's Arabian 1700, Eley's Turk 1700c, Holderness Turk 1700c, Howe's Persian 1700c, Oysterfoot Arabian 1700c, Richmond's Turk 1700c, Richards Arabian 1700c, Stanyans Arabian 1700c, Williams's Turk 1700c, Woodstock Arabian 1700c, Harley's Arabian 1701c, Chesterfield Arabian 1703c, Chesterfield White Barb 1703c, Bridgewater Arabian 1705c, Cripple Barb 1705c, Crofts Bay Barb 1705c, Jenkins's Arabian 1705c, Little Mountain Barb 1705c, Rutland's Black Barb 1705c, Rutland's Grey Turk 1705c, Widdrington Grey Arabian 1705c, Hutton's White Turk 1708, Robinson's Barb 1708c
 
 
Crofts Egyptian 1710c, Cyprus Arabian 1710c, Gascoigne's Foreign Horse 1710c, Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian 1710c, Hampton Court Litton Arabian 1710c, Hutton's Bay Barb 1710c, Hutton's Bay Turk 1710c, Lexington Grey Arabian 1710c, Lord Perl 1710c, Mostyn Bay Barb 1710c, Oxford Dun Arabian 1710c, Pigot Turk 1710c, Portland's Arabian 1710c, Vernon's Barb 1710c, Wyvill's Golden Arabian 1710c, Alcock's Arabian 1712c, Belgrade Turk 1712c, Carlisle's Barb 1712c, Pelham's White Barb 1712c, Strickland's Turk 1712c, Bloody Shouldered Arabian 1713, Somerset's Arabian 1713, Blackett's Arabian 1715c, Brooke's Arabian 1715c, Chandos's Turk 1715c, Clifton Arabian 1715c, Devonshire Turk 1715c, Hall's Arabian 1715c, Hillsborough's Turk 1715c, Johnson's Arabian 1715c, Rooksby's Turk 1715c, Stahremberg Turk 1715c, Sutton's Grey Arabian 1715c, Sutton's Turk 1715c, Tarran's Black Barb 1715c, Lonsdale's Grey Arabian 1715c, Williams's Arabian 1720c, Wynn's Grey Arabian 1715c
 
 
Beckwith Arabian 1720c, Bloody Buttocks 1720c, Bethell's Arabian 1720c, Foreign Horse at Hampton Court 1720c, Hampton Court Grey Arabian 1720c, Harrison's Arabian 1720c, His Majesty's one-eyed Arabian 1720c, Hutton's Bay Arabian 1720c, King's Grey Arabian 1720c, Lonsdale's Arabian 1720c, Lonsdale's Bay Arabian 1720c, Lovel's Arabian 1720c, Lowther's Arabian 1720c, Milsington's Grey Arabian 1720c, Morgan's Arabian 1720c, Morgan's Black Barb 1720c, Morgan's Grey Barb 1720c, Newton's Bay Arabian 1720c, Newton's Grey Arabian 1720c, Orford Turk 1720c, Ovington's Grey Arabian 1720c, Thornton Arabian 1720c, Walpole Barb 1720c, Coke's Arabian 1724, Godolphin Arabian 1724, Beaufort Arabian 1725c, Newton's Arabian 1725c, Ancaster Arabian 1726, Lonsdale's Black Arabian 1725c, Matthews's Persian 1725c, Monkey 1725, Roan Barb 1725c
 
 
Fletcher's Arabian 1730c, Scawing's Arabian 1730c, Slit Ear'd Barb 1730c, Vane's Arabian 1730c, Ashridge Arabian 1735c, Bridgewater's Arabian 1735c, Bright's Arabian 1735c, Bright's Brown Turk 1735c, Cornwall's Arabian 1735c, Curzon's Grey Barb 1735c, Fawkener's Grey Turk 1735c, Newcastle Barb 1735c, Ogle's Barb 1735c, South Barb 1735c, Spanker 1735c, Tate's Arabian 1735c, Wilson's Arabian 1735c, Phillips's Grey Turk 1736c
 
 
Burlington's Persian 1740c, Crawford's Turk 1740c, Cullen Arabian br c 1740, Devonshire Chesnut Arabian 1740c, Godolphin Grey Barb 1740c, Hampton Court Black Arabian 1740c, Hampton Court Dun Barb 1740c, Morton's Arabian 1740c, Mosco's Grey Arabian1740c, Phillips's Arabian 1740c, Sebright's Arabian 1740c, Stamford's Turk 1740c, Trout's Arabian 1740c, Wilson's Bay Arabian 1740c, Godolphin Brown Barb 1743, Western Barb 1743, Ancaster Arabian 1745c, Brown's Arabian 1745c, Cumberland's Arabian 1745c, Devonshire Grey Arabian 1745c, March's Barb 1745c, Muley Ishmael 1745c, Orford Turk 1745c, Philipson's Turk 1745c, Phillips's Brown Turk 1745c, Tilney's Foreign Horse 1745c, Wheatly Turk 1745c, Wilson's Chesnut Arabian 1745c,  Wolseley Barb 1747c
 
 
Gower's Dun Barb 1750c, Hutton's Arabian 1750c, Hutton's Grey Barb 1750c, Northumberland's Golden Arabian 1750c, Orford Barb 1750c, Panton's Arabian 1750c, Shafto's Barb 1750c, Townshend's Barb 1750c, Swinburne's Arabian 1752c, Newcombe's Arabian 1753, Damascus Arabian 1754, Leedes's Arabian 1755, Northumberland's Brown Arabian 1755, Radcliffe's Arabian 1755c, Ward's Arabian 1755c, Belsize Arabian 1756
 
 
Ancaster Arabian 1760c, Barrington's Arabian 1760c, Bell's Arabian 1760c, Blair's Arabian 1760c, Bolingbroke's Arabian 1760c, Bolingbroke's Grey Arabian 1760c, Bond's Arabian 1760c, Bunbury's Arabian 1760c, Burlton's Arabian 1760c, Compton Barb 1760c, Coombe Arabian 1760c, Eaton Barb 1760c, Gibson's Grey Arabian 1760c, Grosvenor's Arabian 1760c, Jilfy Arabian 1760c, Martin's Black Arabian 1760c, Meadows's Barb 1760c, Northumberland's Arabian 1760c, Northumberland's Bay Arabian 1760c, Panton's Chesnut Arabian 1760c, Pigot Arabian 1760c, Rockingham's Arabian 1760c, Saanah Arabian 1760c, Sedley Arabian 1760c, Wastell's Turk 1760c, Cassilis Arabian 1761, Gregory's Arabian 1761c, Khalan Arabian 1761, Lindsey's Arabian 1762, Ranger 1762, Gregory's Grey Arabian 1763c, Rycote Arabian 1763c, Clement's Arabian 1764, Dowla 1764, Oxlade Arabian 1764, Bistern Arabian 1765c, Bolingbroke's Bay Arabian 1765c, Ferrers's Arabian 1765c, Milward's Arabian 1765c, Orlov Arabian 1765c, Ossory's Arabian 1765c, Shelley's Barb 1765c, Thompson's Grey Arabian 1765c, Vernon's Arabian 1765c, Ali Bey 1767c, Pembroke's Arabian 1767c, Percy's Bay Arabian 1767c, Count Orloff 1769c
 
 
Gray's Inn Arabian 1770c, Northumberland's Chesnut Arabian 1770c, Northumberland's Grey Arabian 1770c, Smith's Arabian 1770c, Sultan Mahomet 1770c, Witham Grey Arabian 1770c, Boringdon Arabian 1775c, Hadley's Arab 1775c, Parker's Arabian 1775c
 
 
Lovaine's Arabian 1780c, Pennington's Barb 1780c, Pensacola 1780c, Philippo's Arabian 1780c, Rumbold's Arabian 1780c, Rutland's Arabian 1780c, Ameer Arabian 1785c, Smith-Barry's Arabian 1785c
 
 
Arabian 1790c, Arcot Arabian 1790c, Cooke's Arabian 1790c, Sheik Twiney 1790c, Storey's Arabian 1790c, Winchilsea's Arabian 1790c, Woburn Arabian 1790c, Dey Of Algiers 1794, Egremont Barb 1795c, Forbes Arabian 1795c, Heathfield's Grey Arabian 1795c, Mansfield's Arabian 1795c, Patshull Arabian 1795c, Pigot Grey Arabian 1795c, Selim 1795c, Wellesley Grey Arabian 1796c, Wellesley Chesnut Arabian 1799c
 
 
Black Sultan 1800c, Cornwallis Arabian 1800c, Hector 1800c, Model 1800c, Coxe's Arabian 1810c, Sheik 1810c, Bagdad 1815c, Harborough's Arabian 1815c, Satellite 1815c, Shebdeez 1815c, Mariner 1820c, The Caliph 1825c, Daghee 1829, Sepoy 1835c, Abdallah 1840c, Ackbar 1841, Imaum 1845c, Pegasus 1860c
 
Oriental Index, by Name
   
Abdallah
c 1840c. Said to be an Arabian he stood in Australia. His most significant offspring was his daughter Clanfoergal (f 1850c) the taproot mare of Colonial Family c42.
 
 
Acaster Turk
[Akaster Turk, Carlisle Turk] (gr c1695). Sire Line Acaster Turk.
 
 
Ackbar
c 1841. Said to be an Arabian imported into New South Wales from India he sired Twinkle (b f 1851) the taproot mare of Colonial Family c58 as well as the stallion Lambuscat (c 1850c).
 
 
Alcock's Arabian (GB)
[Widdrington Grey Arabian, Pelham's White Barb, Pelham's White Turk, Bridgewater Arabian] gr c 1712c (Curwen's Bay Barb - Old Wen Mare, by Hautboy). Sire Line Curwen's Bay Barb. Family 11.
 
 
Ali Bey
[Pembroke's Arabian, Percy's Arabian] bbr c 1767c. Ali Bey was said to have been given to Count Alexey Grigoryevich Orlov (1737-1808), commander-in-chief of the fleet sent by Her Imperial Majesty of Russia against the Turks, by the governor of Arabia Felix. Said by the governor to be the most precious thing in his power to give, Ali Bey joined the Orlov stud near Moscow. In 1778 the Count presented the horse to Lord Herbert, son of Henry Herbert (1734-1794), 10th Earl of Pembroke, whilst the former was on his "Grand Tour" with travelling companion Reverend (later Archdeacon) William Coxe. Orlov advised in a letter that this "brown bay horse was presented to me by Aley Bay; he is a true Arabian, and actually of the Cochlean Race". He was described as a deep blood bay standing 14 hands 2 inches exactly, without shoes, having great bone, being perfectly sound, and of the highest racing blood. Whilst owned by Lord Pembroke Ali Bey covered at Mr Daniel's at Newmarket and at Wilton, Wiltshire, for a fee of 2gs rising to 3gs. He then passed into the hands of Algernon Percy (1750-1830), 1st Earl of Beverley, who, as second son of the 1st Duke of Northumberland, was called Lord Percy from 1766 to 1786. He left about seven unnamed offspring, most of whom did not run or breed on. However, two of his daughters enjoyed some success in the stud. (1) One of his daughters was the second dam of the stallion Eryx (b c 1816) who sired Brandy Ann (ch f 1826), ancestress of such horses as Gimcrack Stakes winner King Olaf (b c 1875 Kingcraft) and Gran Premio Jose Pedro Ramirez winner Maron (gr c 1922 St Wolf). Eryx also got the dam of the Prix du Jockey Club and Prix de Diane winner Lanterne (b f 1841 Hercule). (2) Another daughter was the second dam of the York Royal Plate winner Sweetwilliam (b c 1803 St George). Sweetwilliam was the damsire of Maeonides (b c 1830 Catton), sent to Australia, who in turn was the damsire of the New Zealand bred Dainty Ariel (b c 1857 Riddlesworth). Dainty Ariel sired the second dam of Richochet* (br f 1883 Musket) who was sent to America and there founded a small family of runners which included Harry Payne Whitney's Ladies Handicap winner Yankee Girl (b f 1904 Sir Dixon), she the second dam of his Preakness Stakes winner Bostonian (bl c 1924 Broomstick), and the fourth dam of the Ascot Gold Vase winner Faux Pas (bl c 1948 Mieuxce). Faux Pas, acquired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, sired a black mare named Burmese who was presented to Queen Elizabeth II in 1969 and used by Her Majesty as a ceremonial mount.
 
 
Ameer Arabian
c 1785c. Owned by Mr Storey, his daughter Ameer Arabian Mare (f 1795c) met with an accident when suckling Lysander (ch c 1805 Stride) and died in consequence [GSB 2 2nd ed1832]. Lysander started for the Gold Cup at Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1808 won by Mr G Hutton's Cardinal York (br c 1804 Sir Peter Teazle). The Storey family owned and raced a number of horses in the latter part of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th century. There are perhaps three generations of the Storey family represented in the early days of the stud book. Peter Storey purchased Creeper (b c 1744 Young Belgrade) at the conclusion of his turf career from Sir Marmaduke Wyvill. Mr Storey bred racehorses from 1795c to 1808 including the second, third and fourth dams of the Derby winners St. Giles (ch c 1829 Tramp) and Bloomsbury (b c 1836 Mulatto). Mr Storey also owned the stallion Cramlington (b c 1803 Pipator) and from him William bred the stallion Sober Robin (b c 1819 Cramlington).
 
 
Ancaster Arabian (GB)
[Routh's Crab] gr c 1726 (Wynn's Arabian - Young Peg, by Old Pert). Sire Line Wynn's Arabian. Family 14. One of the Ancaster Arabians was the subject of a painting. On a canvas 3 ft by 2 ft Seymour shows how the Duke of Bridgewater's bay horse, Hazard, beat the Duke of Ancaster's grey Arab, each horse carrying 9 stone [British Sporting Artists, 74]. This horse can be identified from Baily's Racing Register. He was bred by Cuthbert Routh and was probably the Crab sent to Virginia around 1737 where he covered at Secretary John Carter's Shirley stud in Charles City County. He appears in the pedigrees of Grey John (gr c 1775c), Young Paul Jones (b c 1789) and Ridgely's Syphon (b c 1795).
 
 
Ancaster Arabian
c 1745c. Owned by Peregrine Bertie (1714-1778), 3rd Duke of Ancaster, a member of the Jockey Club and Master of the Horse to George III, the Arabian was one of several horses with this name. It is possible that he later became Panton's Arabian (gr c 1750c). He sired Ancaster Arabian Mare (b f 1752) whilst in the Duke's stud, however she left no known offspring.
 
 
Ancaster Arabian
gr c 1760c. Also one of the Ancaster Arabians in the stud of the 3rd Duke he sired Sir Charles Bunbury's Muslin (gr f 1769), the latter a half sister to the legendary Highflyer (b c 1774 King Herod), however she left no known offspring in the stud book.
 
 
Arabian
c 1790c. He is recorded in the General Stud Book as an anonymous Arabian, sire of the Margrave of Anspach's colt (ch c 1799) from Augusta (ch f 1784 Eclipse). The latter was bred by HRH the Prince of Wales and sold to Mr O'Kelly for 2800 guineas "with engagements" in 1786 [GSB 1:229]. Christian Frederick Charles Alexander, Margrave of Brandenburg, Anspach and Bareith, Duke of Prussia and Count of Sayn married the widow of William Craven, 6th Earl of Craven, shortly after the latter's demise and settled at Brandenburg House, Hammersmith and Benham, Berkshire where he remained until his death in 1806. The Margrave owned or bred several other racehorses including Young Sir Peter (b c 1799 Sir Peter Teazle).
 
 
Arcot Arabian
gr c 1790c. Obtained by the Nabob of Arcot from Mecca "at an immense expense" he was then presented to HM King George III (1738-1820). Said to be unrivalled for beauty, strength and activity with a small head and a "lively, animated countenance" he stood 15 hands. He later covered in Hertfordshire at Delrow Farm, Aldenham for a fee of 35 guineas. He sired Mr Kingman's Ameer (b c 1796), G Villiers Nutmeg (gr c 1796) and several unnamed mares none of whom left any offspring in the stud book.
 
 
Ashridge Arabian
c 1735c. Scroop Egerton (1681-1745), 1st Duke of Bridgewater, held the position of Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire and offices within the household of Prince George of Denmark, Consort to Queen Anne. His principal seat was in Hertfordshire at Ashridge. The Duke maintained a modest racing stable comprised of less than 10 horses from around 1710 until his death thirty-five years later. Some of his better known horses include Ashridge Ball (c 1711c Leedes), Bridgewater Star (c 1725 Ashridge Ball), and Hazard ( b c 1726 Leedes). The Ashridge Arabian sired only one known offspring, the Duke's Ashridge Arabian Mare (f 1743), the dam of Mr Adcock's Lizard (gr c 1750 Ancaster Starling) and his sisters, one of whom was owned by Sir John Moore and the other by Mr Barton. Lizard ran for the Duke of Ancaster in 1754 finishing 4th for the Royal Plate at Ipswich won by W Crofts's Brilliant (bu c 1750 Crab), and 2nd for a fifty at Lincoln won by Mr Warren's Basto. Running for Mr Adcock finished 2nd for a fifty at Barnet in 1755 won by Mr Leeson's Squirt, finished 3rd for a fifty at Bueford won by Mr Cornwall's Redstreak (b c 1750 Regulus), won a fifty at Enfield beating Mr Beaver's Hercules (b c Look-About-Ye) and 6 others, finished 4th for a fifty at Newark won by Mr Robinson's good mare Musick (gr f 1750 Croft's Forester), lost a match for 40 gs at Newmarket in 1756 to Mr Chamberlain's Ruby (b c 1750 Janus), finished 7th for a fifty at Barnet won by Mr Boothby's Grantham (ch c 1749 Young Starling) and finished 6th of 6 for a fifty at Hounslow.
 
 
Bagdad
br c 1815c. Brought from Aleppo to Tripoli and then sent to England by Hassana d'Gris, ambassador of the Bashaw of Tripoli to England, Bagdad was said to be a horse of the purest Arabian blood, to stand 1/4 inch shy of 15 hands, and to have a generally nice shape although he was perhaps a bit light in the quarters. Mr d'Gris stated that he was one of twelve Arabians that had travelled from Aleppo to Marseilles in 1819, of which six became the property of the French government and six remained with d'Gris. He further stated that he had refused £1000 for him in France and that of his six horses Bagdad was his favourite and by far the most valuable. He was purchased by the London merchant George Barclay and sent to New York in the spring of 1823. He covered at Woodbridge, New Jersey in the hands of Dr Freeman. From there he was sold to the Bagdad Company of Nashville, Tennessee for $8000 and covered from 1824 to 1834 in the care of Thomas Martin on Gallatin Road near Nashville. In 1834 he moved to Thomas Alderson's in Nashville which is the last record of him. He got several runners in Tennessee and according to Mr Williams, a member of the Bagdad Company, that despite the general preference for the get of Sir Archy (b c 1805 Diomed) or Jackson's Pacolet (gr c 1808 Citizen) that was prevalent at the time even those sportsmen conceded that the get of Bagdad, in particular Confederate, displayed high form and polish.
 
 
Barrington's Arabian 1760c
See Gibson's Grey Arabian.
 
 
Basset Arabian
[Paget Arabian] c 1700c. Sire Line Basset Arabian.
 
 
Bay Roan
[Gresley's Bay Arabian] b c 1685c. Owned by Sir Thomas Gresley (1628c-1699), 2nd Bt of Drakelow, Derbyshire whose mother was Bridget, the daughter of Sir Thomas Burdett, he got Robert Burdett's Old Child Mare (f 1690c) one of the foundation mares of Family 32.
 
 
Beaufort Arabian
gr c 1725c. He was owned by Henry Somerset (1707-1745), 3rd Duke of Beaufort, sometime owner of several important horses including Old Standard (b c 1736 Young Belgrade) and Babraham (b c 1738 Godolphin Arabian). Beaufort Arabian got the dam of the brothers Hamilton's Figure (gr c 1747 Old Standard) and Jason (gr c 1749 Old Standard). Beaufort Arabian Mare (gr f 1740c) is one of the foundation mares of Family 102.
 
 
Beckwith Arabian
b c 1720c. Owned in Yorkshire by Thomas Beckwith at High Burton, near Bedale he was imported by Benjamin Bodington, an "eminent Turkey merchant". Said to be a beautiful "natural ginse Arabian" he stood 14 and a half hands and was "proportionably strong". He covered for a fee of two guineas. He got the dam of the Ancaster Pilot (ch c 1744 Roundhead) who won a fifty at Lichfield in 1748.
 
 
Belgrade Turk
bbr c 1712c. Sire Line Belgrade Turk.
 
 
Bell's Arabian
gr c 1760c. Owned by the anonymous Mr Bell he was the sire of nearly twenty offspring in the stud book from around 1765 to 1775. Although he was patronised by mares of some quality none of his offspring bred on. His most successful runners include the Duke of Northumberland's Ticklepitcher (gr c 1770) winner of a 200 gs match from the Duke of Bolton's Crab at Newmarket Second October in 1774, the Duke of Bolton's Cobscar (b c 1769) winner of a 100 gs match from Lord Essex's Malden at York in 1772 and a £50 plate at Winchester in 1773, Lord Clermont's Bellissimo (b c 1770) winner of a fifty at Wisbech in 1775 and Mr Bethell's Harlequin (gr c 1771) winner of a fifty at Boroughbridge in 1776.
 
