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Hampton Court Orientals
   

Hampton Court












King William III
(1650-1702)


Queen Anne
(1665-1714)


King George I
(1660-1727)










Hampton Court Arabian



Courtesy of Richard Green Gallery
Lord Halifax's Bumper





Hampton Court, the favourite residence of King Henry VIII, was briefly occupied Oliver Cromwell and then languished somewhat until King William and Queen Mary began the restoration of the palace in 1689 and the refurbishment of the royal paddocks in 1699 [History of Newmarket 3:361]. Bushy (or Bushey) Park was probably also used for bloodstock breeding by the Earls of Halifax. Charles Montague (1661-1715), 1st Earl of Halifax, commenced the repair of Bushy House in 1708 which was continued by his nephew George Montague Dunk, the 1st Earl of Halifax (second creation), who died in 1739. The latter is the breeder of record of a number of offspring that were sired by stallions either owned by King George I or who appeared to reside at Hampton Court. Bloodstock breeding continued there until Queen Victoria's final bloodstock sale in 1894.

Since King William III (1650-1702) sent his stud master Richard Marshall to acquire horses from Barbary in 1699 Hampton Court has been home to a great many Arabians, Barbs, Turks and Persians. The identity of the nine stallions and five mares who were imported at that time is not definitively known although King William's White Barb Chillaby, his Black Barb without-a-tongue, John Hutton's Grey Barb and the Hampton Court Brown Barb are thought to be among them. Some of these doubtlessly remained at Hampton Court during the reign of Queen Anne (1702-14) and possibly as late as the reign of King George I (1714-1727). Richard Marshall (1659-1728) served as stud master to all three monarchs.
 
Chillaby
 
Chillaby
[King William's White Barb] gr c 1695c. Sire Line Chillaby. One of a great many stallions who covered at Hampton Court, he sired five stud book offspring. Of these, two were stallions. Greyhound (gr c 1700c) a son of the "Natural Barb Mare" Slugey and imported in utero was the most influential as he left a large number of offspring, many of whom were instrumental in the establishment of the racehorse. Chillaby's other son, the Hampton Court Cripple Barb (b c 1705c), was less so although his daughter Lusty Thornton (ch f 1710c) was among the foundation mares of Family 2. The first of his daughters, Sister to Cripple Barb (f 1704c) was the grandam of the York Royal Plate winner Merryman (b g 174), the Hambleton Royal Plate winner, Mr Witty's Conyers Arabian Mare (gr f 1716 Conyers Arabian), and her brother Conyers Arabian Colt (c 1720c) who got the stallion Hodges Centurion (c 1725c). The next of his daughters, Halifax's Farmer Mare (f 1705c) was probably the most influential as most of Family 27 traces to her. His third daughter, Chillaby Mare (f 1706c), was the dam of the stallion Gallant's Smiling Tom (gr c 1710c Conyers Arabian). There is some circumstantial evidence that Chillaby was also the horse known as Honeywood's Arabian.



Greyhound (GB)
[Marshall's] gr c 1700c (King William's Chillaby Barb - Slugey). Sire Line Chillaby. Family 101. Greyhound, a "natural barb," was foaled at Hampton Court. Later purchased by William Crofts of Barforth he was a "common stallion" in Yorkshire although he covered some well bred mares. He sired nearly seventy known offspring including several good racehorses. His best runners were probably Lord Halifax's Goliah (gr c 1722) who won a 200 guineas match at Newmarket, the Gold Cup at Winchester and the King's Plate at Lewes and Lord Halifax's Sampson (gr c 1721) who won a 200 guineas match at Newmarket and King's Plates at Guildford, Lewes, Newmarket (twice) and Lincoln. His most significant sons were likely the two Young Greyhounds. Young Greyhound (gr c 1718) was said to have gotten few mares although he should probably be credited with some offspring usually assigned to the other Young Greyhound (br c 1723) sire of Miss Makeless (b f 1737) the ancestress of most of Family 2. Greyhound also sired several influential daughters including Sister to Guy (f 1722), the ancestress of most of Family 4, Sister to Sampson (ch f 1723) the ancestress of most of Family 12 and Brocklesby (gr f 1721) the ancestress of most of Family 23
.



Cripple Barb (GB)
[Hampton Court Cripple Barb, Crofts Bay Barb] b c 1705c (Chillaby - Moonah Barb Mare, by Hampton Court Brown Barb). Sire Line Chillaby. Family 21. Bred in the Hampton Court stud of Queen Anne he was later given to Mr Crofts. The General Stud Book notes that "he got some horses that could run a little, but was a bad stallion" [Intro, Part 4]. He sired eight known offspring. Neither of his two colts bred on. His daughters faired slightly better with Mr Elstob's Cripple Barb Mare (f 1710c) of Family 4 the dam of the good stallion Cartouch (c 1717c Bald Galloway) and her sister the dam of Hodge's Centurion (c 1725c Conyers Arabian Colt). Lusty Thornton (ch f 1710c) was a foundation mare of Family 2
.
 
Conyers Arabian
 
[Richards Arabian, Stanyans Arabian] gr c 1700c. He was probably owned by Thomas Conyers (d 1728), MP for Durham from 1698 to 1701 and 1702 to 1706, as well as equerry to Prince George of Denmark from 1704 to 1706. Abraham Stanyan (1669c-1732) was ambassador to Constantinople from 1717 to 1730. Conyers Arabian covered at Hampton Court in the reign of King George I. He has ten known offspring, the most famous of these probably Gallant's Smiling Tom (gr c 1710c), a successful stallion in his own right. Other notable offspring include (1) Grey Whiteneck (gr f 1715c) of Family 9 the ancestress of such horses as Aristotle* (br c 1755 Cullen Arabian) and Pacolet (gr c 1763 Blank), (2) the dam of Diana (br f 1740 Godolphin's Whitefoot) and Charming Molly (br f 1742 Godolphin Whitefoot) between them ancestresses of much of Family 13, (3) the dam of Bridgewater's Star (c 1725 Ashridge Ball), (4) the grandam of the winner Chedworth's Moses (ch c 1746 