 
Belsize Arabian
gr c 1756. Said to have been bred by the Governor of Wazan in Morocco his sire was an Arabian and his dam was described as "one of the most beloved mares in the Emperor's Stud". Purchased by Jonathan Welch he was sent to England in 1759 where he stood for seven years. In England he sired both Stirling* gr c 1762) and Sylva* (gr f 1765). He was purchased by Admiral Sir Charles Saunders in 1775. Thought to be the first authentic Oriental stallion to come to America he arrived in Pennsylvania in 1766. Described by the Pennsylvania Chronicle in 1768 as having been much admired by the best judges for his beautiful form and carriage, he was said to be a silver-grey with a black mane standing nearly sixteen hands. His beauty coupled with his size and strength made him an admirable sire of riding and carriage stock. Before leaving England he got the racehorse Granby* (b c 1762) who appears in the pedigree of Thora (b f 1880 by Longfellow). William Evans of Surrey County, Virginia imported Stirling* and Silver* (Sylva) who when mated produced the matriarch Sally Painter (gr f 1769c) the tail-female ancestress of Count Fleet (br c 1940 Reigh Count). Belsize Arabian stood in Pennsylvania until 1768.
 
 
Bethell's Arabian
gr c 1720c. Owned by Hugh Bethell (d 1752), high sheriff of Yorkshire, whose family seats were at Rise Hall in Holderness and Watton Abbey Bethell's Arabian got many good runners however his most notable offspring was probably Salome (bl f 1733) who ran 2nd for the Royal Plate at Hambleton in 1738 and won 90 gs at Lincoln in 1739. One of the foundation mares of Family 26 she was the second dam of the legendary King Herod (b c 1758 Tartar). She was also the third dam of the Oaks winner Tetotum (b f 1777 Matchem) and Alderman* (b c 1787 Pot8os). Alderman* was sent to Virginia where he became the broodmare sire of Sister to Tuckahoe (ch f 1814 by Ball's Florizel), the dam of Boston (ch c 1833 Timoleon).
 
 
Bistern Arabian
b c 1765c. He covered at Bisterne, near Ringwood, Hampshire from 1774 to 1777 for a fee of five guineas, possibly following in the hoofprints of Marske (br c 1750 Squirt). He sired one stud book entry, Colonel Lechmere's Bistern Arabian Mare (b f 1774) from HRH the Duke of Cumberland's Miss Windsor (b f 1754 Godolphin Arabian) however she does not appear to have had any offspring.
 
 
Blackett's Arabian
c 1715c. Owned by Sir William Blackett (1690c-1728), 2nd Bt of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, who owned several runners in the early part of the eighteenth century including the match winner Blacklegs (c 1705c Thoulouse Barb) and the plate winners Bagpiper (ch c 1706c Thoulouse Barb) and Bold Thirkeld (b g 1719c). Blackett Arabian's most notable offspring was perhaps the dam of the Hambleton Royal Plate winner Aquilina (ch f 1732 Bartlet's Childers) owned by Mr Hutton.
 
Black Sultan
bl c 1800. Said to be a Barb he was sent to Thomas Jefferson, the President of the United States, by the Bey of Tunis in 1806. His ambassador Melli Melli accompanied Black Sultan and two Barb mares, and all were said to have been selected with great care and expense from the highest bred horses of Tunis. Black Sultan stood 16 hands and was described as "leggy as a mountain Arab" with superb conformation. After Melli Melli departed both were sold for the benefit of the U S Treasury. Black Sultan stood his first season with John Tayloe II, going to Elias Earle in South Carolina in 1807, and to John Gallant in 1808. One Barb mare was sent to Louisiana and produced Beau Laquaise (c 1807), and no further infomation is known about either. The other Barb mare went to Jefferson's son-in-law John Eppes who was also a member of Congress. She was sent to Virginia where she foaled Sultana (f 1807c). This Barb mare was then bred to Citizen (b c 1785 Pacolet) and produced a foal (f 1810c) that would become know as The Citizen Mare, the taproot of American Family A30. Sultana produced Lady Burton (b f 1813 by Sir Archy) who was said by Bruce to be one of the best broodmares America has ever produced.
 
 
Blair's Arabian
c 1760c. His single stud book offspring is the Blair Arabian Colt (br c 1769) owned by Mr Baily.
 
 
Bloody Buttocks
[Thornton Arabian, Newton's Grey Arabian] gr c 1720c. The General Stud Book notes that "nothing further can be traced from the papers of the late Mr Crofts, than that he was a Grey Arabian, with a red mark on his hip, from whence he derived his name" [GSB 1:393]. The Turf Register says he was bred by Mr Crofts and was a favourite stallion in his stud at Barforth although "neither his Sire or Dam has as yet been given to the Public; notwithstanding, he was sire of several Brood-Mares from whom have descended some very speedy and excellent Racers" [Pick 1:227]. He was advertised for sale as part of the stud of William Ovington of Cowling, near Bedale, in 1727, and was said to have been purchased by John Crofts and Mr Hartley. A later Turf Register noted that he covered at Barforth for 5gs a mare and bore the nickname "the Speedy Stallion" [Johnson 3:161]. Thornton's Arabian Bloody Buttocks was mentioned as a sire in the list of horses belonging to the stud of Sir Michael Newton in 1731 and Highflyer has shown that he is the same horse as Sir Michael's Newton's Grey Arabian. He sired nearly fifty offspring recorded in the stud book notably Bay Bloody Buttocks (b f 1729) one of the foundation mares of Family 4, Dairymaid (f 1737) the ancestress of the taproot mares of Family 23-a and Family 23-b, Bloody Buttocks Mare (f 1735c) the taproot mare of Family 66 and Grey Brocklesby (gr f 1728) third dam of Gimcrack (gr c 1760 Cripple) and ancestress of the Kentucky Derby winner Ponder (b c 1946 Pensive) and the St Leger winner Cambremer (ch c 1953 Chamossaire). Bloody Buttocks is said to have died at Barforth about the year 1737, and to have been buried in the paddock near Partner and Greyhound.
 
 
Bloody Shouldered Arabian
[Oxford's, Somerset's] gr c 1713. Sire Line Bloody Shouldered Arabian.
 
 
Bolingbroke's Arabian
c 1760c. It is possible that he is the same horse as either the Coombe Arabian (Bolingbroke's Grey Arabian) or the Bolingbroke Bay Arabian. He is the sire of three unnamed colts in the stud book. Frederick St John (1732-1789), 2nd Viscount Bolingbroke of Lydiard Park near Swindon, Wiltshire bred and raced a great many horses for several decades in the second half of the eighteenth century. Among others he owned the legendary Highflyer (b c 1774 King Herod) at one time, the good racemare Molly Long Legs (b f 1753 Babraham) the ancestress of much of Family 6-a, the racehorse Protector (br c 1770 Matchem) and Maria (b f 1777 King Herod) the dam of Waxy (b c 1790 Pot8os).
 
 
Bolingbroke's Bay Arabian
b c 1765c. His one offspring recorded in the stud book is Lord Milsington's Pink (ch c 1773). Pink ran at Newmarket in 1778 winning a 100 gs match from Mr Pigot's Bagatelle (b f 1774 Chrysolite) and a 40 gs match from Sir Charles Bunbury's Whirlwind (b c 1773 Bellario).
 
 
Bond's Arabian 1760c
See Martin's Black Arabian.
 
 
Boringdon Arabian
[Parker's Arabian] c 1775c. Owned by HRH the Prince of Wales he was purchased at the Prince's sale in 1786 by Mr Edwards for 12 guineas. His only offspring recorded in the stud book was Mr Parker's Boringdon Arabian Mare (gr f 1781) from Virago (gr f 1765 Snap), the latter was also the dam of Saltram (br c 1780 Eclipse). Virago was bred by John Parker (1735-1788), 1st Baron Boringdon, whose seat was at Saltram House in Devon, and sold to the Prince of Wales which perhaps illustrates Mr Parker's interest in acquiring her daughter. She had however no further offspring entered in the stud book, although she was recorded as bringing 33 guineas "covered by Anvil" in a list of broodmares sold by HRH the Prince of Wales in 1792. Under the name of Parker's Arabian he got the Prince of Wales's Plenipo (b c 1783) and his unnamed sister (b f 1780). Neither of these appear to have any further record.
 
 
Bridgewater's Arabian
[Widdrington Grey Arabian] gr c 1705c (Lister's Turk - Dam of Coneyskins). Sire Line Lister Turk. William (1678-1743), 4th Baron Widdrington of Blankney, whose seat was at Widdrington Castle in Northumberland, married Jane Tempest in 1700 and thereafter lived mainly at Stella Hall. A staunch Catholic, whose part in the Jacobite uprising of 1715 cost him his titles and estates, perhaps parted with his Arabian at this time. The horse passed into the hands of Mr Bridgewater for whom he sired Mr Jackson's Grizzle (gr c 1726) the 3rd place finisher for the King's Plate at Ipswich in 1731 won by Mr Dodsworth's good runner Midge (gr c 1724 Jigg). He also got Thomas Bridgewater's Young Brisk (c 1720c) who was sometimes called Bridgewater's Horse. Young Brisk was described as a strong well-fashioned horse standing 15 hands and half an inch. He covered at Tuddo near Durham for a fee of half a guinea. Young Brisk sired Mr Jackson's Favourite (gr f 1725) the famous mare who won six King's Plates and Mr Jackson's Little John (gr c 1726) who won a plate at Morpeth in 1730.
 
 
Bridgewater's Arabian
b c 1735c. Owned by Scroop Egerton (1681-1744), 1st Duke of Bridgewater, he was described as a strong "full-siz'd" horse who was perfectly sound and free from blemish. In 1746 he covered in Staffordshire for proprietor John Walford of Wolverhampton for a fee of 1 guinea. His only known offspring was a chesnut colt of 1745 foaled in the Godolphin stud and sold to Charles Adams in 1747.
 
 
Bright's Arabian
c 1735c. Owned in Yorkshire by Thomas Bright (d 1737) of Badsworth near Pontrefact he sired four offspring who were recorded in the stud book. The most successful of these was Mr Bright's Partner (br c 1746) winner of a fifty at Wakefield and several other prizes in the north of England. Mary Bright, daughter of Thomas, married Charles Watson-Wentworth (1730-1782), 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, in 1752.
 
 
Bright's Brown Turk
br c 1735c. Possibly the same horse as Bright's Arabian, he got the dam of Bewdley Billy (b c 1755 Regulus). Bred by Edward Rookes Leedes, Bewdley Billy was described as a well marked bay who "goes well on his legs". He was previously called Merry Andrew and ran for Mr Tattersall at Stamford and Aylesbury in 1759 without success. He was advertised to cover in Worcestershire in 1760 at a fee of half a guinea.
 
 
Brooke's Arabian
c 1715c. His owner was possibly Francis Greville (1719-1773), who was known as Lord Brooke from 1727 to 1746, after which he became the 1st Earl of Warwick. He sired only one offspring in the stud book, Brooke Arabian Mare (f 1730c) who was the grandam of Hamilton's Figure (gr c 1747 Old Standard) and Jason (gr c 1749 Old Standard). It is possible that this Arabian was known by another name at another time.
 
 
Brownlow Turk
c 1700c. Sire Line Brownlow Turk. He was probably owned by Sir John Brownlow (1690-1754), 5th Bt of Humby, and in 1718 Baron Charleville and Viscount Tyrconnel in Ireland. Peregrine Bertie (1686-1742), 2nd Duke of Ancaster, married Jane Brownlow and named one of his sons Brownlow Bertie. The Turk, sire of Grey Grantham (gr c 1714) and his brother (gr c 1710c), is often cited as the source of modern day grey colour in the thoroughbred racehorse, however the grey may have originated with Grey Grantham's dam, who is otherwise unidentified.
 
 
Brown's Arabian
c 1745c. Owned by Mr Brown of Dublin he arrived in Gibraltar from Tangier in April of 1750 and thence travelled to London in May and Ireland in July. He was first advertised in 1752 to cover in Yorkshire at Mr Green's near Bedale and in 1753 to cover in Dublin. He was described in his advertisements as strong, beautiful and nimble and standing fifteen hands. His elaborate pedigree was also published which indicated that he was bred in the Royal stud of the Emperor of Morocco and was of the "Royal Arabian Sharrif-Breed". He sired an unnamed daughter, described as a grey spotted filly [Royal Studs:181] from Wagtail (b f 1732 Godolphin's Whitefoot) both owned in Ireland by the Earl of Antrim. Mr Brown was probably John Browne (d 1776), created Baron Monteagle in 1760, Viscount Westport in 1768 and Earl of Altamont in 1771.
 
 
Bunbury's Arabian
c 1760c. Owned by Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury (1740-1821), 6th Bt of Bunbury and Stanney, resident of Barton, Suffolk, the Arabian is otherwise unidentified. Sir Charles is probably best known as the owner of Diomed (ch c 1777 Florizel) the first Derby winner. Bunbury's Arabian sired three fillies recorded in the stud book from 1766 to 1772 however none of these left recorded offspring.
 
 
Burdett's Arabian
[Harpham Arabian] c 1690c. Owned by Robert Burdett he may have been the same horse as Harpur's Barb and the Harpham Arabian. The Burdett family lived near Calke Abbey in Derbyshire, the seat of the Harpurs. Burdett's Arabian sired Young Child Mare, bred by Robert Burdett (1670-1716), who married Elizabeth Tracy, daughter of William, 4th Viscount Tracy. The latter owned the famous mare Whimsey, who was also bred by Burdett out of the Young Child Mare.
 
 
Burlington's Persian
c 1745c. He was owned by Richard Boyle (1694-1753), 3rd Earl of Burlington and 4th Earl of Cork, who was also one of the owners of the Thoulouse Barb (b c 1695c). Burlington held office as Lord Treasurer of Ireland, Lord Lieutenant of the East and West Ridings of Yorkshire, and Privy Councillor whilst maintaining an passion for architecture. The Persian was the sire of the Duke of Devonshire's unnamed filly (gr f 1752) from Young Miss Belvoir (gr f 1730 Childers), however there is no further record of her.
 
 
Burlington Turk 1695c
See Thoulouse Barb.
 
 
Burlton's Arabian
gr c 1760c. Philip Burlton (d 1790), an army surgeon, bred and raced horses for nearly forty years in the latter half of the eighteenth century and claimed the Oaks Stakes in 1784 with his homebred Stella (b f 1781 Plunder). Described as an "exceeding bony fine Horse" that "gets good Stock" Burlton's Arabian covered in Essex at Wickham Mills, near Witham for a fee of £10. His only offspring recorded in the stud book was Mr Burlton's Squib (gr c 1768) from Sister to Mirza (b f 1751 Godolphin Arabian). Squib ran at Newmarket in 1771 defeating Lord Orford's Atheist (gr c 1768 Bell's Arabian) in a match for 100 guineas. There is a possibility that Burlton's Arabian was the same horse as the Witham Grey Arabian.
 
 
Byerley Turk
bl c 1680c. Sire Line Byerley Turk.
 
 
Carlisle Barb [Strickland Turk]
bl c 1712c. Sire Line Strickland Turk.
 
 
Carlisle Turk [Acaster Turk]
gr c 1695c. Sire Line Acaster Turk.
 
 
Cassilis Arabian
c 1761. The Cassilis Arabian probably belonged to Sir Thomas Kennedy (1730c-1775) who succeeded as 9th Earl of Cassilis in 1762. His seat at Culzean Castle on the Ayshire coast of Scotland was known for its panoramic vistas of the Firth of Clyde and overlooked the isles of Arran, Bute and Ailsa Craig as well as the mull of Kintyre. The Cassilis Arabian was brought for the earl from Smyrna by Dr Turnbull and was valued around six hundred pounds sterling on his arrival. Advertisements describe him as a "beautiful cream-coloured" horse who stood 14 hands 3 inches and was "remarkably active and strong, perfectly sound" and quiet enough to carry a lady. He was offered at auction in April of 1772 at the stables of Peter Ramsay of Cowgate Port, Edinburgh. He got several colts who ran at York in the early 1770s although his most notable offspring was Mr Sitlington's Acropolis (b c 1769) who was later known as Mr Bacon's Foxhunter. One of his unnamed daughters won a 500 guineas match at York in 1772 beating Lord Bolingbroke's Philippo (gr c 1768 Coombe Arabian). He also got Mr Blake's Tabby Runt (b f 1770) from Miss South, the latter the dam of Trentham (b c 1766 Gower's Sweepstakes).
 
 
Chandos's Turk
c 1715c. Sire Line Chandos' Turk. James Brydges (1673-1744), 1st Duke of Chandos and Marquess of Carnarvon, was a member of parliament from 1698 to 1714 and held the office of paymaster general of forces abroad. He built the imposing Canons Park, near Edgeware, Middlesex, and enjoyed Handel as his resident composer. Having lost his fortune, the original Canons was demolished around 1744 and parts of it were sold to reduce his debt. Another residence was erected later, presumably that which was home to the relative of Dennis O'Kelly, who was custodian of Eclipse (ch c 1764 Marske) in his final years. The Duke's father, James, 8th Lord Chandos of Sudeley, was ambassador at Constantinople and may have arranged the purchase of the Turk, or he may have been acquired through the Duke's son, the Honourable and Reverend Henry Brydges, a friend of Thomas Darley. In a letter written from Aleppo in 1705 Thomas informs his brother John that he has requested Henry Brydges to accompany the Darley Arabian to England on the ship Ipswich. In the stud the Chandos' Turk left the Royal Plate winner Mr Shepherd's Dashwood (b c 1727). In 1732 Dashwood won the Royal Plate at Ipswich, beating Mr Panton's Leadenheels (b c 1725 Childers), Lord Halifax's Robin (b c 1727 King's Grey Arabian), Sir M Newton's Brisk and three others in three heats. In the second heat, having run off course about 600 yards, he was hard put to save his distance, which he nevertheless managed to do, and won the third heat "easy". He also placed third in the Ladies' Plate at York, won by Captain Appleyard's Quiet Cuddy (ch c 1727 Fox), followed by Sir M Newton's Brisk, beating Mr Read's Sampson, Mr Hutton's Grey Childers (br c 1727 Bartlet's Childers) and ten others.
 
 
Chesterfield Arabian
[Chesterfield White Barb] gr c 1703c. He was probably owned by Philip Stanhope (1633-1713), 2nd Earl of Chesterfield. His only known offspring is the dam of Lord Portmore's Royal Plate winner Highlander (gr c 1742 Portmore's Victorious) who was said to stand 14 hands 1 inch and to be "one of the best horses of his size that ever won a royal plate". Highlander was later a stallion at Hampton Court. Lord Chesterfield also owned the Stanhope mare of Family 32 who was the dam of Lord Godolphin's Sophy (b c 1729 Matthew's Persian). It is conceivable that the Chesterfield Arabian is the same horse as the Chesterfield White Barb who covered six mares in the Newcastle Stud in 1708 [Early Records: 116].
 
 
Chillaby 1695c.
 
 
Clement's Arabian 1764
See Dowla.
 
 
Clifton Arabian
c 1715c. He was possibly the same horse as Johnson's Arabian. He may have been Mr Metcalfe's "fine grey Barb of uncommon strength, size and beauty" who covered at Clifton, near York, for a fee of 2 guineas. His single stud book offspring, the Clifton Arabian Mare (f 1730c), a foundation mare of Family 57, was the ancestress of Mr Edwards Irish stallions Buffer (b c 1798 Prizefighter), Escape (ch c 1802 Commodore) and Rugantino (ch c 1803 Commodore).
 
 
Coke's Arabian 1724
 
 
Cole's Barb
c 1685c. The Barb was probably owned by Sir Ralph Cole (d 1704) of Brancepeth Castle who represented Durham in several post-Restoration parliaments and was cousin to Sir Ralph Milbanke. Cole's Barb got Old Smithson (bbr c 1695c) whose daughter was the second dam of Hobgoblin (br c 1724 Aleppo). Old Smithson belonged to John Milbanke (d 1713) of Thorp Perrow, Yorkshire, whose wife Dorothy was a sister of Sir Ralph Milbank (1689-1748), 4th Bt of Halnaby, owner of the famous Milbanke's Black Mare (bl f 1710c Makeless) the dam of Hartley's Blind Horse (ch c 1712c Holderness Turk).
 
 
Compton Barb 1760c
See Sedley Arabian.
 
 
Conyers Arabian 1700c
 
 
Cooke's Arabian 1790c
See Sheikh Twiney.
 
 
Coombe Arabian
[Combe Arabian, Pigot Arabian, Bolingbroke Grey Arabian] gr c 1760c. According to the General Stud Book "The COOMBE ARABIAN (sometimes called the Pigot Arabian, and sometimes the Bolingbroke Grey Arabian), was the sire of Methodist, the dam of Crop, etc." [GSB 1:393]. George Pigot (1719-1777) was created Baronet in 1764 after his return to England and Baron Pigot of Patshull in Dublin in 1766. After an career with the East India Company he represented Wallingford and later Bridgenorth in parliament and is said to have paid £100,00 for the Patshull estate in Staffordshire. Under the name of the Pigot Arabian the horse covered in Huntingdonshire, at Chesterton Hall near Stilton, in 1770 and 1771 for a fee of 10 guineas. A later Pigot Grey Arabian (gr c 1795c) covered at Patshull in the early 1800s. There is no explanation for the name Coombe (or Combe). The word coombe, meaning a small valley or a hollow, is commonly used in the south of England but has no known connection with this Arabian. Nevertheless under the name of the Coombe Arabian he covered in Northamptonshire at Pooksley-Green from 1772 to 1776 whilst his fee declined from 10 guineas to 5 guineas. Frederick St John (1732-1789), 2nd Viscount Bolingbroke of Lydiard Park near Swindon, Wiltshire was a notable turf supporter in the second half of the seventeenth century and more than one Arabian carries his name. It is possible that the Bolingbroke Grey Arabian is the same horse as the otherwise unidentified Bolingbroke Arabian. Having been fairly well patronised the Coombe Arabian had over 25 offspring perhaps the most famous of whom was Methodist (gr c 1768) the winner of numerous matches and the King's Plate at Newmarket for Lord Orford in 1771. None of his sons bred on. One of his daughters (gr f 1768) had more success, she being the ancestress of the Preis der Diana winner La Stella (b f 1863 Mountain Deer).
 
 
Cornwallis Arabian
c 1800c. He was possibly owned by Charles Cornwallis (1738-1805), 1st Marquess of Cornwallis and probably covered at Hampton Court during the reign of King George III (1738-1820). He sired an unnamed colt (ch c 1813) belonging to Mr Boultbee and the Mount Falcon Arabian (gr c 1810c) belonging to John-Frederic Knox of Mount Falcon, high sheriff of Mayo and Sligo. The Mount Falcon Arabian was from an Arabian mare who was presented to Charles Dillon-Lee (1745-1813), 12th Viscount Dillon, of Quarendon, Buckinghamshire, by King George. Lord Dillon later gave him to Mr Knox. The Mount Falcon Arabian died in Ireland in 1832.
 
 
Cornwall's Arabian
c 1735c. Owned by Velters Cornwall, turf supporter and owner of the good runner Jason (gr c 1749 Old Standard) and the stallion Blind Spot (gr c 1735c Chaplin's Spot), he sired only one stud book entry, Mr Brooks's Rainbow (ch c 1752) who won fifties at Chipping-Norton in 1756 and at Tetbury and Northampton in 1757.
 
 
Count Orloff
b c 1769c. Presented to Sir Horatio Mann (1744-1814), 2nd bt Mann, by Count Alexey Grigoryevich Orlov, who maintained an extensive stud in Russia, Count Orloff was described as bay Arabian of the highest racing blood, of great bone, free from blemish and perfectly sound. One of three horses (the other two being Ali Bey and the Orlov Arabian) who were sent to England by Count Orlov, he covered at Cottesmore in Rutlandshire for a fee of 10gs. In the stud he got Mr Whitfield's unnamed mare (1780) who has no further record.
 
 
Coxe's Arabian
[Cox's Arabian] ch c 1810c. Imported into America by special permission of the Bey of Tunis in 1816 by the American Consul Charles D Coxe, he was said to stand 15 and one quarter hands and be of the highest caste. He stood the 1820 season in Cincinnati, Ohio. He sired several winners, including Bey of Tunis and Mahomet although his most enduring contribution was his unnamed daughter who became a foundation mare of American Family a89 which still had descendants in the 1990s.
 
 
Crawford's Turk 1740c
See Stamford's Turk.
 
 
Cripple Barb 1705c
 
 
Croft's Bay Barb 1705c
See Cripple Barb.
 
 
Crofts Egyptian
c 1710c. His background is not known although it is possible that he was the same horse as the "fine Barb" stallion called Grand Cairo who was included in a sale as part of the stud of the late Thomas Hall in 1726. In 1732 Mr Crofts "Ægyptian Horse" was advertised to cover at Witton Castle, near Bishop-Auckland in Durham, for a fee of 1 guinea. He was described a strong, well-shaped stallion and sired 10 known offspring between 1725 and 1730. None of his sons were named or bred on. One of his unnamed daughters was the ancestress of the St Leger winner The Duchess [ex-Duchess of Leven] (b f 1813 Cardinal York) and the Chester Cup winner King Cole (b c 1833 Memnon). She was also the 3rd dam of Mr Holme's stallion Barrock Billy (ch c 1753 Cade). Although he was never on the turf, Barrock Billy, described as standing 15 hands, master of any weight, and going as well "upon his legs as any horse in England," entered the stud at Barrockside, near Carlisle, for a fee of 1 guinea. Another unnamed daughter of the Egyptian was the 2nd dam of William Preston's Hero (gr c 1753 Cade), winner of the Royal Plate at York in 1759 and then sent to Ireland.
 
 
Cullen Arabian br c 1740
 
 
Cumberland's Arabian 1745c
See Muley Ishmael.
 
 
Curwen's Arabian
c 1675c. He was the property of the famous Henry Curwen (1661-1725) of Workington, Cumberland, who owned and bred a great many horses including the notable Curwen's Bay Barb (b c 1681c). There is speculation that Curwen's Arabian may be the same horse as Pelham's Bay Arabian who was also called Spanker (b c 1675c Darcy's Yellow Turk). He sired the Vintner Mare (bl f 1685c), taproot mare of Family 9.
 
 
Curwen's Bay Barb 1681c
 
 
Curwen's Chesnut Arabian 1695c
See Darcy's Chesnut Arabian.
 
 
Curwen's Grey Morocco Barb
gr c 1690c. He may possibly be the same horse as Curwen's Grey Turk. Owned by Henry Curwen, he sired the 5th dam of Mr Pembroke's Aimwell (gr c 1750 Babraham) [Pond 1754:149]. The Racing Calendar also indicates that Curwen's Grey Morocco Barb sired the 5th dam of Aimwell [Heber:1755]. However, according to the Turf Register, the 5th dam of Aimwell was sired by Lord Fairfax's Grey Morocco Barb [Pick 1:156]. The 5th dam of Aimwell may possibly be Sir William Strickland's Grey Morocco Barb Mare, who is recorded in the General Stud Book as a daughter of Leedes Arabian Mare "sister to Leedes, sometimes called Cream Cheeks" [GSB 1:12], although it should be noted that the pedigree of Aimwell lacks the cross to the Old Morocco Mare. Another Curwen Barb Mare exerted considerable influence in America as the dam of the worthy stallion Monkey (b c 1725 Lonsdale Arabian) and her other son, Hazard (b c 1726 Leedes), sired Liberty (b c 1749) whose daughter was the 2nd dam of the good stallion Mousetrap (b c 1771 Warren's Careless).
 
 
Curwen's Grey Turk
gr c 1690c. He was also owned by Henry Curwen and was the sire of three known offspring, including Flanderkin (c 1707) and his sister (f 1695c) the latter the third dam of Cuthbert Routh's York Gold Cup winner Hanniball (c 1713 Terror). An unnamed daughter foaled perhaps his most famous descendant, Mr Bathurst's North Country Diamond (ch c 1726 Jew Trump). Diamond won numerous plates and prizes in a turf career that spanned six years and covered both the north and south of England and was later a somewhat successful stallion getting an unnamed mare (f 1730c) who was a foundation mare of Family 32.
 
 
Curzon's Grey Barb
gr c 1735c. He was owned by Sir Nathaniel Curzon (1676-1758) 4th bt of Kedleston, Derbyshire, who bred and raced many horses in his day, notably Jason (gr c 1749 Old Standard) and Silverleg (ch c 1743 Young Cartouch). His wife Mary was the daughter of Sir Ralph Assheton of Lancashire, the owner of Fox (b c 1714 Clumsey) and Fox Cub (b c 1714 Clumsey). The Barb sired three colts recorded in the General Stud Book although none of them had any success on the turf or in the stud.
 
 
Cyprus Arabian 1710c
 
 
Daghee (GB)
ch c 1829 (Muley - Mare, by Sheikh Arabian). His pedigree, as presented in the American Stud Book [AmSB 1:18] is highly unlikely. He was perhaps an Arabian himself. He was imported into Canada by Commander Barrie of the Royal Navy and afterwards taken to America. He stood in New Jersey in 1835. He sired Peter Pindar (ch c 1836), a good stallion in Canada.
 
 
Damascus Arabian
bl c 1754. Sire Line Damascus Arabian. Imported from Syria in 1760 he was bred by a Sheikh of Acria who presented him as a foal to the Bashaw of Damascus who in turn gave him to a Turkey merchant at Aleppo. As a two year old he was purchased by an "English gentleman". He was "known to be of the purest Arabian breed, in that country, without any mixture of the Turcoman or Barb". He was said to stand over 14 hands and half an inch which at the time was considered large and possess bone and substance as well. In Yorkshire he covered only thoroughbred mares for William Coates at Smeaton, in Surrey for Samuel Tate at Mickleham, for John Tuting at Newmarket and eventually at Wickham in Essex. His fee varied from 2 guineas to 10 guineas. He sired over twenty offspring the most notable of whom was an unnamed mare (f 1778) the ancestress of Longbow (b c 1849 Ithuriel), Tranby (br c 1826 Blacklock) and Wagtail (b f 1818 Prime Minister) the latter the taproot mare of Family 21-a. He also got several good runners, including the winners Signal (b c 1763), Flush (b c 1764) and Atom (br c 1765).
 
 
Darcy's Chesnut Arabian
[Darcy's Old Chesnut Turk, Darcy's Yellow Turk] ch c 1670c. Sire Line Darcy's Yellow Turk.
 
 
Darcy's Chesnut Arabian
ch c 1695c. We speculate that Darcy's Chesnut Arabian, owned by James Darcy the Younger (1650-1731), was acquired from Henry Curwen (1661-1725) and was the same horse as Curwen's Chesnut Arabian. It is also possible that this horse is the same horse as Pulleine's Chesnut Arabian. He has three known offspring, Little George's Dam (f 1700c), Mr Curwen's stallion Jew Trump (b c 1709) and Lord Darcy's Young Violet Layton (f 1715c). Of these three Little George's Dam was the most significant since all of Family 12-b, 12-c, 12-d, 12-e and 12-f descend from her.
 
 
Darcy's White Turk
[Place's White Turk or Sedbury Turk] gr c 1670c. Sire Line Darcy's White Turk.
 
 
Darcy's Yellow Turk
c 1670c. Sire Line Darcy's Yellow Turk.
 
 
Darley Arabian
b c 1700. Sire Line Darley Arabian.
 
 
Devonshire Arabian
c 1680c. He was owned in Derbyshire by William Cavendish (1640-1707), 1st Duke of Devonshire, at Chatsworth, also the owner of such renowned horses as Childers (b c 1714 Darley Arabian) and Basto (bl c 1703 Byerley Turk). The Arabian's single known contribution to the stud book was an unnamed mare (f 1690c) who was the ancestress of Figure (br c 1757 Hamilton's Figure) who had such a great success as a stallion in America.
 
 
Devonshire Chesnut Arabian
ch c 1740c. He covered at the stud of William Cavendish (1698-1755), 3rd Duke of Devonshire, breeder of such horses as Second (br c 1732 Childers) and Snip (br c 1736 Childers). He sired nearly twenty known offspring none of whom made any lasting impression on the stud book, although Sister to Brimstone (gr f 1756) produced Mr Vernon's good runner Sulphur (gr c 1762 Spectator) who was later a stallion in the stud of HRH the Duke of Cumberland.
 
 
Devonshire Grey Arabian
gr c 1745c. He was also owned by the 3rd Duke of Devonshire and is credited with six offspring in the stud book although none of them bred on.
 
 
Devonshire Turk
ch c 1715c. He may have been the same horse as Sutton's Turk. According to the General Stud Book this stallion was given by William Cavendish (1673-1729), 2nd Duke of Devonshire, to Daniel Finch (1689-1769), 8th Earl of Winchelsea and 3rd Earl of Nottingham [GSB 1:83]. Of three stud book offspring, Fair Wanderer (f 1725c) was the 2nd dam of the Doncaster Cup winner Meaburn (b c 1761 Mirza), and one of the Turk's unnamed daughters was a foundation mare of Family 18 and ancestress of horses such as the Derby winners Waxy (b c 1790 Pot8os) and April the Fifth (br c 1929 Craig an Eran). The Turk is also credited with two foals in the Devonshire stud in the 1729 inventory taken on the death of the Duke [Royal Studs: 123].
 
 
Dey Of Algiers
gr c 1794. He was described in the American Stud Book as an elegantly formed Arabian horse standing over 14.2 hands and possessing both beauty and strength. His nearly white coat was sprinkled with brown spots over his neck and shoulders. Imported into Germany in 1798 and purchased the next year by Lieutenant-General Frederick who then sold him to Colonel Swan of Massachusetts. Swan shipped him to General Jackson in Boston, who in turn sent him to General Mason in Washington, DC in 1802. He sired Algerine (gr c 1804).
 
 
Dodsworth (GB)
c 1670c. Sire Line Dodsworth. Family 32. Research of James Hardiman suggests that he could be the same horse as Darcy's Yellow Turk.
 
 
Dowla
[Clement's Arabian, Oxlade Arabian] b c 1764. Said to have been bred in the mountains of Moses by the Imaum of Senna, he was described as "extremely beautiful, remarkable strong and bony" and "allowed by all who have seen him, to be the finest Arabian in this Kingdom". Given to the Governor of Mocha as a two year old, he was chosen to wear the King of Senna's medal, denoting the finest bred horse in Arabia Felix, as a three year old. He travelled to England aboard the Royal Charlotte East Indiaman under the helm of Captain John Clements in 1768 and was advertised to cover in Berkshire for Mr Oxlade of Bisham Park in 1769 for a fee of 10 guineas. He appears to have acquired the name of Dowla the following year. He left three offspring in the stud book, including Mr Stephenson's Dart (ch c 1770) who won a fifty at Odiham whilst beating eleven others, however none of them appear to have bred on.
 
 
Eaton Barb
c 1760c. He is possibly the same horse as Lord Grosvenor's Arabian. Richard Grosvenor (1731-1802), 1st Earl Grosvenor, of Eaton Hall in Cheshire and Oxcroft Farm near West Wratting in Cambridgeshire, began racing in 1753 and established an extensive and successful stud. Among his horses were such as Bandy (b c 1747 Cade), Gimcrack (gr c 1760 Cripple), Pacolet (gr c 1763 Blank), Mambrino (gr c 1768 Engineer), Sweetwilliam (ch c 1768 Syphon), Sweetbriar (ch c 1769 Syphon), Protector (br c 1770 Matchem) and Pot8os (ch c 1773 Eclipse). He also bred three Derby winners and five Oaks winners. The Barb sired only one stud book entry, the Eaton Barb Mare (f 1767), who had no recorded produce.
 
 
Egremont Barb
[possibly Forbes Arabian] c 1795c. George O'Brien Wyndham (1751-1837), 3rd Earl of Egremont, of Petworth in Sussex bred five Derby winners and five Oaks winner during his sojourn on the turf and was associated with such horses as Precipitate (ch c 1787 Mercury), Gohanna (b c 1790 Mercury) and Peri (b f 1822) the dam of the great Sir Hercules (bl c 1826 Whalebone). The Egremont Barb sired the Duke of Richmond's Tetuan (br c 1803) from Lord Egremont's Oaks winner Nightshade (b f 1785 Pot8os). Tetuan does not appear to have bred on.
 
 
Eley's Turk
[Ely Turk] gr c 1700c (Lister Turk). Sire Line Lister Turk. Although he is recorded in the General Stud Book as "Ely Turk (sire of Old Pert)" [GSB 1:389], Mr Prior points out that Old "Pert is wrongly described... as by the Ely Turk, but in Heber's Racing Calendar... he is correctly stated to be by Champion" [Heber 1761:143]. Mr Eley's Turk is among the list of stallions in the Ancaster Stud of the 2nd Duke from 1719 to 1737 as reproduced by Mr Prior [Early Records: 79]. The Turk sired Greathead (b c 1711) winner of the King's Gold Cup at York in 1717 and in turn sire of one colt in the stud book, Headpiece (b c 1719).
 
 
Fairfax's Morocco Barb
gr c 1665c. Sire Line Fairfax's Morocco Barb.
 
 
Fawkener's Grey Turk
gr c 1735c. Sir Everard Fawkener (1694-1758), also spelled Faulkner, was the British ambassador to Constantinople from 1737 to 1744, and later secretary to HRH the Duke of Cumberland. In 1753 he was advertised by John Knevett to cover at the White Lyon in Eye, Suffolk, for a fee of 1 guinea. He was said to be as fine a horse any in England and to go remarkably well upon his legs. He was thought a very certain foal getter. The Turk had only two known offspring. The first, Greasy (gr f 1747c), ran as an aged mare at Doncaster in 1755 for Lord Robert Sutton Manners, placing fourth in a 70 guineas sweepstakes. The second, an unnamed mare (gr f 1740c), produced Mr Pembroke's Aimwell (gr c 1750 Babraham) who won a fifty at Chipping-Norton in 1754.
 
 
Fenwick Barb
c 1675c. Sire Line Fenwick Barb.
 
 
Ferrers's Arabian
b c 1765c. Washington Shirley (1722-1778), 5th Earl Ferrers, and probably Robert Shirley (1723-1787), 6th Earl Ferrers, maintained a small breeding operation at their family seat at Staunton Herald in Leicestershire. The stallion won the Arabian Plate at Newmarket and later covered for a fee of 10 guineas. He sired 12 known offspring from 1773 to 1779 and most of them appear to have remained in the family. Mrs Stuart's Betty (ch f 1773) ran 3rd for the King's Plate for mares at Chelmsford, Lord Clermont's unnamed colt (b c 1773) won a 25 guineas match at Newmarket and Lord Ferrers's Flavia (b f 1774) won a 100 guineas sweepstakes at Newmarket. None of them bred on.
 
 
Fletcher's Arabian
[Vane's Arabian] ch c 1730c. Sire Line Fletcher's Arabian. One of Mr Mosco's imports.
 
 
Forbes Arabian
c 1795c. He sired one unnamed colt (ch c 1817), owned by Mr Porter, from Lord Egremont's Sister to Chester (br f 1800 Sir Peter Teazle). He could possibly be the same horse as the Egremont Barb.
 
 
Foreign Horse at Hampton Court 1720c
 
 
Gascoigne's Foreign Horse
[Gascoigne's Arabian] c 1710c. He appears to have belonged to several generations of the Gascoigne family, namely Sir Thomas (1659-1718), 4th bt, Sir John (1662-1723), 5th bt and Sir Edward (1697-1750), 6th bt. Gascoigne's Foreign Horse earned his place in history as the sire of Daffodil's Dam. Daffodil's Dam (f 1715c), the tapoot mare of Family 20, was owned and bred by Sir Thomas and although she belonged briefly to his brother Sir John, her stud career would have been managed by Sir Edward. She produced Lord Portmore's Daffodil (ch c 1725 Bald Galloway), said to be a high class stayer, and Mr Durham's Favourite (gr f 1728 Royal Ball), who won the Royal Plate at Hambleton in 1733 beating twenty other entries. Family 20 descends from the latter mare, Favourite. The Gascoigne stud, located at Parlington, between Aberford and Leedes, in Yorkshire, gained prominence under the custodianship of a descendant, Sir Thomas, (1743-1810) 8th bt. He bred the fine mare, Violet (ch f 1787 Shark), who produced at least thirteen foals, of whom six were good winners. They included the St Leger winner Symmetry (gr c 1795 Delpini), and the Oaks winner Theophania (b f 1800 Delpini), also Thomasina (ch f 1804 Timothy) who won the Doncaster Stakes and was the third dam of the St Leger winner, Jerry (bl c 1821 Smolensko), Tooee (ch f 1799 Buzzard) who won a King's Plate and placed third in the Oaks, and Slapbang (ch c 1796 Delpini) who came in third in the St Leger. Another daughter, Golden Locks (ch f 1793 Delpini), produced the St Leger winner and Champion Sire Soothsayer (ch c 1808 Sorcerer). Sir Thomas also bred and raced the St Leger winner Hollandaise (gr f 1775 Matchem), whose half-sister Gunilda (gr f 1777 Star) was sent to Virginia, and raced the St Leger winner Tommy (ch c 1776 Wildair) who was half-brother to his broodmare, Violet. Richard Oliver Gascoigne, son-in-law of the last Sir Thomas, is recorded as the breeder of Soothsayer, who was later sold to Lord Foley and eventually sent to Russia. Richard Gascoigne also bred Louisa (br f 1813 Orville), a daughter of Thomasina, who produced the St Leger winner, Jerry, and the Champion Stakes winner Jessy (ch f 1824 Comus).
 
 
Gibson's Grey Arabian
[Barrington's Arabian] gr c 1760c. Owned William Wildman Barrington (1717-1793), 2nd Viscount Barrington, MP for Berwick-on-Tweed and in 1745 seated in the Irish House of Lords. In 1754 he was returned to parliament for Plymouth and thereafter held numerous posts including those of treasurer of the navy and secretary of war. His seat was at Becket House in Berkshire. The horse was said to have been purchased in Yemen from the Immaum of Sinna for £400 sterling from where he was transported down the Red Sea to Bombay and thence to England on the indiaman Earl of Elgin. He stood nearly 15 hands and was described as "extremely beautiful, remarkably strong and in perfect health". He covered at the Riding House in Mayfair until his purchase by Mr Gibson when he moved to Middlesex at Brands, near Hampstead. He sired ten stud book offspring only one of whom bred on for another generation. The most successful were Sir H Harpur's Dairymaid (b f 1772) who won two fifties at Derby and a fifty at Leicester in 1776, and a fifty at Derby in 1777, and Christopher Blake's Giboutski (b c 1767) who won a 200gs match as a two year old at Newmarket Second Spring in 1769 from the six year old mare Stilts. Christopher Blake, a member of the Jockey Club and owner of the celebrated Firetail (b c 1769 Squirrel), was an early proponent of two year old racing.
 
 
Godolphin Arabian
[Coke's Arabian] b c 1724. Sire Line Godolphin Arabian.
 
 
Godolphin Brown Barb
[Western Barb] br c 1743. Lord Godolphin acquired him from Mr Belchier on January 13, 1750, and the horse arrived at Gog Magog three days later. He was purchased by Mr Larkin on November 11, 1756. Said to have had a small star [Royal Studs:163], he was advertised in the racing calendars to cover in Yorkshire at Ellerton, near Richmond, for a fee of 2 guineas. Of seventeen known offspring only one mare bred on for another generation. His most successful sons were Sir John Moore's Hazard (gr c 1752) who won a fifty at Burford in 1757 and Mr Lincoln's Markwell (b c 1754) who finished 2nd for a fifty at Chipping Norton in 1758.
 
 
Godolphin Grey Barb
[Godolphin Grey Turk] gr c 1740c. It is not known how long he remained in the Godolphin stud since he does not appear in their private records. He was said by the General Stud Book to be the same horse as the Devonshire Grey Arabian [GSB 1:76], however Mr Prior notes that he was not [Royal Studs: 164]. His son, Sir John Moore's Venture (b g 1744), won a match for 40gs defeating Lord Eglinton's Chance at Newmarket and the £20 city plate at Salisbury in 1753. His only known daughter produced Coomb (b c 1749 Janus) who won fifties at Stamford, Huntingdon and Ascot-Heath in 1753 and finished 2nd to Mr Grisewood's Teazer (gr c 1749 Old Teazer) for a fifty at Ascot-Heath in 1754; Louisa (b f 1750 Babraham) who finished 2nd for the King's Plate at Newmarket in 1756; Newcastle Jack (ch c 17151 Babraham) who won fifties at Lambourn, Ascot-Heath and Blandford in 1756; and Pug (bl c 1753 Bolton Starling) who finished 2nd for a sweepstakes at Ascot-Heath in 1757.
 
 
Goring's Foreign Horse
c 1680c. Owned by Sir William Goring (1659-1724), 3rd bt, of Burton, Sussex, his only offspring in the stud book is the Duke of Somerset's Jenny-Come-Tye-Me, an ancestress of Ashridge Ball (c 1711c Leedes). However in the Petworth papers note is made that Sir William Goreing's Barb was used as a stallion in 1701. Petworth, in Sussex, was home to Charles Seymour (1662-1748), the 6th Duke of Somerset.
 
 
Gower's Dun Barb
bu c 1750c. He may have been the same horse as the Hampton Court Dun Barb. Owned by Granville Leveson-Gower (1721-1803), 1st Marquess of Stafford, 2nd Earl Gower of Trentham Hall, Staffordshire, he sired twelve offspring, a number of whom appear to have inherited his colour. None of them bred on or seem to have made any mark on the turf although Mr Vernon's Honeycomb (b f 1760) was among the field for a fifty at Newmarket in 1763.
 
 
Gray's Inn Arabian 1770c
See Sultan Mahomet.
 
 
Gregory's Arabian
b c 1761c. Imported and owned by Mr Gregory, he was bred by the "King of Sinnan in the mountains of Moses, in the province of Yannam in Arabian Felix". He was said to stand 14 hands 3 inches. In 1773 he covered in Essex at Rolls, near Chigwell for a fee of 10 guineas. He may have covered for a season at Rycote and in 1778 he stood in Essex at Walthamstow. He appears to have sired seven stud book offspring although perhaps some of these should be credited to the Gregory Grey Arabian. One of his daughters produced Lord Abingdon's stallion Je-Ne-Sais-Quoi (br c 1776 Marske) who covered at Coton Hall, near Bridgnorth for a fee of 1 guinea. Coton Hall was home to the ancestors of the famous American general Robert E Lee.
 
 
Gregory's Grey Arabian
[Rycote Arabian] gr c 1763c. This Arabian does not appear in the General Stud Book. Also bred by the "King of Sinnan in the mountains of Moses, in the province of Yannam in Arabian Felix" he stood 15 and a half hands. Owned by Mr Gregory and later by Willoughby Bertie (1740-1799), 4th Earl of Abingdon, he covered at Chigwell and later at Lord Abingdon's stud at Rycote in Oxfordshire along with Marske (br c 1750 Squirt) for a fee of 5 guineas. He is credited with two known offspring, Lord Abingdon's Victor (gr c 1771) and his brother.
 
 
Gresley's Bay Arabian 1685c
See Bay Roan.
 
 
Grosvenor Arabian
ch c 1760c. Sire Line Grosvenor Arabian.
 
 
Guise
c 1680c. Guise was owned by John Manners (1638-1711), 9th Earl of Rutland, whose main residence was at Haddon Hall in Derbyshire before he was created Duke of Rutland in 1703, at which time he moved to the family's principle seat Belvoir Castle, the latter having been damaged during the civil war. He could possibly be the same horse as Rutland's Blacklegs. He sired only one known offspring, an unnamed mare who was the second dam of Mr Egerton's White Stockings (ch c 1710 Wood's Counsellor). White Stockings finished fourth for a plate at York in 1715 won by Sir William Strickland's Chaunter (b c 1710 Acaster Turk), but defeated Mr Honeywood's True Blue (gr c 1710 Honeywood's Arabian) although the latter was said to be much out of condition.
 
 
Hadley's Arab
1775c. Nothing is known about this horse other than that he sired a foundation mare of American Family a84 which still had descendants in the 1990s. Jet Blast (gr c 1985 Master Jason) won the North Dakota Derby in 1988 and Dancer's Bid (gr c 1975 Snow 'Em) won the North Dakota Futurity in 1977.
 
 
Hales Barb
gr c 1685c. Very little is known about this horse other than that he appears to have belonged to the same Sir Edward who owned the Hales Turk. The Barb is mentioned in an article about Lord Wharton's Winchendon stud in Buckinghamshire by F M Prior. He is recorded as a stallion in a list of broodmares for 1706, "Goodman's mare very fleet Got by Sr Edward Hales his fine white Barbe came out of Fenick" [British Racehorse, August, 1956:201].
 
 
Hales Turk
b c 1685c. The Turk was owned by Sir Edward Hales (1645-1695), 3rd bt of Woodchurch and Tunstall, Kent, a member of the House of Commons prior to the revolution of 1688. A follower of James II he was subsequently a member of his privy council, a lord of the admiralty and deputy governor of the Tower of London. During the revolution he was interred in the Tower but on his release joined James II in France where he was created Earl of Tenterden, Viscount Tunstall and Baron Hales of Emley in the Jacobite peerage. The Turk's single stud book offspring was the Oldfield Mare who heads Family 14. The Oldfield Mare appears to have been in the stud of Robert Bertie (1660-1723), 1st Duke of Ancaster, as all her known offspring were foaled at Grimsthorpe.
 
 
Hall's Arabian
ch c 1715c. Sire Line Hall's Arabian. Described as a fine barb stallion he covered in Yorkshire at the stud of Thomas Hall of Hornby, near Smeaton, for a fee of two guineas. He may be the same horse as Grand Cairo or Crofts Egyptian. His most notable offspring was Mr Heneage's Whitenose (b c 1722) who in turn sired Silvertail (b f 1737) the dam of the stallions Careless (ch c 1751 Regulus), Sportsman (b c 1753 Cade) and Fearnought (b c 1755 Regulus) and from whom most of Family 32 descends. One of his unnamed daughters produced the York Royal Plate winner Scrutineer (b c 1732 Aleppo).
 
 
Hampton Court Arabians
Hampton Court Black Arabian 1740c, Hampton Court Brown Barb 1690c, Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian 1710c, Hampton Court Dun Barb 1740c, Hampton Court Grey Arabian 1720c, Hampton Court Grey Barb 1695c, Hampton Court Litton Arabian 1710c
 
 
Harborough's Arabian
1815c. The Arabian was owned by Robert Sherard (1797-1859), 6th Earl Harborough, of Stapleford Park, near Melton Mowbray, in Leicestershire. He may have sired C M Phillipps's Camilla (f 1828), as the General Stud Book notes that she was by Sir Gilbert or Harborough's Arabian [GSB 5:46]. She is the ancestress of the American stallion Flying Dutchman (ch c 1892 Wagner) and two Alberta Derby winners: Franks Mistake (br c 1945 Osiris) and Flying Joe (br c 1951 Goldstream).
 
 
Harley's Arabian 1701c
 
 
Harpham Arabian
c 1690c. Sire Line Harpham Arabian.
 
 
Harpur's Barb
c 1690c. Sire Line Harpur's Barb.
 
 
Harrison's Arabian
gr c 1720c. The Arabian was probably owned by Edward Harrison (1674-1732), governor of Madras from 1711 to 1717, MP for Hertford after his return to England, and postmaster general from 1725 to 1732. His daughter Audrey married Charles Townshend (1700-1764), 3rd Viscount Townshend, lord of the bedchamber to King George I, in 1723. His "pearl-coloured" Arabian covered at Hampton Court and sired an unnamed mare, one of the foundation mares of Family 101 (Slugey), which produced two branches in America. The first, through Queen Mab (gr f 1745c Mosco's Grey Arabian), included Hopper's Pacolet (gr c 1750c Spark) and Hayne's King Herod (b c 1768 Fearnought). The second, through Moore's Britannia* (b f 1750 Hampton Court Dun Barb), included Ashe's Roebuck (br c 1780c Sweeper). Another daughter produced the good runner Maggot (gr c 1750 Dismal), winner of fifties at Bury, Brentwood, Marlborough, Coventry and Ipswich during a turf career that spanned six years. Despite being "hip-shot from a foal" Maggot was described as standing 14 hands 3 inches and having great strength, "just symmetry" as well as health and soundness. He retired to the stud in Suffolk at Bury St Edmonds where he covered for a fee of 1 guinea. Maggot left no offspring in the stud book. A third daughter was the grandam of both Young Brilliant (ch c 1766 Brilliant) and John Knevett's Gander (ch c 1768 Panton's Arabian). Young Brilliant was described as a beautiful, handsomely marked chesnut standing full 15 hands. He appears to have performed poorly in his only race, finishing fourth of four for a fifty at Thetford in 1770, after which he was sent to the stud. He covered for Isaac Jacob at the New Swan in Southwold for a fee of 1 guinea. Gander had more success on the turf with victories in fifties at Brentwood and Maidenhead in 1771 and at Ludlow in 1772. Said to be perfectly sound, stand 15 and one-half hands with very large bone, and to be as fine a horse as any by those who had seen him, he covered at Eye, Suffolk, for a fee of 1 guinea. Neither Young Brilliant nor Gander left any descendants on the turf.
 
 
Hautboy (GB)
c 1685c (Darcy's White Turk - Royal Mare). Sire Line Darcy's White Turk.
 
 
Heathfield's Grey Arabian
gr c 1795c. Francis Augustus Eliott (1750-1813), 2nd Baron Heathfield, of Bayley (later Heathfield) Park in Sussex engaged in a military career during which he advanced to the rank of general in 1808. He maintained a small stud for about ten years at the beginning of the 19th century with mares mainly from a Hampton Court background. The Arabian had five known offspring, the most successful of whom was probably Euphrates (b c 1800). None of the Heathfield stock bred on.
 
 
Hector
[Old] c 1800c. The identity of Old Hector has not been established with any certainty and in fact he may have been one horse, or several, with the same name. Around 1806 he was imported into New South Wales from India by R Campbell of Sydney. Although he was said to have been advertised as a Persian he was also said to have been a fine Arabian, an India-bred, and an English thoroughbred, the latter based on his size and character. Standing nearly sixteen hands, he was described as a very fine bay of commanding appearance who transmitted remarkable gameness and stoutness to his stock. He died in 1829 around the end of December.
 
 
Helmsley Turk
c 1665c. Sire Line Helmsley Turk.
 
 
Hillsborough's Turk
c 1715c. Trevor Hill (1693-1742), 1st Viscount Hillsborough, represented Ayesbury (1715-1722) and Malmesbury (1722) in the House of Commons and also County Down (1717) in the Irish House of Commons. He maintained a small racing establishment from about 1710 to 1720 with his most successful runner probably being Ruffler (later Sir William Morgan's) who defeated the Duke of Wharton's Desdemona (f 1714 Greyhound) at Newmarket in 1719. Desdemona was said to be one of the best plate mares of her time in the north. Lord Hillsborough's Turk sired only one known offspring, Sir William Morgan's unnamed colt (ch c 1722) from a Leedes Mare at Hampton Court. The colt had no descendants.
 
 
His Majesty's one-eyed Arabian [Hampton Court Grey Arabian] 1720c
 
 
Holderness Turk
1705c. Sire Line Holderness Turk. The Holderness Turk was sent to England by Sir Robert Sutton (1671-1746), ambassador in Constantinople from 1702 to 1717 during the reigns of Queen Anne and King George I. Sir Robert was the great nephew of Robert Sutton (1594-1668), 1st Baron Lexington. Lord Lexington's daughter Bridget was the mother of Robert Darcy (1681-1722), 3rd Earl of Holderness, of Hornby Castle, Yorkshire. The Turk was given to Lord Holderness, from whom he presumably gained his name. Elizabeth, sister of Lord Holderness, married Sir Ralph Milbanke (1689-1748), 4th bt, of Halnaby, Yorkshire. Probably the most famous of his offspring was Hartley's Blind Horse (ch c 1712c, produced by Milbanke's Black Mare), a well patronised stallion and sire of Hutton's Spot (gr c 1728), Crofts's Forester (ch c 1736) and Sachrissa (ch f 1729) the dam of Babraham (b c 1738 Godolphin Arabian). Another son, Old Royal (c 1715c), got the celebrated Bald Charlotte (ch f 1721), ancestress of the hugely successful branch of Family 40 in America that included Boston (ch c 1833 Timoleon). An unnamed son sired the good winner Ticklepitcher (ch c 1722). One of his daughters was the 2nd dam of the winners Captain (br c 1752 Young Cartouch) and General (b c 1758 Young Cartouch) as well as their half sister Cassandra (b f 1754 Whitenose), the latter the 2nd dam of Harris's Eclipse (b c 1771 Fearnought) and Baylor's Shakespeare (br c 1772 Fearnought), both prominent stallions in America.
 
 
Honywood's Arabian
[Honeywood`s Arabian] gr c 1695c. Sire Line Honywood's Arabian. The General Stud Book notes that he was more frequently called the Honywood Arabian but was also called Sir J Williams's Turk [GSB 1:391] whilst the Turf Register says he the property of Sir John Williams ... who sold him to Mr Turner of Suffolk, who disposed of him to Mr Honywood [Pick 1:91]. Sir John Williams (1670c-1743) of Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk, knighted in 1713, was a director of the South Sea Company from 1711 to 1713, alderman of London in 1723, sheriff in 1729-30, and Lord Mayor in 1735-36. A wealthy London merchant with influence on the "Turkey trade," he married Mary, daughter of Richard Onslow (1654-1717), 1st Baron Onslow, the latter a speaker of the House of Commons, and sometime owner of Warton's Commoner (gr c 1710c Crofts Commoner). Sir Charles Turner (1666-1738), 1st bt of Warham, Norfolk, knighted in 1696 and created baronet in 1727, was MP for King's Lynn from 1695 to 1728 and married Mary, sister of Sir Robert Walpole, the first prime minister. Sir Charles may have been the owner of Turner's Star (b c 1736 Curzon's Brisk). Sir Philip Honywood (1677-1752) of Marks Hall, Essex, an army officer who attained the rank of major-general with a regiment called Honywood's Dragoons (now the 11th Hussars), was, for his services in Spain, appointed governor of Portsmouth in 1740. Sir Philip kept a small racing stable from the turn of the 18th century to around 1730. A descendant, Sir J Honywood, also had a small stud at the end of the century. Honeywood's Arabian sired True Blue (gr c 1710), winner of the York Royal Plate in 1716, and Young True Blue (gr c 1718), winner of the same in 1724. He also sired two unnamed grey sisters to True Blue, one of whom was a foundation mare of Family 3.
 
 
Howe's Persian
c 1700c. The Persian was owned by Scrope Howe (1648-1712), 1st Viscount Howe, MP for Nottinghamshire for many years, Comptroller of the Excise, and Groom of the Bedchamber to King William III. His first wife, Lady Anne Manners, was the daughter of John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland, and his second wife was the Hon Julia Alington, daughter of William Alington, 3rd Baron Alington. The Persian is perhaps best known as the sire of the taproot mare of Family 39, who was probably the Duke of Rutland's Old Bonny Black although in the General Stud Book she is recorded as an unnamed mare by Lord Howe's Persian stallion [GSB 1:9]. Old Bonny Black was a famous runner herself, winning several Gold Cups and matches, and her daughter, the Duke of Rutland's Bonny Black (bl f 1715 Black Hearty), gained celebrity by winning Royal Plates at Hambleton and Newmarket. The Persian sired another five known offspring, only one of whom, Antelope (b c 1726), had any success on the turf. Lord Halifax's Antelope won a 200gs match from the Duke of Bridgewater's Hazard (b c 1726 Leedes) at Newmarket in 1732.
 
 
Hutton Arabians, Barbs and Turks
Hutton's Bay Arabian 1720c, Hutton's Arabian 1750c, Hutton's Bay Barb 1710c, Hutton's Bay Turk 1710c, Hutton's Grey Barb 1695c, Hutton's Grey Barb 1750c, Hutton's Royal Colt 1685c, Hutton's White Turk 1708
 
 
Imaum
gr c 1845c. Imaum was one of four Arabians presented to Queen Victoria (1819-1901) by the Imaum of Muscat. The Queen gave him to the clerk of the royal stables who subsequently sold him at a Tattersalls sale. He was purchased by the painter John Frederick Herring Senior (1795-1865) who used him as a model for many of his works.
 
 
Jenkins's Arabian
c 1705c. Owned by Sir Joseph Jenkins, he sired an unnamed mare, the 4th dam of Mr Fettyplace's Creme de Barbade (b c 1764 Snap) and Mr O'Kelly's Calphurnia (b f 1773 Marske). A repectable runner Creme de Barbade won a fifty at Maidenhead in 1768, the Town Plate at Oxford, a fifty at Worcester, finished 2nd for the King's Plate at Burford and, as one of the few horses willing to face the mighty Eclipse (ch c 1764 Marske), Creme de Barbade finished 2° to him for the Noblemen and Gentlemen's Plate at Ascot Heath in 1769. In 1771 he won the City Silver Bowl at Salisbury. Calphurnia won a 100gs each sweepstakes at Burford in 1776. Neither horse left descendants in the stud book.
 
 
Jilfy Arabian 1760c
See Martin's Black Arabian.
 
 
Johnson's Arabian
[Johnson's Turk] c 1715c. He was possibly the same horse as the Clifton Arabian. He sired an unnamed mare, the 2nd dam of Mr Henry Pierse's Commoner (b c 1752 Rib) and the 3rd dam of Mr Joliffe's Foxhunter (ch c 1768 Chesnut Ranger). Commoner won a fifty at Wakefield in 1755 and finished 2nd for the King's Plates at Nottingham and York in 1757. Foxhunter, the second horse of that name to run for Mr Joliffe, finished 2nd for the Royal Plate at York in 1774. The Arabian also got Mr Benson's Johnson (b c 1726c) who won a purse at York and the Ladies Plate at Lincoln in 1731. None of these descendants appear to have bred on.
 
 
Khalan Arabian
ch c 1761. Said to have come from the deserts of Arabia, he was described as a chestnut with no white markings, standing fourteen hands one inch high, with large bone and a beautiful shape. Evidently highly regarded he covered in Lincolnshire at Grimsthorpe, along with Blank (b c 1740 Godolphin Arabian) and Matchless (b c 1754 Godolphin Arabian), for a fee of 10 guineas, which was the same fee commanded by Blank and 5 guineas more than that by Matchless. He was said to be a six year old in 1767 [Heber 1767:213]. His first recorded offspring was Mr Shafto's bay colt of 1763 from Chesnut Ramsden (ch f 1749 Cade) which seems unlikely due both to the year of his birth and his colour [GSB 1:49]. We speculate that Mr Shafto's colt was instead sired by Shafto's Barb. Of his eight other offspring for the Duke of Kingston, the Duke of Northumberland, the Duke of Ancaster (four) and Lord Ferrers (two), none bred on and only two were named. The General Stud Book notes that the Duke of Ancaster's Numidian (b c 1770) was a grey [GSB 1:122] however neither of his parents were grey. He won a 200gs each sweepstakes at Newmarket First Spring in 1774, beating four others, including two King Herod colts. His next, and final, appearance on the turf was in the colours of Mr Foley when he finished 2nd for a fifty at Thetford in 1775. In this race he was described as a bay. Lord Ferrers's Trounc'em (br c 1771) finished 2nd for the Gentlemen's Stakes at Newmarket in 1777.
 
 
Hampton Court Arabians
King George's Persian 1765c,King William's Black Barb 1695c, King William's White Barb 1695c, King's Grey Arabian 1720c
 
 
Lambert Turk
c 1690c. He was possibly the property of John Lambert of Calton (husband of Barbara Lister, and son of the parliamentary general John Lambert). The younger John Lambert was high sheriff of Yorkshire in 1699. He died in 1701 at which time Calton Hall passed to his daughter Frances, wife of Sir John Middleton of Belsay Castle. Lambert Turk sired only one unnamed mare (1700c), the 2nd dam of Dunkirk (gr c 1726 Fox Cub). Dunkirk was bred by Thomas Lister of Gisburne Park and purchased by Charles Colyear (1700-1785), 2nd Earl of Portmore, for the sum of 350 guineas. Noted as one of the best plate horses in the country in his day, he won numerous races over the span of about six years, including a 200gs match from a "Yorkshire Horse called Diamond" [York Courant:1738]. Said to to be a master of 12 stone and stand 14 hands 3 inches, Dunkirk was later advertised to cover in Yorkshire for proprietor John Gale of Bishop Burton for a fee of 1 guinea.
 
 
Layton Grey Barb (GB)
gr c 1690c. (Rockwood). Sire Line Darcy's White Turk. In the pedigree of Williams's Squirrel recorded in the General Stud Book this stallion is called Son of Pulleine's Arabian [GSB 1:1]. Highflyer presents evidence that this son was also sometimes known as the Layton Grey Barb. He is possibly the same horse as the Rockwood Colt who appears in the pedigrees of Hutton's Wormwood and Cottingham. In the stud he got three mares. (1) The dam of Young Violet Layton (f 1715c Darcy's Chesnut Arabian) who had descendants appear in the stud book for two more generations. (2) An unnamed mare, foundation mare of Family 70, and also the grandam of Richard Williams's Squirrel (b c 1719 Snake) winner of the Royal Plate at York in 1725. (3) The dam of Mr Metcalfe's plate winner Harlequin (b c 1719 Mixbury Galloway) who was later a stallion.
 
 
Leedes Arabian
bbl c 1685c. Sire Line Leedes Arabian.
 
 
Leedes's Arabian 1755
See Northumberland Brown Arabian.
 
 
Leicester Turk 1682c
See Lister Turk.
 
 
Lexington's Grey Arabian
[Lexington's Turk] gr c 1715c. We speculate that he was the same horse as Stahremberg's Turk. The Lexington Arabian was probably owned by Sir Robert Sutton (1662-1723), 2nd Baron Lexington of Averham (called Aram), Nottinghamshire, Gentleman of the Horse to Princess Anne and ambassador to Vienna and Madrid, who maintained a seat at Averham Park, Nottinghamshire. The horse may have been one of several sent to England over the span of a few years by his great-nephew Sir Robert Sutton (1671-1746), a politician and diplomat who served as ambassador to Constantinople from 1702 to 1717. He is known to have sent a mare to the Duke of Newcastle in 1709 and to have also given the Holderness Turk to Robert Darcy (1681-1721), 3rd Earl of Holderness. Lexington's Arabian had only one recorded offspring, an unnamed mare, said to have been bred by Charles Powlett (1685-1754), 3rd Duke of Bolton, who produced both the Bolton Fearnought (br c 1725 Bay Bolton) and his brother. He may also have been the Duke of Bolton's "Turk", sire of the famous Bolton Moorhen (gr f 1724). Moorhen won plates at Hambleton and Bedale in 1728, defeating Mr Gallant's Young Smiling Tom (gr c 1724 Smiling Tom) in the latter. She also finished 2nd to Mr Egerton's Nanny (gr f 1724 Pigot Turk) for the King's Plate at Hambleton, and 4th for a plate at Middleham in 1729. After the death of Lord Lexington the Arabian may have been acquired by Graf Konrad Sigismund von Stahremberg (1689-1727), the Austro-Hungarian ambassador to England in 1720. The count was noticed attending races at Newcastle in 1724 along with the Duke of Devonshire, Earl of Godolphin, Lord Finch and the Duke of Rutland. Stahremberg's Turk sired one unnamed daughter, the second dam of Lady Northumberland's 1758 Hambleton Royal Plate winner Irene (br f 1753 Cade), who was from a Patriot Mare "bought of the Duke of Bolton" [Pick 1:466]. Irene left no offspring in the stud book. Following the death of von Stahremberg the horse, "lately the Duke of Bolton's," was advertised in 1728 and 1729 by John Storzaker to cover at Hutton-Conyers, near Ripon, Yorkshire, for a fee of 1 guinea. He was described as a fine, strong horse, standing nearly 15 hands, and free from blemish. Whilst in Mr Storzaker's stud he got Mr Peter's minor winner Swad (ch c 1730 Bolton's Turk). Swad was later advertised to cover at Ripon for a fee of 2 guineas.
 
 
Lindsey's Arabian
[Ranger] gr c 1762. Said to have been presented to a British frigate captain by a son of the Emperor of Morocco, he first travelled to the West Indies, where he broke three of his legs jumping off a pile of lumber. Despite this he was said to be of perfect form and symmetry which he passed on to his offspring. He arrived in Connecticut in 1766. He covered in Virginia from 1779, in Maryland from 1781 and in Virginia from 1783. One of his many owners was Captain W Lindsey of Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, from whom he appears to have derived his name. Greatly esteemed as a stallion, he is credited with many fine racehorses and broodmares. Among his offspring were Diana 3rd (ch f 1780), Grey Alfred (gr c 1780c), and Page's Tippoo Saib (gr c 1780). He died in 1785.
 
 
Lister Turk
[Stradling Turk, Leicester Turk] gr c 1682c. Sire Line Lister Turk.
 
 
Little Barb 1685c
See Lowther Arabians, Barbs, and Turks.
 
 
Little Mountain Barb
c 1705c. John Churchill (1650-1722), 1st Duke of Marlborough, was given the old Woodstock Palace site, near Oxford, by Queen Anne, on which she had Blenheim Palace built for him in gratitude for his victories over the French at Blenheim in Bavaria. The Barb's only offspring was Miss Tredegar (1710), who produced two fillies and one colt to a variety of stallions, however none of them made any mark on the stud book.
 
 
Lowther Arabians, Barbs and Turks
Lonsdale's Arabian 1720c, Lonsdale's Bay Arabian 1720c, Lonsdale's Black Arabian 1725c, Lonsdale's Grey Arabian 1715c
 
 
Lord Perl 1710c
 
 
Lovaine's Arabian
c 1780c. It is possible that he was the same horse as the Northumberland Chesnut Arabian or the Northumberland Grey Arabian. He was the sire of Mr Franco's unnamed colt (b c 1785), from Lord Bolingbroke's Jilt (br f 1771 Snap), who neither ran nor bred on.
 
 
Lovel's Arabian
c 1720c. Not in the General Stud Book, this horse was owned by Thomas Coke (1697-1759), later Lord Lovel and Earl of Leicester, of Holkham Hall in Norfolk. He sired several horses in the stud of Sir Michael Newton, including Commoner (gr f 1727) and Molly (gr f 1727).
 
 
Lowther Arabians, Barbs and Turks
Lowther's Arabian 1720c, Lowther's Bay Barb 1690c, Lowther's White Legged Barb 1685c
 
 
Mansfield's Arabian
c 1795c. Owned by David William Murray (1777-1840), 3rd Earl of Mansfield, he was the sire of one unnamed colt (ch c 1804) from the Duke of Bedford's Sister to Ringleader (b f 1788 Highflyer). Lord Mansfield was Lord Lieutenant of Clackmannanshire, Scotland, from 1803 to 1840. He also owned a half brother to this colt (ch c 1802 Buzzard), however he doesn't appear to have raced either of them.
 
 
March's Barb
c 1745c. Owned by William Douglas (1724-1810), Lord March and afterwards the 4th Duke of Queensberry, the barb is the sire of record of two offspring in the General Stud Book. His lordship's entire stud was advertised for sale in 1755, including one of the offspring (bl f 1753). Neither of these offspring appear to have raced. Lord March was well known for his exploits on the turf with numerous horses, perhaps especially with Bajazet (b c 1740 Godolphin Arabian).
 
 
Marshall Turk 1680c
 
 
Mariner
c 1820c. An Arabian sent to Australia he was the sire of Flirt (f 1826), one of the foundation mares of Colonial Family c40.
 
 
Martin's Black Arabian
[Jilfy Arabian, Bond's Arabian] bl c 1760c. Imported by Mr Martin in 1765, he travelled to England along with Mr Bell's Arabian. He was described as a strong, healthy horse who got promising offspring, who were generally of good bone, lengthy and well-proportioned. He covered at Mr Bond's, Mitcham, Surrey, in 1768 for a fee of 5 guineas which rose to 10 guineas by 1774. In 1775 he moved to Mr Percival's at Croyden, Surrey, where he covered for a fee of 5 guineas. Of three known offspring, Lord Orford's Scymitar (br c 1766) was the most successful on the turf, winning a £50 match at Newmarket from Sir C Bunbury's Sarpedon (b c 1765 Young Cade). None of them bred on.
 
 
Massey's Black Barb
bl c 1685c. Highflyer says he is the same horse as Makeless (c 1685c Oglethorpe Arabian), a highly regarded stallion in the stud of John Crofts. Under the name of Massey's Black Barb he sired the Massey Mare for John Manners (1638-1711), 1st Duke of Rutland. From her the Duke bred Brown Betty (br f 1713 Basto) who won a Gold Cup and the King's Plate at Newmarket in 1719. She was the dam of Mr Cole's Foxhunter (b c 1727 Lonsdale's Brisk), a good winner who ran from 1734 to 1737 and was later a stallion. The Massey Mare was also the taproot of Family 5 through her other daughter, Old Ebony (bl f 1714 Basto).
 
 
 Matthews's Persian
c 1725c. Sire Line Matthews's Persian. The Persian was probably owned by Commodore Thomas Matthews (1676-1751), a career naval officer from Llandaff, Wales, although the horse must have been a favourite of Lord Godolphin since the latter either bred or purchased three of four of his known offspring, all of whom were foaled from 1729 to 1736c. His best runner was Mr Tuting's Rosinante (b c 1729), winner of races at Stratford, Warwick, Lincoln, Marlborough and Oxford, and the Town Plate at Newmarket, the latter in a walk over. He also appears in the pedigree of Mr Price's Malmsbury (ch g 1802 Cardock), whose damsire Atlas claims a Persian Mare as his fourth dam.
 
 
Meadows's Barb
c 1760c. The barb was possibly owned by Charles Meadows Pierrepont (1737-1816), 1st Earl Manvers of Thoresby Hall in Nottinghamshire, son of Philip Meadows and Frances Pierrepont, the sister of Evelyn Pierrepont (1711-1773), 2nd Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull. On the death of the Dowager Duchess of Kingston in 1788 Charles Meadows took the surname of Pierrepont. He later represented Nottingham in parliament and was raised to the peerage. The barb had one known offspring, an unnamed mare (f 1767) attributed to the Duke of Ancaster. The mare has no further record.
 
 
Milsington's Grey Arabian
gr c 1720c. Probably owned by David Colyear, the elder brother of Charles Colyear (1700-1785), 2nd Earl of Portmore, and perhaps later by Lord Portmore himself. David Colyear bore the courtesy title of Lord Milsington until his death in 1729, predeceasing his father. Thus, when the first earl died in 1730, his heir was his younger son, Charles. The 2nd Earl of Portmore was a great supporter of the turf and owned such horses as Whitenose (b c 1742 Godolphin Arabian) and Othello (bl c 1743 Crab). He married Juliana, widow of Peregrine Osborne (1691-1731), 3rd Duke of Leeds. Lord Milsington's Arabian sired only one known foal, an unnamed mare (f 1727) from Mr Brewster Darley's Aldby Jenny, who does not appear to have had any offspring.
 
 
Milward's Arabian
gr c 1765c. Owned by Mr Milward he produced four known offspring from 1773 to 1775, the only one named being Poverty (gr f 1775), owned by Mr Whitfield. None of them appear to have raced or bred on.
 
 
Model
gr c 1800c. Imported about 1805 by Mr Brown of Abbotsbury, he was said to be a light grey Arabian of high caste and symmetry who made a fundamental contribution to bloodstock development in New South Wales. Among others, he sired Vesta (1825c), the ancestress of the Melbourne Cup winner Acrasia (b f 1897 Gozo), and Yellow Jenny (1820c), the ancestress of Caulfield Cup winner Grace Darling (ch f 1879 The Diver), and Melbourne Cup winner Baghdad Note (gr c 1965 Kurdistan).
 
 
Monkey (GB)
b c 1725 (Lonsdale Bay Arabian - Mare, by Curwen's Bay Barb - Mare, by Byerley Turk - Arabian Mare). Sire Line Lonsdale Bay Arabian.
 
 
Morgan's Arabian 1720c
See Morgan's Grey Barb.
 
 
Morgan's Black Barb
bl c 1720c. This Barb was owned by Sir William Morgan (1700-1731), of Tredegar House, near Newport in south east Wales. Sir William, MP for Brecon and Monmouthshire and later Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire and Monmouthshire, maintained a small stud, possibly an extension of an earlier Morgan's stud, from about 1720 until his early death. He campaigned such horses as Cartouch (c 1717c Bald Galloway) and stood both Cartouch and Lamprie (gr c 1716 Grey Hautboy). Sir William married Rachel, daughter of William Cavendish, the 2nd Duke of Devonshire. The Black Barb sired Sir Thomas Reade's unnamed black filly who was said to have "died young" [GSB 1:109].
 
 
Morgan's Grey Barb
[Morgan's Arabian] gr c 1720c. Also owned by Sir William Morgan and perhaps the same horse as Morgan's Black Barb, he was referred to as an Arabian in Lady Thigh's pedigree presented in the Racing Calendar [Heber 1755:153]. He sired Mr Burdett's (later Mr Figg's) unnamed mare of Family 32, the dam of Mr Brooke's Lady Thigh (b f 1747 Grisewood's Partner) who won fifties at Rugby, Wells and Stockton in 1753, fifties at Northampton, Chipping Norton and Hounslow in 1754, fifties at Knutsford and Leicester in 1755, the City Plate at Salisbury and a fifty at Reading in 1756.
 
 
Morton's Arabian
b c 1740c. He was said to have been imported by Sir Everard Fawkener (1694–1758), the British ambassador to Constantinople from 1737 to 1744, and the Arabian may have passed through the Hutton stud in Yorkshire on his way north. Owned by James Douglas (1702-1768), 14th Earl of Morton, after whom Captain Cook named Moreton Bay in Queensland, Australia, the Arabian sired two known daughters and one son: (1) Mr Hutton's unnamed mare (1746c), the ancestress of much of Family 8 (2) the Duke of Hamilton's unnamed mare (ch f 1748), the dam of Oscar (ch c 1760 Young Snip), who was sent to Virginia around 1767 and became a popular stallion there, getting, among others, Alston's Kitty Fisher, ancestress of Suburban Handicap winner Ramapo (ch c 1890 Pontiac) and a number of good winners in Canada, including the Queen's Plate winner Inferno (b c 1902 Havoc) (3) Lord Morton's unnamed colt (b c 1747) who was advertised for an auction at the Duke's seat at Dalmahoy, near Edinburgh, in 1762. He was described as a bright bay standing 14 hands 3 inches.
 
 
Mosco's Grey Arabian 1740c
 
 
Mostyn Bay Barb 1710c
See Pigot Turk.
 
 
Muley Ishmael
[Cumberland's Arabian] gr c 1745c. There were a number of horses in the Duke's stud whose names were some variation of Muley. It is possible that they were all the same horse or that they were in some way related. Owned by HRH William Augustus (1721-1765), Duke of Cumberland, his most notable offspring was Crawford (gr c 1756). Crawford ran without success at Ascot Heath in 1760. Sent to Virginia later that year he covered there until 1765 and later in both North and South Carolina.
 
 
Newcastle Barb 1735c, Newcastle Turk 1697c
See Welbeck Arabians, Barbs and Turks.
 
 
Newcombe's Arabian
b c 1753. He has been credited with about ten offspring, the later ones for Francis Egerton (1736-1803), 3rd Duke of Bridgewater. Called a Mountain Arabian, he was said to have been purchased as a three year old directly from the "Sheik of St John Diracki" (St John d'Acre, Israel) by Captain Burfoot. He was sold to Mr Newcombe after his arrival in England. Described as being of fine size, superior bone and substance, and thought to more closely resemble the Godolphin Arabian than any other imported Eastern horse. He was advertised by John Giles to cover at Bowes Farm, near Southgate, Middlesex, for a fee of 5 guineas. He got close to a dozen offspring, many of whom were winners. (1) Sir John Moore's Dupe (b f 1757) won several matches at Newmarket, produced Sir Frederick Evelyn's Miranda (b f 1768 Posthumous) who won at Newmarket and Ascot Heath and in turn produced, among others, Egham (b c 1780 Goldfinder), who won at Egham, Reading and Epsom. (2) Mr Dilly's Newcomb (b c 1758) won at Tetbury. (3) Sir C Sedley's Presto (b c 1763) won fifties at Newmarket, Beccles and Ipswich, as well as the Ladies Plate at York and the Royal Plate at Lichfield. (4) Mr Salt's Nestor (b c 1768) won the Ladies Plate and the Town Plate at Epsom and fifties at Reading, Egham, Barnet and Bath.
 
 
Newton's Arabian
c 1725c. Sir Michael Newton (1695c-1743), 4th bt of Barr's Court, Gloucestershire, maintained a small racing and breeding stud in the first half of the eighteenth century. He bred and raced the exceptional runner Elephant (gr c 1734) who was sufficiently successful to garner champion stallion honours for his sire, Newton's Grey Arabian (also known as Bloody Buttocks) in 1739. For more information on the Newton family and racing stable please see Owners & Breeders. This Newton's Arabian, who may have been the same horse as Newton's Bay Arabian or Newton's Grey Arabian, was the sire of three known offspring, one of whom, Ruby (ro c 1734) ran for Lady Coningsby (Sir Michael's wife) garnering second place finishes for the Ladies Plate at York, the Royal Plate at Nottingham and the Ladies Plate at Lincoln. None of the offspring bred on.
 
 
Newton's Bay Arabian
b c 1720c. Also owned by Sir Michael Newton, he may have been the same horse as Lovel's Arabian, owned by Thomas Coke (1697-1759), Lord Lovel and Earl of Leicester. Newton's Bay Arabian was used extensively in the Newton stud, getting over fifteen foals from 1729 to1734. Although relatively few of them bred on several of them did well on the turf. (1) Miss Parrot (gr f 1729) won a 100gs match at Newmarket from the Duke of Bridgewater's Patch, (2) Cricket (b c 1730) won a 100gs each sweepstakes at Newmarket, beating Lord Essex's bay filly, (3) Spot (b c 1732) won a number of races including a fifty at Tamworth beating the famous Beaver's Driver (ch c 1732 Snake), and (4) Nero (ro c 1734) won at New Malton, Grantham and Nottingham. Of those that bred on, the most famous was probably the Duke of Ancaster's Look at Me Lads (ch f 1731), an ancestress of most of Family 14. Nero, mentioned above, was sent to Ireland and there got the King's Plate winner Miss Baker (1747).
 
 
Newton's Grey Arabian 1720c
See Bloody Buttocks.
 
 
Northumberland's Arabian
c 1760c. Hugh Smithson-Percy (1714-1786), 1st Duke of Northumberland, initially had the surname of Smithson but added the name of Percy at the time he married Elizabeth, Baroness Percy, daughter of Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset. His second son, Lord Algernon Percy, was one of the owners of the Orlov Arabian, Ali Bey. The Arabian was the sire of Plato (b c 1768), Princess (br f 1769) and three unnamed fillies. (1) The first filly (gr f 1767) was the third dam of Mr Batson's Ascot Gold winner Pranks (b f 1809 Hyperion). (2) Plato won a 100gs each subsrciption at Newmarket First Spring, beating Lord Farnham's Premier (b c 1768 Squirrel). (3) The second filly (br f 1769) was the ancestress of a good part of Family 8, and has descendants that did well in Italy, including four Derby Italiano winners: Carl'Andrea (b c 1884 Andred), Filiberto (b c 1885 Scobell), Hira (b f 1894 Melton) and Kosheni (b c 1913 Galeazzo). She also has a large number of descendants in Australia and New Zealand, such as the Melbourne Cup winner King Ingoda (b c 1918 Comedy King). (4) Princess, a half sister to King Herod (b c 1758 Tartar), was the dam of Lord Grosvenor's Minimus (b c 1775 Goldfinder) who had no success on the turf. (5) The last filly has no further record.
 
 
Northumberland's Bay Arabian
b c 1760c. Also owned by the 1st Duke of Northumberland, the Arabian had five offspring in the stud book. (1) Furioso (b c 1767) won a fifty at Boroughbridge in 1771 and later ran for Mr Strode. He had no offspring. (2) unnamed colt (ch c 1781), (3) unnamed colt (b c 1781), and (4) unnamed colt (b c 1781) do not appear to have any further record. (5) Vestal (b f 1782) ran unsuccessfully at Newmarket and Stamford in 1785. She has no known offspring.
 
 
Northumberland's Brown Arabian
[Leedes Arabian] br c 1755. He was said to have been purchased from the King of Sinna in Arabia Felix and brought to England by Mr Phillips who had been sent to purchase horses by Lord Northumberland. He was a private stallion in the Earl of Northumberland's stud until 1766 then covered at Mr Leedes' North Milford stud for a fee of 5gs from 1767 until his death, around 1778. He got over a dozen known offspring and a number of them were winners. (1) Ariadne (bl f 1765), was said by the General Stud Book to have been sired by the Northumberland Bay Arabian [GSB 1:192] and by the Turf Register to have been sired by the Northumberland Brown Arabian [Pick 2:46]. She ran third for the City Plate at Durham in 1769, won by Mr Fenwick's Bernice (b f 1765 Matchem). She does not appear to have been in the stud. (2) Acteon (ro c 1762) won a fifty for Lord Ossory at Newmarket and a fifty for Sir C Bunbury at Barnet. (3) Mr Shafto's Mittimus (b c 1767) won a 100gs each sweepstakes at Newmarket, after which he ran for Mr Strode, who changed his name to Prizefighter, and won fifties at Chelmsford, Winchester, Oxford, Abingdon and Wells. (4) Sir John Douglas's Philippo (b c 1767) won the King's Plate at Carlisle in 1772 and prizes at Lancaster and Morpeth in 1773. (5) Mr Morrison's Dolly O (b f 1766), also called Creeping Molly, won a fifty at Durham in 1771. (6) Nonesuch (b c 1762) won a 200gs each sweepstakes at Newmarket. None of the offspring appear to have any further stud record.
 
 
Northumberland's Chesnut Arabian
ch c 1770c. He was the sire of around ten offspring from 1777 to 1785. A few of these, notably Valet (b c 1780) and Ophir (b c 1780), ran with minimal success and did not breed on. The remainder have no further record.
 
 
Northumberland's Golden Arabian
c 1750c. He was the sire of about half a dozen offspring from 1757 to 1763, all for the 1st Duke. Said by the General Stud Book to have been the sire of Nonsuch (b c 1762), although other sources indicate Nonsuch was sired by the Northumberland Brown Arabian [GSB 1:92, Pick 1:249, Weatherbys 1768]. None of the offspring seem to have had any success on the turf although a few of them did well in the stud. (1) An unnamed mare was the 2nd dam of the Duke of Cumberland`s Chance (br c 1780 Javelin who won a fifty at Newmarket. (2) Aurora (1757) was the dam of Bellissimo (b c 1770 Bell's Arabian) who won a fifty at Wisbech.
 
 
Northumberland's Grey Arabian
gr c 1770c. He was the sire of around half a dozen offspring from 1780 to 1783 all of them for the 1st Duke and his son, Lord Percy. All but one were unnamed and have no further record. Orator (gr c 1780) ran without success at Newmarket in 1782.
 
 
No-Tongued Barb 1695c
See King William's Black Barb.
 
 
Oglethorpe's Arabian 1680c
 
 
Ogle's Barb
c 1735c. This horse does not appear in the American Stud Book. Fairfax Harrison speculates that he was brought from the Mediterranean area, along with the Barb called Spanker, around 1740. The earliest known Barb to belong to Maryland Governor Samuel Ogle (1694-1752), he covered at Ogle's Bellair stud in Prince George's County. His most notable descendant was Tyler's Driver (br c 1758c Othello*).
 
 
Orford Barb
br c 1750c. Robert Walpole (1701-1751), 2nd Earl of Orford, was the eldest son of Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole. He had owned an earlier Orford Turk, who was also known as the Walpole Barb (gr c 1715c). His son George Walpole (1730-1791), 3rd Earl of Orford, served as Lord of the Bedchamber to both King George II and King George III. Either one or both of them was known to have at least two Barbs, one brown and on grey, the brown appearing to be older than the grey. The brown was possibly the sire of an unnamed mare (f 1759c) who bred several winners. (1) Mr C Blake's Piper (b c 1766 Captain) won a 500gs match at Newmarket from Lord Clermont's Brilliant as well as several other plates. (2) Sir J Moore's Houghton (b c 1773 Squirrel) won the Gentlemen's Purse at Northampton along with several plates and matches. (3) Mr Walker's Spitfire (br c 1777 Eclipse) was perhaps the most successful runner, winning matches, plates and prizes over a three year turf career. (4) Only one of the offspring, Mariannina (f 1774 Snap) bred on, producing the winner Ospray (br c 1784 Highflyer).
 
 
Orford Turk 1720c
See Walpole Barb.
 
 
Orford Turk
c 1745c. He could possibly be the same horse as one of the Orford Barbs. Probably owned by both the 2nd and 3rd Earls, this Turk was the sire of five known offspring. (1) William Crofts Bauble (bu f 1750c) was unplaced for a fifty at Epsom in 1754. (2) Commoner (c 1750c) was advertised to cover at Yarm, Yorkshire, for a fee of guinea. (3) Of all of them, only an unnamed mare (bu f 1750c), bred on, producing Sir John Moore's South Colt (gr c 1763c).
 
 
Orlov Arabian
ch c 1765c. Also spelled Orlow and Orloff. He was owned by Ralph Williamson, to whom he was presented by Count Alexey Grigoryevich Orlov. One of three Arabians (the others were Ali Bey and Count Orloff) who were sent to England by Count Orlov, he was described as a remarkably beautiful chesnut Arabian of the highest racing blood, fourteen and a half hands high, with very great bone, free from blemish and perfectly sound. He covered at James Ward's Livery Stables in Liverpool, for a fee of 5gs. He left no known offspring.
 
 
Osberton Arabian
c 1685c. Owned by Sir Littleton Osbaldeston (1630-1692), 1st bt, his only known offspring was Champion (c 1695c), one of the stallions holding court in the stud of Robert Bertie (1660-1723), 1st Duke of Ancaster. Champion was the sire of the stallion Old Pert (c 1705c) and his sister. Old Pert got, among others, Young Lady Mare (ch f 1715c), one of the foundation mares of Family 14, and Pert (ch c 1719), also called Buckhunter, who was a winner for the Duke at Alford, Newark on Trent, Grantham and Peterborough. Sister to Pert produced the Ancaster Brisk (b c 1737 Cinnamon), who won fifties at Stamford, Huntingdon and Chesterfield, as well as the Gold Cup at Westchester, and Valiant (b c 1747 Grasshopper) who was sent to Virginia and there contributed to the development of American bloodstock.
 
 
Ossory's Arabian
ch c 1765c. John FitzPatrick (1745-1818), 2nd Earl of Upper Ossory, County Cork, Ireland, served as Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire and had property there at Ampthill Park. He was a noted turf aficionado, having bred or owned such horses as Otho (b c 1760 Moses) and Dorimant (ch c 1772 Otho). The Arabian covered at Ampthill Park for a fee of 5 guineas. Of his five known offspring, only one, Lord Grosvenor's Selima (1772), was named, however none of them has any further record.
 
 
Ovington's Grey Arabian
gr c 1720c. He was possibly the same horse as Bloody Buttocks (gr c 1720c). Thomas and William Ovington, of Cowling, near Bedale, Yorkshire, between them owned a number of important early horses, such as the Bald Galloway, Flying Whigg and Roxana. Bloody Buttocks, along with the Bald Galloway and a brother to Childers, were on offer at the sale of the late William Ovington in 1727. Bloody Buttocks was said to have been purchased by John Crofts and Mr Hartley. The Arabian has only one known offspring, Mr Hartley's unnamed mare (1727) from his Holderness Turk Mare. She does not appear to have any further record.
 
 
Oxford Dun Arabian
bu c 1710c. Sire Line Oxford Dun Arabian.
 
 
Oxlade Arabian 1764
See Dowla.
 
 
Oysterfoot Arabian
c 1700c. Sire Line Oysterfoot Arabian.
 
 
Paget Arabian [Paget Turk] b c 1697c
 
 
Panton's Arabian
gr c 1750c. Thomas Panton (1731-1808) of Fen Ditton, Cambridgeshire, was the son of Thomas Panton (1697-1782), the latter the Keeper of the King's Running Horses at Newmarket to both King George I and King George II. In 1750 his sister Mary married Peregrine Bertie (1714-1778), 3rd Duke of Ancaster. He was a well known and apparently universally-liked racehorse rider and owner, a member of the Jockey Club, and he won the Derby with Noble (b c 1783 Highflyer) in 1786. The Arabian was described as a horse of great size and strength and perfectly sound and healthy. He stood 15 hands and was reputed to get large foals who were good goers. He covered at Newmarket for a fee of 10 guineas and later for John Knevett of Eye, Suffolk, for a fee of £1. It is possible that he was the same horse as the Ancaster Arabian (1745c) who got only one foal for the 3rd Duke in 1752. He is credited with about thirty offspring, from 1755 to 1768, the best known probably Virago (gr f 1760), dam of Sir Thomas Gascoigne's St Leger winner Hollandaise (gr f 1775 Matchem). Virago was also the dam of Gunilda (gr f 1777 Star), who was sent to Virginia and was the ancestress of such horses as Kentucky Derby winner Spokane (ch c 1886 Hyder Ali), Preakness Stakes winner Shirley (b g 1873 Lexington) and Belmont Stakes winner Joe Daniels (ch c 1869 Australian).
 
 
Panton's Chesnut Arabian
ch c 1760c. Evidently less popular than Panton's Grey Arabian, the Chesnut Arabian got only one known offspring, Shamster (b c 1768), from the Duke of Ancaster's Ruth (b f 1761 Blank). Shamster ran at Newmarket without success in 1773.
 
 
Parker's Arabian 1775c
See Boringdon Arabian.
 
 
Parsons's Barb 1695c
See Thoulouse Barb.
 
 
Patshull Arabian 1795c
See Pigot Grey Arabian.
 
 
Pegasus
c 1860c. Probably owned by Mr V Crook of Victoria, Pegasus was said to have been imported from England. He sired Mr Crooke's Australian Cup and Hotham Handicap winner Saladin (gr g 1865). Saladin ran two dead heats before winning the Australian Cup and ran third for the Melbourne Cup but was unplaced by the steward.
 
 
Pelham's Bay Arabian 1675c
See Spanker.
 
 
Pelham's Barb 1681c
See Curwen's Bay Barb.
 
 
Pelham's White Barb 1712c
See Alcock's Arabian.
 
 
Pembroke's Arabian 1767c
See Ali Bey.
 
 
Pennington's Barb
c 1780c. Sir Joseph Pennington (1718-1793), 4th bt of Muncaster, Cumberland, was married to Margaret, the daughter of John Lowther, 1st Viscount Lonsdale. The Barb is credited with one daughter, Violet (1787), from Sir Joseph's Hambleton Royal Plate winner Creeping Kate (ch f 1765 Babraham Blank), however, she had no known offspring.
 
 
Pensacola
[Appalusia] gr c 1780c. A Spanish horse sent to Virginia in 1788 he was owned by Captain Jose Jones. He was said to be perfectly white in colour except for his blue ears. He sired Americus (b c 1792) and his sister who was the dam of Wild Medley (gr c 1805 Tayloe's Mendoza). He died around 1799c.
 
 
Percy's Bay Arabian 1767c
See Ali Bey.
 
 
Philippo's Arabian
c 1780c. He was advertised by Mr Baker at Belgrave, near Leicester, and later by the Hon Charles William Wyndham (1760-1828), son of the 2nd Earl of Egremont, to cover at Birstall, near Leicester, for a fee of 5 guineas. He is credited with nearly ten offspring in the stud book, the most notable of whom was Lord Barrymore's Jerico (b c 1786). Jerico ran for three years, mostly at Newmarket, where he won a fair number of matches. Neither he nor the others appear to have had any success in the stud.
 
 
Philipson's Turk
c 1745c. Said to be owned by Sir John Philipson [Pick 1:391], he got two known offspring: the Duke of Cleveland's Charon (b c 1749) and his sister. In the General Stud Book Charon's sire is noted as Philipson's Turk [GSB 1:83] and in the Racing Register as Phillips's Turk [Baily 1:119]. However, other racing calendars appear to be in agreement that his sire was Philipson's Turk [Pond, Heber 1754 &c]. Charon won fifties at Bishop-Auckland, Richmond and Hull, as well as the Ladies Plate at Lincoln. Sister to Charon foaled the 1767 Doncaster Cup winner Meaburn (b c 1761 Mirza).
 
 
Phillips's Arabian 1740c
 
 
Phillips's Brown Turk
br c 1745c. He was said to have been purchased from the stud of the "Grand Signor" and imported from Turcomania by Samuel Phillips of Garenton, Leicestershire. Described as a fine brown stallion standing about 15 hands 1 inch, he was advertised to cover in Leicestershire by Mr Bakewell of Dishley, near Loughborough, for a fee of 1 guinea. He is the sire of only one known offspring, Borlase Warren's unnamed mare (b f 1750c), a half sister to Warren's Camillus (b c 1748 Cullen Arabian).
 
 
Phillips's Grey Turk
[Phillips's Arabian] gr c 1736c. This horse does not appear in the General Stud Book. Said to have been brought from Turcomania by William Phillips of Garenton, Leicestershire, the horse was described as a beautiful grey standing nearly 15 hands, and thought to be exceedingly strong, a fine mover, and to possess a just proportion. He was advertised by Joseph Knowles of Nelson, near Market-Bosworth, to cover in Leicestershire for a fee of 2 guineas. He has no known offspring.
 
 
Pigot Grey Arabian
[Patshull Arabian] gr c 1795c. The Arabian was owned by either or both Sir Robert Pigot (1720-1796), 2nd bt of Patshull, a career army officer who inherited the extensive Patshull estate in Staffordshire in 1777, and his son, Sir George Pigot (1766-1841), 3rd bt. Sir George is credited as breeder of most of the Arabian's known offspring. The Arabian was described as a "native of Bussora and of the truest Anissa Negadi breed" and said to be of good size, particularly fine shape and great bone. His stock were also described as being of great size. He covered at Patshull for a fee of 2 guineas. Of nearly a dozen offspring only two were named: Mr Whitmore's Marianne (b f 1803) and General Sir George Pigot (c 1800c). Marianne ran without success at Bridgenorth and General Sir George Pigot was apparently a highly regarded half bred who covered at Wentworth Castle for a fee of 2gs.
 
 
Pigot Turk
[Mostyn's Bay Barb] b c 1710c. Seemingly confused in the General Stud Book with the Paget Arabian, he is more likely to have been the same horse as the Mostyn Bay Barb, and the General Stud Book notes, in the pedigree of the Pigot Turk Mare, that she was "bred by Sir R. Mostyn, got by his Bay Barb (afterwards called the Pigot Turk)" [GSB 1:156]. The barb was apparently first owned by Sir Roger Mostyn (1675-1739), 3rd baronet, who held seats at Mostyn in Flintshire, Gloddaith in Carnarvonshire, Leighton in Cheshire and Maesmynnan in Denbighshire. Sir Roger served in parliament from 1701 to 1734. His appointments included pay master of marine forces to Her Majesty Queen Anne and teller of the exchequer to His Majesty King George I. Pigot Turk got four known offspring, the first two for John Egerton of Cheshire. (1) Pigot Turk Mare has no year of birth or colour given in the stud book, however Mr Egerton raced a chesnut filly at Black Hambleton in 1720 who finished 6th for His Majesty's Gold Cup for five year old mares and she could conceivably be this mare. In the stud she bred four offspring for Mr Egerton, all unnamed although a Terror colt could have been Mr Egerton's Byerly who ran in 1728. (2) Egerton Nanny (gr f 1724) won the Wallasey Stakes at Chester and the King's Plate at Hambleton in 1729 and the King's Plate at Newmarket in 1730. She had descendants nearly to the turn of the century. (3) and (4) Looby (b c 1725c), owned by Lord Derby, may have been the same horse as Sidebotham's Horse. Looby sired several offspring for Mr Egerton, including Romp (b f 1739), the second dam of the York Royal Plate winner Aurelianus (ro c 1760 Attilus) and the Doncaster Cup winner Forester (b c 1765 Dionysius). Sidebotham's stallion got the Earl of Tankerville's Chance and possibly the Wynn Looby (b g 1730c).
 
 
Pigot Arabian 1760c
See Coombe Arabian.
 
 
Portland's Arabian
c 1710c. William Henry Bentinck (1682-1726), 1st Duke of Portland, styled Viscount Woodstock from 1689, inherited vast estates, including Bulstrode Park in Buckinghamshire and Theobalds on the Hertfordshire-Middlesex border. Portland's Arabian was the sire of two known offspring. His son Shagg (b c 1719), bred by Thomas Grosvenor, is said to have won 200gs at Wallasey and 200£ at Newmarket. His daughter was the dam of Lord Chedworth's Moses (ch c 1746 Howe's Foxhunter), winner of a fifty at Burford in 1750 and later a stallion in Lord Gower's stud.
 
 
Place's White Turk 1670c
 
 
Pulleine's Chesnut Arabian
[Pulleyne's Chesnut Arabian] ch c 1690c. Sire Line Pulleine's Chesnut Arabian. Thomas Pulleine (1652c-1724), of Carlton Hall, near Richmond, Yorkshire, was Master of the Stud to King William III, and High Sheriff of Yorkshire in 1697 and 1704. The Arabian did relatively well in the stud, getting: (1) An unnamed mare (1695c), dam of Mr Gage's Lightfoot (gr f 1706c Curwen Bay Barb) who won the Galloways Plate at York in 1712, and ancestress of, among others, the Hambleton Royal Plate winner Alipes (bbr f 1757 Regulus), (2) the Ancaster Merlin (ch c 1700c), a stallion in the stud of the first and second Dukes of Ancaster, (3) Old Lady (1705c), the second dam of Bolton Starling (gr c 1727 Bay Bolton), (4) an unnamed mare (1695c) who was the third dam of Sir Marmaduke Wyvill's Garnet (b c 1738 Young Belgrade) who won fifties at Stockton, Morpeth and Warwick, (5) an unnamed mare (1705c), the ancestress of Henry Fletcher's Trifle (b c 1748 Juba) and Sir Henry Grey's Fox (b c 1751 Locust); Trifle won fifties at Richmond and Doncaster after which he was purchased by Thomas Newenham and ran with much success in Ireland; Fox won fifties at Bishop-Auckland and Newcastle along with the King's Plate at Ipswich, (6) An unnamed colt (1710c) who sired the second dam of Mr Smith-Barry's Belmont (b c 1759 Young Cade), a winner at Middleham, Wakefield, York, and of the gold Cup at Chester in 1764, and (7) Blackatop (1710c), sire of Jervaulx Blackatop, Castaway and the Parsons Gelding.
 
 
Pulleine's White Arabian
gr c 1685c. Highflyer suggests that he was the same horse as Rockwood and that he was the sire of a horse called the Layton Grey Barb (gr c 1690c). He got Rockwood Colt (1690c), who may have been the Layton Grey Barb, who sired the second dam of the York Royal Plate winner Cottingham (ch c 1735 Hartley's Blind Horse) and the third dam of Hutton's Wormwood (b c 1739). Wormwood was described as a bright bay standing 15 hands, who covered for Anthony Clough in Derby for a fee of 1 guinea in 1751. A sister to Wormwood had descendants in the stud book as late as the early nineteenth century, including Mr Wentworth's Silverheel (b c 1802 Hambletonian) who won a sweepstakes at Catterick Bridge.
 
 
Radcliffe's Arabian
c 1755c. The Arabian was the sire of two unnamed foals of 1763, one for Lord Surrey and one for Lord Northumberland, in the stud book. Charles Howard (1746-1815), Lord Surrey and later 11th Duke of Norfolk, bred or owned around a dozen race horses in the latter half of the 18th century. Hugh Smithson-Percy (1714-1786), 1st Duke of Northumberland, maintained an extensive racing and breeding establishment during the same time period. Lord Northumberland's bay colt by the Radcliffe Arabian finished 5th and last for a 200gs each sweepstakes at Newmarket in 1767. Neither of the Radcliffe Arabian foals bred on.
 
 
Ranger 1762
See Lindsey's Arabian.
 
 
Richmond's Turk
c 1700c. Sire Line Richmond Turk. He was owned by Charles Lennox (1672-1723), 1st Duke of Richmond and Lennox, son of King Charles II and his mistress Louise de Kerouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth. At the age of eight the young Duke won a match at Newmarket, defeating Bob Killigrewes' horse, "neither much heigher than an Irish greyhound," over a mile, with both horses ridden by their owners. At the age of ten he was appointed Master of the Horse to the King although the execution of the office devolved upon commissioners, Major Theophilus Oglethorpe, Henry Guy and Charles Adderley, until the Duke reached the age of fourteen. However, the prior death of the King occasioned his removal from office. In 1692 he married Anne, sister of George Brudenell, 3rd Earl of Cardigan. He acquired Goodwood for use as a hunting lodge in 1697. Very little else is known of the Richmond Turk other than that he got the Cardigan Colt.
 
 
Richards Arabian 1700c
See Conyers Arabian.
 
 
Rider's Chesnut Barb 1695c
See St. Victor's Barb.
 
 
Roan Barb 1725c
 
 
Robinson’s Barb
[possibly Lister’s Snake] c 1708c. He was probably owned in Yorkshire by Mr Robinson at Easby, near Richmond, who maintained a large breeding and racing stud in the early part of the eighteenth century and was associated with such horses as Old Country Wench (gr f 1712 Lister’s Snake), Easby Snake (ch c 1721 Lister’s Snake) and Grey Robinson (gr f 1723 Bald Galloway), the dam of Regulus (b c 1739 Godolphin Arabian). John Robinson appears to have been a cousin to John Bartlet, the owner of Bartlet’s Childers (b c 1716 Darley Arabian). The Barb’s only known offspring was an unnamed mare, the dam of Look About You (gr c 1734 Robinson Crusoe), a winner of the Royal Plate at Edinburgh in 1740 as well as several other plates in the north.
 
 
Rockingham's Arabian
c 1760c. Owned by Charles Watson-Wentworth (1730-1782), 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, he may have been the same horse as the Saanah Arabian. He was the sire of three unnamed offspring, two colts and one filly, from 1768 to 1776, none of whom appear further in bloodstock records.
 
 
Rockwood (GB)
gr c 1685c (Darcy's White Turk - Tregonwell's Natural Barb Mare). Sire Line Darcy's White Turk. Family 1. Based on the fact that his dam was mated with the White Turk to produce the White Turk Mare of Family 1 we speculate that he was also sired by the White Turk. Highflyer suggests that he was the same horse as Pulleine's White Turk. The General Stud Book records his pedigree as: Rockwood, Pulleine's, out of the Lonsdale Tregonwell Barb Mare [GSB 1/5:382]. He sired the unnamed third dam of Bolton Starling (gr c 1727 Bay Bolton). One or more sons (possibly called the Layton Grey Barb) of Rockwood, appear in the pedigrees of Mr Hutton's Wormwood (b c 1739 Blacklegs), Mr Constable's Cottingham (ch c 1735 Hartley's Blind Horse) and Mr Metcalfe's Harlequin (b c 1719 Mixbury Galloway). Rockwood died between 1699 and 1706 [ER:125].
 
 
Rooksby's Turk
c 1715c. Owned by Captain Rooksby (sometimes spelled Rookesby or Rouksby), who raced Dragon and Mopsy in the mid 1720s, the Turk may have covered at Hampton Court. He was the sire of, among others, Merry Tom (c 1725c) and an unnamed mare (said to be a sister to the dam of Sir William Blackett's Bold Thirkeld although this seems doubtful), the dam of Wiberforce Read's Lucy (b f 1732 Smiling Tom). Lucy was the dam of at least three winners, Whitefoot (b c 1746 Childers Colt), Singlepeeper (b c 1748 Regulus) and Grandison (b c 1750 Sloe), and the grandam of Scrub (b c 1751 Blaze). Wilberforce Read, of Grimthorpe, near Market Weighton in Yorkshire, was a member of the Jockey Club and said to be a "gentleman of good family but small means". Lucy won the King's Plate at Hambleton in 1736 defeating Mr Brewster's Miss Patty and 10 others. She also won plates at Stockton, Sunderland and Pontrefact. Whitefoot won a fifty at Newton in 1752. Singlepeeper won fifties at Follifoot in 1753 and at Knutsford in 1754 as well as the annual plate at Kipling Coates in 1755. Grandison won fifties at New Malton in 1754, at Hull in 1755, at Bedall in 1756 and the annual plate at Kipling Coates in 1757.
 
 
Rumbold's Arabian
gr c 1780c. Possibly owned by Sir Thomas Rumbold (1736-91), 1st bt of Woodhall, Hertfordshire, who served as Governor of Madras from 1777 to 1780, the Arabian was the sire of four stud book offspring. Three of these were unnamed and belonged to Mr Bullock, HRH the Prince of Wales and Lord G H Cavendish. The fourth, called Nabob (gr c 1787), ran for Mr Bullock at Newmarket in 1789, finishing 3rd of three for a 50gs each sweepstakes, won by Lord Barrymore's Skewball (ch f 1786 Tandem). None of these have any further bloodstock record.
 
 
Rutland's Arabian
c 1780c. Owned by Charles Manners (1754-1787), 4th Duke of Rutland, he was the sire of one unnamed colt (b c 1787) from Sir John Moore's Isabella (bu f 1765 Young Cade). The colt left no further record.
 
 
Rutland's Black Barb
bl c 1705c. Owned by John Manners (1638-1711), 1st Duke of Rutland, he sired three unnamed daughters. The first daughter was the dam of the Confederate Filly (f 1718c Grey Grantham) and thus contributed to the development of Family 61. The second daughter was the ancestress of numerous descendants, the most famous probably being Captain Hartley's Whitefoot (ch c 1729 Bloody Buttocks), winner of Royal Plates at Edinburgh and Newmarket. The third daughter was the ancestress of the Duke of Cumberland's Chance (br c 1780 Javelin), winner of a 100gs match at Newmarket as a two year old.
 
 
Rutland's Grey Turk
gr c 1705c. Highflyer speculates that he was the same horse as the Acaster Turk (gr c 1695c) and the Duke of Rutland's Coneyskins (gr c 1712). Probably owned by both John Manners (1638-1711), 1st Duke of Rutland, and John Manners (1676-1721), 2nd Duke of Rutland, the Turk was advertised for sale in 1714-15 by his then owner, Henry Carter, at the "Sign of the Faulcon near Enfield, in Staffordshire". He appears to have covered in Yorkshire prior to this. Of four unnamed daughters, three bred on. The first foaled Ellerker's Snake (ch c 1721 Lister's Snake), bred by Mr Robinson of Easby, then sold to Mr White and Mr Ellerker. He won a plate at York prior to entering Mr Ellerker's stud at Hart, near Hartepoole, Durham, where he covered for a fee of 1 guinea. He was described as standing 14 hands 3 inches, and to be very strong, well proportioned and perfectly sound. He achieved some success in the stud, getting, among others, the King's Plate winner Miss Hendry (gr f 1730). The second foaled Cuthbert Routh's Creeper (gr f 1716 Darcy's Woodcock), who was bred by Lord Darcy, and was noticed in Routh's stud book [ER:26]. The third was the ancestress of Lord Surrey's, later HRH Prince of Wales's, Cumberland (br c 1779 Phlegon), winner of the Royal Plate at York in 1785.
 
 
Rycote Arabian 1763c
See Gregory's Grey Arabian.
 
 
Sanaah Arabian
c 1760c. He may be the same horse as Rockingham's Arabian. He was the sire of more than half a dozen offspring in the stud book, most of them for Charles Watson-Wentworth (1730-1782), 2nd Marquess of Rockingham. His best runners were Stoic (br c 1768), Mareschal (br c 1770) and Wentworth (b c 1770). Stoic, campaigned by Lord Orford, won two matches at Newmarket, worth 100gs and 200gs, along with a fifty at Peterborough. Mareschal, campaigned first by Mr Blake, then by Lord Clermont, had several good wins, including defeating Lord Foley's esteemed Pumpkin (ch c 1769 Matchem) for a 500gs match, and Lord Clermont's equally esteemed Priestess (b f 1767 Matchem) for a 500gs match, both at Newmarket, however after his purchase by Lord Clermont, Mareschal seems to have lost his form. Wentworth, owned by Lord Clermont, won a 200gs match from Mr Vernon's sister to Minima (gr f 1770 Coombe Arabian) and a 50gs match from Mr Fox`s Cunegonde (b f 1769 Blank), both matches at Newmarket. None of the offspring bred on beyond another generation.
 
 
Satellite
b c 1815c. An Arabian imported into Australia in 1822 or 1823 as an aged horse, he was said to have become the principal sire of that colony and to have been the stallion from which the Waler breed descends. He was described as a small bay stallion who got stock that was powerful, sound, and possessed of bottomless stamina and whose sons bred on. He sired Aspic (f 1830c) the taproot mare of Colonial Family C29 and Matilda (gr f 1835c) the taproot mare of Colonial Family c57.
 
 
Scawing's Arabian
c 1730c. Nothing is yet known of this horse. His unnamed daughter (1736c) was the dam of Bucephalus (gr c 1746c Bumblebee) and the grandam of Dove* (gr c 1756 Young Cade). Bred in Yorkshire by Thomas Jackson, Bucephalus does not seem to have had a turf career. He was described as extraordinarily strong, beautiful, well made and a good mover. Owned by Amos Alexander, he covered at Toftmonks, Norfolk, for a fee of 1 guinea. Dove was also bred by Thomas Jackson and ran unsuccessfully at Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1761. He was exported to America and achieved some success as a stallion there. He covered at Dr Thomas Hamilton's Mount Calvert Manor in Price George's County, Maryland. He later covered in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, finally returning to Maryland in 1774.
 
 
Sebright's Arabian
c 1740c. Sir John Sebright (1725-1794), 6th Bt, of Besford, Worcester, was a career army officer, rising to the rank of Lieutenant-General, and later represented Bath, from 1763 to 1766, in the House of Commons. The Arabian sired an unnamed mare (1745c) who heads Family 52. Her descendants include Whip (b c 1794) who became successful as a stallion in America, the Irish Derby winner Killeagh (b c 1903 Killyleagh), the July Cup winner Mickey the Greek (b c 1934 Apple Sammy), the Goodwood Cup and Chester Cup winner Dark Japan (bbr c 1923 Dark Legend) and more recently, the Breeders' Cup Turf winner Buck's Boy (b g 1993 Bucksplasher).
 
 
Sedbury Turk 1670c
 
 
Sedley Arabian
[Compton Barb] gr c 1760c. The General Stud Book notes that "The COMPTON BARB, more commonly called the Sedley Arabian, was the sire of Coquette, Greyling, etc [GSB 1:393]". He was first owned by Henry Compton of Hampshire, a member of the Jockey Club and a "gentleman-jockey" who attained success at Newmarket. He was later owned by Sir Charles Sedley (1721-1778), 2nd bt, and sometime owner of the famous horse Trentham (b c 1766 Sweepstakes), who maintained a bloodstock stable from around 1735 onwards. His principal seat was at Nuttall Temple in Nottinghamshire and he represented Nottingham in parliament for several years. The horse covered at Bisterne in Hampshire, and later at Nuttall Temple for a fee of 3 guineas that rose to 5 guineas. He is credited with about twenty offspring in the stud book. His daughters are responsible for his heritage with the most significant probably being Coquette (b f 1765) a superb racemare and the ancestress of most of Family 11, Sister to Greyling (gr f 1769) the ancestress of most of Family 29, and an unnamed mare who became the 2nd dam of Lurcher (b c 1789 Dungannon).
 
 
Selaby Turk
[Marshall Turk] c 1680c. Sire Line Selaby Turk.
 
 
Selim
gr c 1795. Probably owned by Mr Dent who was credited with most of his offspring, he covered at Ainderby Steeple for a fee of 5 guineas from 1800 to 1806. He was described as a dapple grey Arabian standing "full 14 hands and a half high" and his offspring, both bloodstock and "country stock" were said to be uncommonly stout and promising. He got more than half a dozen foals in the stud book, two of whom, Sir Charles (b c 1801) and Young Selim (gr c 1803), were also advertised to cover at the same place. Sir Charles appears to have had some success, getting the the Duke of Hamilton's stallion Symmetry (b c 1808) who was sent to Russia in 1815 [GSB 2:57].
 
 
Sepoy
c 1835c. An Arabian imported into Australia from India, he sired the stallion Plenipo (1843) from the mare Pet, by Bolivar, the latter imported by the Cressy Company of Tasmania in 1826.
 
 
Shaftesbury Turk
gr c 1675c. The Turk was owned by Anthony Ashley Cooper (1621-1683), 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, an eminent politician who, steering by his own personal compass, served both commonwealth and king in many capacities including that of MP for Wiltshire in 1660 and 1661 and Lord Lieutenant of his native Dorset from 1672 to 1674. A patron of John Locke, he collaborated with that worthy to write the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina. In 1681 he was charged with high treason, spending some time in the Tower before the charges were dismissed, and on his release fled to the Netherlands. During his incarceration he determined to sell off his bloodstock although the Turk, referred to as "my Arabian," was not in his sales list. The Turk is credited with one offspring in the General Stud Book, Lord Lonsdale's Counsellor (c 1685c), the sire of Darcy's Counsellor (c 1690c). He also got the dam of Grey Layton (gr f 1700c) who appears in the Duke of Newcastle's stud book [ER:114].
 
 
Shafto's Barb
c 1750c. Probably owned by one or both of the Shafto brothers (Robert and Jennison) of West Wratting, Cambridgeshire, the Barb was the sire of a half dozen or so unnamed offspring. Only one of them, not in the stud book but from a mare owned by Robert, bred on for a few generations resulting in Lord Foley's Mongrel (b c 1788 Phoenomenon).
 
 
Shebdeez
bl c 1815c. Described as an Arabian, he covered at Eaton, near Chester, for a fee of 5gs, along with the Derby winner Blucher (b c 1811 Waxy). His daughter, Medina (br f 1824), was the dam of the stallion Abbas Mirza (bl c 1831 Camel) and the ancestress of the 1854 Stewards' Cup winner Pumicestone (b c 1851 Cotherstone).
 
 
Sheik
gr c 1810c. Said to be an Arabian imported into New South Wales, he has two offspring, both fillies. Smith's Agnes (1820c) was the ancestress of the 1872 Australian Cup winner Saladin (gr g 1865 Pegasus). Another unnamed filly (1820c) was the ancestress of Sir Watkin (c 1845c Egremont), who was the damsire of another Sir Watkin (br c 1860 Purston).
 
 
Sheik Twiney
[Cooke's Arabian] c 1790c. Owned by Bryan Cooke, of Wheatley Hall, Doncaster, Yorkshire, he covered at Richard Goodison's Stables, Newmarket, for a fee of 5gs. Said to be a present from a Prince at Bussorah, Persia, to the British Resident there, he was described as a most beautiful pure Mountain Arab, with great bone and remarkably fine action. Sheik Twiney got two offspring, a colt (b c 1805) and a filly (1805) for his owner. Neither have any turf or produce record.
 
 
Shelley's Barb
c 1765c. The Barb was owned by Sir John Shelley (1692-1771), 4th bt, of Michel Grove, Sussex, who represented Arundel and Lewes in parliament, and probably by Sir John Shelley (1730-1783), 5th bt, who represented East Retford and Newark. He appears to have been the first acquisition for the breeding and racing stud of the Shelley family, which was developed by the 5th bt. The Barb sired an unnamed filly (1771) who did not breed on.
 
 
Slit Ear'd Barb 1730c
 
 
Smith-Barry's Arabian
ch c 1785c. The horse belonged to the Hon John Smith-Barry (1725-1784c), of Fota Island, County Cork, and Marbury Hall, Cheshire, who maintained a large breeding and racing stud which was associated with such horses as the Doncaster Cup and Chester Cup winner Forester (b c 1765 Dionysius) and the Royal Plate winners Ragamuffin (gr c 1766 Northumberland) and All Fours (ch c 1763 Regulus). The Arabian was the sire of one unnamed colt (ch c 1789) for his owner. His dam died during foaling [GSB 1:336].
 
 
Smith's Arabian
c 1770c. The Arabian was probably owned by Jockey Club member, General Richard Smith (1734-1803) of Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire, MP for Wendover and Sheriff of Berkshire in 1779 and 1780. The Arabian got four unnamed offspring, three colts and one filly, all for the General. None of them appear to have raced or bred on.
 
 
Somerset's Arabian 1713
 
 
South Barb 1735c
 
 
Spanker (GB)
b c 1675c (Darcy's Yellow Turk - Old Morocco Mare, by Fairfax Morocco Barb). Sire Line Darcy's Yellow Turk. Family 6.
 
 
Spanker
c 1735c. Sire Line Spanker. A Barb horse imported into Virginia from Andalusia, Spain, in 1740 by Mr Nelson, he was also referred to as Nelson's imported Spanish Horse. He was described as a most beautiful horse although his color was not specified. His daughters were noted for breeding speedy colts and fillies, especially when crossed with bred horses like Janus. He stood in Virginia at Nelson's stud until 1750 then went to North Carolina.
 
 
Stanyans Arabian 1700c
 
 
St. Victor's Barb
[Rider's Chesnut Barb] ch c 1695c. Sire Line St. Victor's Barb. He sired Bald Galloway, Rider's Cupid and Points. Bald Galloway in turn sired Cartouch, Grey Robinson (gr f 1723) and Roxana (ch f 1718). Grey Robinson became the dam of Regulus (b c 1739) who was a Champion Sire five times between 1754 and 1766. Roxana became the dam of Cade (b c 1734) who was Champion Sire five times between 1752 and 1760 and sired Matchem (b c 1748) the progenitor of one of the only three tail-male lines which exist today. His most famous descendant is Man o' War (ch c 1917). Roxana was also the dam of Lath (b c 1732) and Roundhead (sorrel c 1733). Rider's Cupid sired the 4th dam of Fellow (ch c 1757). Points became the 2nd dam of both Amorett [Little Hartley Mare] (ch f 1727) and Sachrissa [Large Hartley Mare] (ch f 1729).
 
 
Stamford's Turk
[Crawford Turk] br c 1740c. Imported by John Lindsay (1702-1749), 20th Earl of Crawford, one of the founding members of the Highland regiment which later formed part of the Black Watch, he was purchased by Mr Stamford after the death of Lord Crawford. Said to be a beautiful strong brown Turk standing 15 hands, he covered at Newmarket for a fee of 1 guinea. He was the sire of two colts, Lord Portmore's General (b c 1748), winner of fifties at Beccles and Chipping Norton, and Mr Horn's Turk (c 1750), winner of a fifty at Warwick. His daughter, Mr Keck's Aura (b f 1745), produced the winners Juniper (b c 1752 Babraham) and Genius (b c 1753 Babraham), the first a stallion in America, and the second a stallion in England. Aura was also the 3rd dam of Sir C Turner's Weathercock (b c 1786 Ruler) who was sent to Russia in 1802.
 
 
Stahremberg Turk 1715
See Lexington Grey Arabian.
 
 
Storey's Arabian
c 1790c. Owned by Mr Storey, his known progeny consists of Blackett (b c 1797) and his brother (b c 1798). Blacket finished 3rd and last for the 100gs Gold Cup at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, won by Mr Johnson's Royal Plate winner Sir Solomon (b c 1796 Sir Peter Teazle) in 1802. The brother cannot be found in the racing calendars and neither appear to have bred on. The brothers were from a Fortitude Mare bred by Lord Grosvenor and owned by Mr Stirling.
 
 
Stradling Turk 1682c
 
 
Strickland's Turk 1712c
 
 
Sultan Mahomet
[Gray's Inn Arabian] b c 1770c. He was the sire of Lord Melbourne's unnamed mare (b f 1776) from Lord Ossory's mare, Grace (b f 1769 Snap). Peniston Lamb (1745-1828), 1st Viscount Melbourne, represented Ludgershall, Malmesbury and Newport, Isle of Wight in parliament. He was married to Elizabeth, daughter of the notable breeder Sir Ralph Milbanke (1689-1748), 4th bt. Sultan Mahomet was described as an exceedingly fine Arabian of the true "Gilfee" breed. He was said to have stood about 14 hands 3 inches high and to have a very fine shape and uncommonly fine action and use of his limbs. Without blemish he was recommended as having sufficient bone to get King's Plate horses. He covered at Field's Livery Stables for a fee of 10gs. There is no further record of offspring from Sultan Mahomet.
 
 
Sutton's Grey Arabian
gr c 1715c. General Richard Sutton (1674-1737) of Scofton, Nottinghamshire, was MP for Newark, army officer and governor of Hull and Guernsey. General Sutton, called Brigadier Sutton in the Ancaster stud book MS [ER:82], was the brother of Sir Robert Sutton (1671-1746), the ambassador to Constantinople from 1702 to 1717. The Arabian covered from 1725 to 1730, getting three foals for Peregrine Bertie (1686-1742), the 2nd Duke of Ancaster, and Mr Southcote's Miss Fortune (ch f 1730c) who won a 30gs purse at Lincoln. Only one of the Duke's offspring produced further, she being the 2nd dam of Mr Hawes Lady Thigh (ch f 1760 Young Merlin) who won the Ladies Plate at Guildford and two fifties at Odsey in 1764 and had descendants as late as the turn of the century.
 
 
Sutton's Turk
c 1715c. Owned by William Cavendish (1673-1729), the 2nd Duke of Devonshire [GSB 1:392], he may have been the same horse as the Devonshire Turk whom the Duke gave to the Earl of Winchelsea. It is possible that he was the chesnut brought from Turkey along with Sutton's Grey Arabian and described as a "true Arabian". He was advertised to cover at Newark upon Trent and perhaps later called a Turk to help distinguish him from the Grey Arabian. His only stud book offspring was the Wallasey Stakes winner Mermaid (b f 1720). Mermaid produced two winners herself: Collier and John Trott. Collier (bl c 1738 Devonshire Blacklegs) won a 100gs match from Mr Greville's Oroonoko at Newmarket in 1745. John Trott (b c 1742 Devonshire Blacklegs) won a 1000gs match from the Duke of Ancaster's Pickpocket at Newmarket in 1746, beat the same horse for a 300gs sweepstakes at Newmarket in 1747 and the same year won the King's Plates at Winchester, Salisbury and Canterbury. Mermaid was also the 2nd dam of Sloe (bl c 1740 Crab) who was undefeated on the turf and a stallion at the Leedes stud in North Milford.
 
 
Swinburne's Arabian
[Taffilet] gr c 1752c. Thomas Swinburne (1705c-1772) was the third son of Sir William Swinburne, 2nd bt of Capheaton, Northumberland. He married Mary, daughter and coheiress of Anthony Meaburn of Pontop Hall, Tanfield, Durham. His Arabian was advertised to cover at Tanfield for a fee of 3 guineas. Described as a beautiful grey standing 14 hands 3 inches, perfectly sound and in excellent health, he was imported from Morocco by William Peticrew, the consul general to the Emperor of Morocco. He was said to be of the "L'Bedowey Breed" reputed to be the "highest blood". Taffilet sired the dam of Clockfast (gr c 1780 Bay Richmond) who found much success in America.
 
 
Taffolet Barb
[possibly Curwen's Bay Barb, Lowther Bay Barb] c 1685c. Sire Line Taffolet Barb. Taffolet Barb is also called "Taffolet (or Morocco Barb)" in the General Stud Book [GSB 1:389], giving rise to speculation that he was the same horse as the Fairfax Morocco Barb or some of the earlier Morocco Barbs kept at the royal stud at Tutbury. However, he had two offspring whose dates of birth are either known or have been estimated. Queen Anne's Mustard was born in 1707 and Honeycomb Punch ran in 1699, the latter leading C M Prior to estimate his year of birth at circa 1692. Thus, if the Taffolet Barb was imported he must have arrived prior to 1692. It seems probable that by the time of his purchase for stud he would have established a reputation, and so of necessity would have been at least five years old at that time. If his year of birth is estimated at circa 1685, he would then have sired Honeycomb Punch when seven years old, and Mustard when twenty-two years old, which seems a reasonable span for a stud career. Even if his date of birth is estimated at ten years earlier, he would have been born too late to be considered identical with the Fairfax Morocco Barb or the other known Morocco Barbs. Toru Shirai, in Family Tables of Racehorses, estimates the year of birth for Honeycomb Punch, son of the Taffolet Barb, at 1684, which would be improbable for a horse running in 1699, and it seems likely that this is a casual mistake made in assigning the date to the son rather than the sire. In the stud Taffolet Barb left several sons, notably Sir William Ramsden's Tantivy and Lord Godolphin's Honeycomb Punch, and some notable daughters. Sister to Honeycomb Punch was one of the foundation mares of Family 33, a small family which nevertheless produced the Derby winner Serjeant (b c 1781 Eclipse) and the good stallions Dungannon (b c 1780 Eclipse), Locust (b c c1744 Crab) and Sloe (bl c 1740 Crab). Taffolet Barb Mare, probably his best known offspring, was a foundation mare of Family 1, 2nd dam of Grey Ramsden (gr c 1704 Grey Hautboy), and 3rd dam of Bonny Lass (b f 1723 Bay Bolton), taproot mare of Family 1-a. Taffolet Barb Mare was also 5th dam of Old Snap (bl c 1750 Snip), three times a Champion Sire.
 
 
Tarran's Black Barb
bl c 1715c. Owned by the Reverend John Tarran, of Hornby, Yorkshire, he was the sire of three known offspring, Tarran (ch c 1724), Hornby Bore (c 1724c) and his sister (f 1725c). Sister to Hornby Bore also produced three known offspring, Top (b c 1731 Metcalfe's Harlequin), Menker (gr c 1735 Young Brisk) and Crazy (b c 1739 Childers). Tarran, raced by Mr Dashwood and Mr Shepherd, won the Ladies Plate at Epsom, King's Plates at Salisbury, Winchester, Canterbury and Newmarket, and the Gold Cup at Warwick, beating the likes of the Duke of Bolton's Foxhunter (br c 1724 Bay Bolton), Mr Humberstone's Stump (b c 1724 Manica) and Mr Coke's Hobgoblin (br c 1724 Aleppo). Crazy, bred by Thomas Bright and raced by Cuthbert Routh and George Prentice, won fifties at Stockton, Beverley, York, Leicester and Ludlow. He beat such horses as Mr Vavasour's Champion (b c 1739 Bolton Goliah) and Mr Martindale's Torismond (gr c 1739 Bolton Starling).
 
 
Tate's Arabian
c 1735c. Owned by William Tate, the Arabian was the sire of Lord Ferrers's Miss Tippet (b f 1742). Mr Tate owned several racehorses, most notable of whom was Greybeard (gr c 1754 Dormouse). Miss Tippet won a Fifty at Windsor in 1746, beating six others and finished 2nd for the Royal Plate for mares at Newmarket in 1747, won by the Duke of Ancaster's Hambleton Royal Plate winner Dizzy (gr f 1741 Driver).
 
 
The Caliph
c 1825c. An Arabian in Australia, he sired Fantail, one of the founding mares of Colonial Family C32, whose most famous member was the Melbourne Cup winner Toryboy (gr g 1857 Wollaton).
 
 

Thompson's Brown Arabian
[Achmed] br c 1765c. Owned by Mr Thompson and imported with Thompson's Grey Arabian he was described as particularly handsome in make and shape, and producing strong boney foals. He covered at the stud of Thomas Vincent at Osmanthorp, near Leeds, for a fee of 10gs, which was later reduced to 5gs. He sired Mr Atkinson's unnamed mare (b f 1772), who has no further record.
 
 
Thompson's Grey Arabian
[Cuhailan Assil] gr c 1765c. His blood and beauty was thought superior to most other horses and the 1500 guineas purchase price was said to have been judged less half his value by the Consul at Aleppo. He was "got by Mahnaghi, of the famous race of Bahill, and his dam was the curious Kehilana". He covered first at Osmanthorp for a fee of 10gs and later at Mr Dowson's Clay Hall, near Wanstead, in Essex, for 5gs. He sired two mares, one unnamed (b f 1772) bred by Mr Atkinson, and one named Mary (gr f 1772) bred by Lord Grosvenor. The first had no offspring; Mary had five offspring, all unnamed and with no further record.
 
 
Thornton Arabian 1720c
See Bloody Buttocks.
 
 
Thoulouse Barb
[Parsons' Barb, Burlington Barb] b c 1695c. Sire Line Thoulouse Barb. Said to be a gift from the King of Morocco to King Louis XIV (1638-1715) of France he was subsequently acquired by Henry Curwen (1661-1725) from the King's sons, the Counts of Byram and Thoulouse. He was purchased by Sir John Parsons (1639-1717), a noted brewer, of Reigate Priory in Surrey and Lord Mayor of London, and subsequently by Richard Boyle (1694-1753), 3rd Earl of Burlington. The Thoulouse Barb got many winners including the famous Molly (ch f 1713c) who was a mare of great celebrity, winning many matches before her death at Newmarket whilst running a match against the Duke of Bolton's Terror in 1723. The Barb was a champion sire in 1723. He also sired Tifter who in turn sired the Scarborough Colt (bl c 1724). The Scarborough Colt sired an unnamed mare who became the 4th dam of Clockfast (gr c 1780) and another unnamed mare who became the dam of Ancaster's Tarquin (b c 1745) who in turn sired Tarquin (b c 1854).
 
 
Tilney's Foreign Horse
c 1745c. This horse was possibly owned by Richard Child Tilney (1680-1750), Viscount Castlemain and 1st Earl Tilney, of Wanstead, Essex, and Tilney Hall, Hampshire. Lord Tilney represented Essex in parliament from 1710 to 1722 and from 1727 to 1734. Wanstead Hall was once considered one of the finest estates in England but was demolished early in the 19th century. The horse has only one known offspring, Mr Brookes unnamed mare (gr f 1753), a half sister to the famous Little Driver (ch c 1743 Beaver's Driver). However she does not appear to have raced or to have bred on.
 
 
Townshend's Barb
br c 1750c. Charles Townshend (1700-1764), 3rd Viscount Townshend and Baron Townshend de Lynn Regis, represented Great Yarmouth in parliament from 1721 to 1723, then took his seat in the house of Lords and an appointment as lord of the bedchamber to King George I. Later lord lieutenant of Norfolk and master of the jewel office he resigned these offices on the death of his father in 1738. His wife Audrey was the daughter of Edward Harrison, governor of Madras and later postmaster general. Lord Townshend established a small stud in the mid 1740s with mares purchased mainly from Lord Godolphin and Mr Crofts. The Barb got two known offspring, both unnamed colts, who do not appear to have had careers either on the turf or in the stud.
 
 
Trout's Arabian 1740c
 
 
Vane's Arabian 1730c
 
 
Vernon's Arabian
ch c 1765c. Sire of nearly forty offspring in the stud book from 1772 to 1780, most of them for his owner, the Honourable Richard Vernon (1726-1800) of Newmarket, but including Lord March's Khouli Khan (b c 1772) and Lord Derby's Fortunatas (br c 1789). Kouli Khan won a number of valuable matches at Newmarket. All of them except an unnamed mare (b f 1780), who was the dam of Mr Bullock's July Stakes winner Emigrant (b c 1794 Escape), failed to breed on past the first generation. The Arabian, "lately brought from Arabia" covered at Mr Vernon's stables at Newmarket in 1772 for a fee of 10gs. About ten years later he was advertised to cover at the Turf Tavern in London for a fee of 2gs. He covered the following year alongside Highflyer (b c 1774 King Herod) at Ely, in Cambridgeshire, for a fee of 5gs. Mr Vernon, who was married to a daughter of Lord Gower, was MP for Tavistock, Bedford, Okehampton and Newcastle under Lyme. He bred the first Derby winner Diomed (ch c 1777 Florizel) and was a prominent turf supporter in concert with his racing ally Lord March (later the Duke of Queensberry).
 
 
Vernon's Barb
c 1710c. Very little is known about this Barb other than that he was the sire of the fourth dam of Mr Pembroke's minor winner Aimwell (gr c 1750 Babraham). He seems to have been in the Royal Stud at Hampton Court and may have belonged to James Vernon (1646c-1727), a private secretary to James Scott, Duke of Monmouth and son of King Charles II.
 
 
Walpole Barb
[Orford Turk] gr c 1715c. The General Stud Book notes that he was called the "Orford or Walpole Grey Turk" [GSB 1:392]. Robert Walpole (1701-1751), 2nd Earl of Orford, was the eldest son of Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole and Lord Lieutenant of Devon from 1733 until his death. The Barb sired three known offspring, all mares. The Duke of Devonshire's unnamed mare (1720c) produced for his Grace an unnamed Childers Colt (ch c 1727) who was advertised in 1733 to cover for proprietor Robert Jackson of Hesslington, near York, for a fee of 2 guineas. The Duke of Ancaster's Miss Romp (b f 1736) produced a small family of runners which included Lord Abingdon's Grimalkin (ch c 1772 Eclipse), winner of a 100gs match and the Noblemen's and Gentlemen's Plate at Newmarket, and Gnat-Catcher (b f 1774 King Herod), winner of a Royal Plate at Lincoln and six fifties. The most significant of his get was probably the Duke of Devonshire's unnamed mare (1728c) of Family 6 who was grandam to the celebrated Little Driver (ch c 1743 Beaver's Driver) and ancestress of the Doncaster Cup winner Mercutio (b c 1819 Mowbray).
 
 
Ward's Arabian
c 1755c. Owned by John Ward, he covered at Squerries, near Westerham, Kent, for a fee of 5 guineas. He was the sire of Arabella (b f 1763) and her two sisters and one unnamed colt for his owner, all from a Sister to Flora (br f 1754 Tartar) bred by Sir William Middleton. However none of these is further recorded in the stud books or racing calendars.
 
 
Wastell's Turk
[Westall Turk] c 1695c. Wastell's "Salt-Fish" Turk was owned by John Wastell (1661-1737/38) from near Northallerton, Yorkshire, husband of Barbara Peirse, she a cousin of John Hutton II (1657-1731) who had established an extensive and successful stud at Marske. Wastell also had commercial and close geographical connections with Robert Byerley, owner of the Byerley Turk (bl c 1680c), and we speculate that, in the absence of any evidence for importation, Wastell's Turk could have been sired by the Byerley Turk. In the stud Wastell's Turk left six known offspring, one colt and five fillies. Of the latter, two made significant contributions to the stud book. (1) Mr Fletcher's unnamed colt (b c 1725) finished 2nd for a 5gs each subscription at Richmond [Baily 1:23]. Nothing further is known about this colt, however his year of birth indicates that Wastell's Turk probably lived to thirty years of age. (2) Croft's Pet Mare (gr f 1710c) is notable as the dam of the stallion Young Greyhound (gr c 1718 Greyhound), the second dam of the stallion Young Cartouch (ch c 1731 Cartouch), and the ancestress of the St Leger winner The Duchess (b f 1813 Cardinal York) and the Chester Cup winner King Cole (b c 1833 Memnon). (3) Another daughter, Darcy's Young Sorrill (the Duke appears to call her "Blackleggs" in a letter to James Darcy [Early Records:127]), was a broodmare in the Welbeck Abbey stud of John Holles (1662-1711), 4th Earl of Clare and Duke of Newcastle, and was probably a foundation mare of Family 7. Wastell's Turk also sired (4) the second dam of Mr Croft's Bustard (Greyhound) and (5) the third dam of the Somerset Diamond (ch c 1713c Jew Trump). Under the name of the Westall Turk (whom the General Stud Book says is "probably Wastell" Turk [GSB 1:385]) he got (6) the fifth dam of Sir John Shelley's Fantail (1770 Latham's Snap).
 
 
Wastell's Turk
c 1760c. John Wastell (1736-1811), grandson of the owner of Wastell's Turk, was born in Yorkshire and later bred and trained horses at Bury St Edmunds as well as managing the 3rd Duke of Grafton's racing stable. Wastell's Turk sired only one known offspring, Mr Wastell's unnamed chestnut colt of 1777. John Wastell also bred Alfred (b c 1770 Matchem), Conductor (ch c 1767 Matchem) and the Oaks winner Scotia (gr f 1799 Delpini).
 
 

Wellesley Grey Arabian
gr c 1796c. He was imported into England from India along with the Wellesley Chesnut Arabian. It is said both were chosen by English judges, "in that part of Arabia where the best horses are bred" and then imported by the Hon Henry Wellesley (1773-1847), 1st Baron Cowley and youngest brother of the Duke of Wellington, in August of 1803. Both were described as "evidently not Arabians," but the grey was "a horse of good shape, with the size and substance of an English hunter." Both were said to be "distinguished by size and power seldom found in any of their superior blood". The Grey Arabian, purchased from "near Bussorah", Persia, was said to be of the "Nedjudee breed" and the finest colt that had been bred in the that part of the desert for many years. They were both initially advertised to cover at Egham Wick, Surrey, for a fee of 5 guineas, except for winners or dams of winners of King's Plates &c, who would be covered for free. Later they covered at Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, and Russell's Farm, East Barnet, Herts, with the Grey Arabian commanding a fee of 8 guineas. The Grey Arabian moved to Virginia Water, near Egham, for the season of 1810. His daughter Fair Ellen (gr f 1806) was the dam of the Oaks winner Lilias (b f 1823 Interpreter), the Woodcote Stakes winner Translation (b f 1824 Interpreter) and the sixth dam of Frey (b f 1870 Dundee), the latter the dam of the Preakness Stakes winner Dunboyne (b c 1884 Uncas). The Wellesley Grey Arabian died in the winter of 1811-12.
 
 
Wellesley Chesnut Arabian
c 1799c. Imported into England along with the Wellesley Grey Arabian, he was said to be of "a breed which is held in great estimation in Arabia, for temper, spirit and activity" and to stand 15 hands 2 inches tall. He covered alongside the Grey Arabian at Egham Wick, Surrey, and Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, and later at Russell's Farm, East Barnet, for a fee of 5 guineas. For the 1810 season he moved to Eywood, near Kingston. He was the sire of one known unnamed colt (1805) from Florella (b f 1788 Justice), a mare bred by Lord Grosvenor.
 
 
Western Barb 1743
See Godolphin Brown Barb.
 
 
Wheatly Turk
c 1745c. He may have been in the stud of Charles Paulet (1685-1754), 3rd Duke of Bolton, however he does not appear in the General Stud Book. His only offspring was Bay Lusty (b c 1750c), bred by the Duke, who was described as a beautiful well marked bay, standing 15 hands and 1 inch, and allowed to be "the finest and most powerful, for so high bred a horse, in England". In 1760 Bay Lusty was advertised to cover at Mr Hinton's in Lee Lane, near Leisham, Kent, for just over a pound. He was thought to be very successful in getting foals, which were said to be both beautiful and strong.
 
 
White-Legged Lowther Barb
ch c 1685c
 
 
Whiteshirt 1665c
 
 
Widdrington Grey Arabian 1705c
See Bridgewater's Grey Arabian.
 
 
Wilkes's Barb
c 1690c. It is possible that this is the same horse as Hautboy (c 1685c Darcy's White Turk), or even that his name is a corruption of Wilkinson's Barb (c 1690c). The pedigree for Fanny (ch f 1751) reads: Fanny, by Tartar - Mare, by Starling - Mare, by Childers - Mare, by Grey Grantham - Lilliput's Dam, by Wilkinson's Barb - Milbanke's Bald Peg, by Burford Bull [GSB 1:84]. A pedigree for Archer (gr c 1746) reads: Archer, by Bolton Starling - Mare, by Bald Galloway - Mare, by Grey Grantham - Mare, by Wilkes's Barb - Milbanke's Bald Peg, by Burford Bull [Heber:1751]. The only known offspring of Wilkes's Barb is the mare that appears in the pedigree of Archer. Archer, who was first called Augustus, was owned by Mr Martindale and won King's Plates at Winchester and Salisbury. He was then purchased by Mr Arthur Marvin who took him to Ireland and ran him there with "indifferent success" [Pick 1:111]. In the stud Archer got Aimwell (gr c 1762) who won four Royal Plates in Ireland for his various owners. Archer also got an unnamed mare (1765) who became the dam of Cromaboo (gr c 1774 Gamahoe). Cromaboo was a stallion In Ireland, getting, among others, the King's Plate winner Percy (gr c 1788).
 
 
Wilkinson's Barb
c 1690c. Owned by Francis Wilkinson of West Layton, Yorkshire, he was the sire of two known offspring. (1) Silverlips (c 1715c), owned by Mr Lisle of Halzon, was said to have been the most celebrated plate horse ever known in those parts, winning £550 worth of plate besides a Gold Cup at Scotland "which no English horse but himself could do". His only loss occurred when he was "clap'd on the back sinews". He was advertised to cover at the Black Bull and Crown for a fee of half a guinea, at which time he was said to be "right sound and in fine order". (2) Wilkinson Barb Mare (1710c) produced Lilliput (ro c 1722 Bald Galloway) and his sister. Mr Fleetwood's Lilliput, sometimes described as a light chesnut, ran for Capt Milbanke, winning a plate at York. Running for Cuthbert Routh he won plates at Yarm and Bedale. Sister to Lilliput was the dam of Mr Leedes's Kettle Bender (ch c 1740 Smales's Childers), who was said to stand 14 hands and 1.5 inches tall, won a fifty at Carlisle in 1744. Wilkinson Barb Mare was also the 5th dam of Mr Tuting's Creeping Polly (ch f 1756 Othello), from whom all of Family 6-x+ descends.
 
 
Wilkinson's Bay Arabian
b c 1690c. Owned by Andrew Wilkinson of Boroughbridge, the Arabian may be the same horse as Wilkinson's Barb and Wilkinson's Turk. He sired an unnamed mare, from Lord Arlington's Natural Barb Mare, from whom all of Family 43 descends.
 
 
Wilkinson's Turk
c 1690c. The Turk may be the same horse as Wilkinson's Barb and Wilkinson's Bay Arabian. In the stud he got two unnamed mares, the first a foundation mare of Family 62, and the second a foundation mare of Family 71.
 
 
Williams's Arabian
[Wynn's Arabian] c 1720c. Sir Watkin Williams (1692-1749), 3rd bt of Llanforda, near Oswestry, Shropshire, succeeded to the Wynn estates at Gwydir, Caernarfonshire, in 1719, at which time he changed his name to Williams-Wynn. He represented Denbighshire in parliament for many years. Williams's Arabian had two known offspring under this name: (1) an unnamed mare (1728), bred by Mr Egerton from his Pigot Turk Mare, who drowned as a foal [GSB 1:156] and (2) the "famous Harlequin".
 
 
Williams's Turk 1700c
See Woodstock Arabian.
 
 
Willoughby Barb
c 1655c. One of the earliest known Barbs with offspring in the stud book, he was mated with the Bolton Castle Mare, taproot of Family 71, to produce an unnamed mare (1660c) who was the third dam of Bathurst's Look About You (gr c 1706c Rider's Cupid), as well as ancestress to the rest of the family. Look About You was well known in his day although little record is left of him. He may have been the same horse as Tregonwell Frampton's Look About You who was pledged to run matches at Newmarket in 1713 and 1715. The Willoughby Barb may also be the sire of the "Willobough Barb Mare" who was said to have been the third dam of Dyer's Dimple (c 1705c Leedes Arabian) and also of Mr Graham's Poppet (b c 1739 Ancaster Grasshopper).
 
 
Mosco Arabians
Wilson's Arabian 1735c, Wilson's Bay Arabian 1740c, Wilson's Chesnut Arabian 1745c
 
 
Winchilsea's Arabian
c 1790c. Owned by George Finch (1752-1826), 9th Earl of Winchilsea, the Arabian sired an unnamed mare for Lord Winchilsea in 1796. She had no offspring recorded in the stud book.
 
 
Witham Grey Arabian
gr c 1770c. He was the sire of only one offspring in the stud book, an unnamed mare foaled in 1776, she the property of Willoughby Bertie (1740-1799), 4th Earl of Abingdon. The mare herself has no recorded offspring. There is a possibility that the Witham Grey Arabian was the same horse as Burtlon's Arabian.
 
 
Woburn Arabian
ch c 1790c. Owned by Francis Russell (1765-1802), 5th Duke of Bedford, he was described as an "uncommonly handsome chesnut Arabian, brought from Bengal by Capt Grey, of the Rose Indiaman". The Woburn Arabian covered for a fee of 10gs and sired a half dozen or so foals, mostly for the Duke, between 1797 and 1799. None of these appear to have made any impact on the turf. The Duke achieved substantial success with Skyscraper (b c 1786 Highflyer), Eager (b c 1788 Florizel) and Fidget Colt (br c 1794 Fidget), all of whom won the Derby Stakes.
 
 
Wolseley Barb
bl c 1747c. The General Stud Book suggests that he was "probably the Black Barb which stood at Woolsey, Staffordshire [GSB 1:393]. He was advertised to cover "At Woolsey-Bridge, Staffordshire, A most beautiful BLACK BARB, full fifteen Hands high, free from any Blemish whatsoever, six Years old. He was a present from the Dey of Algiers, and brought over into this Kingdom 1751. He is allowed by all Judges who have seen him, to be as proper a Horse to get running Cattle, as ever came into England; and is one of the tallest, best-made and high-bred Horse, that ever came out of that Country. He covers this Season, at three Guineas a Mare, and half a Crown the Servant" [Pond 1753:163]. His fee later rose to five guineas. He may have been associated with Sir William Wolseley (-1779), 5th bt of Wolseley Hall, near Wolseley Bridge in Staffordshire. The Barb sired eight known offspring over a span of about fifteen years. Only two were winners: Sir R Grosvenor's Raphael (b c 1755) won a 500gs match from the Duke of Cumberland's colt at Newmarket in 1760 and in 1765 Lord Grosvenor's Fireaway (bl c 1761) won a 100gs match from Capt Shirley's Collier at Newmarket and a subscription at Euston. One of the Barb's daughters, Riddle (gr f 1762), owned by Lord Grosvenor, was the ancestress of July Stakes winners Merrymaker (b c 1814 Dick Andrews), Miracle (ch f 1816 Soothsayer), Spindle (b f 1808 Shuttle) and Cambric (b c 1807 Shuttle), as well as the Prix du Jockey Club winner Fitz Emilius (b c 1842 Young Emilius). One of his unnamed colts, bred by Sir William and described as a "fine, strong bay horse, full 15 hands and a half," was advertised to cover at the same place in 1760.
 
 
Woodstock Arabian
[Williams's Turk] gr c 1700c. According to the General Stud Book the Woodstock Arabian may be the same horse as Williams's White Turk [GSB 1:18]. It is also possible that he is the same horse as Honeywood's Arabian. He sired Flying Whigg (f 1715) who became the dam of Sachrissa [Large Hartley Mare] (ch f 1729) and Amorett [Little Hartley Mare] (ch f 1727), both early matriarchs of Bruce Lowe's Family 15 and an enormous influence on early American pedigrees. Amorett was the dam of (1) Blank (b c 1740 Godolphin Arabian) who sired Centinel (ch c 1758) and Fallower*(c 1759); (2) Old England (b c 1741 Godolphin Arabian) who sired Northumberland (gr c 1761); and (3) Janus (b c 1738 Godolphin Arabian) the sire of Janus (ch c 1746). Sachrissa was the dam of (1) Roger's Babraham (b c 1738 Godolphin Arabian) who sired Juniper (b c 1752), Young Babraham (b c 1760), Genius (b c 1753), Hob-or-Nob (b c 1751) and Shadow (b c 1759); and (2) Mogul (b c 1735) who sired Jolly Roger (ch c 1743).
 
 
Wynn's Arabian
gr c 1715c. Sire Line Wynn's Arabian. He was probably the same horse as W Williams's Arabian and Lonsdale's Grey Arabian. He may have been associated with the Ancaster stud through connections established by the marriage in 1678 of Mary Wynn to Robert Bertie (1660-1723), 4th Earl of Lindsey, who was created Duke of Ancaster in 1715. He got nearly twenty foals in the Ancaster stud from 1721 to 1735c. Among his better known offspring are (1) Ancaster's Driver gr c 1727), (2) Crab (gr c 1726) and (3) Wynn Arabian mare (f 1735c) the third dam of Delpini (gr c 1781 Highflyer) and the fourth dam of the Derby winner Archduke (br c 1796 Sir Peter Teazle), the Doncaster Cup winner (twice) Stamford (br c 1794 Sir Peter Teazle) and the Derby winner Paris (br c 1803 Sir Peter Teazle).
 
 
Wyvill's Golden Arabian 1710c
 
 
 
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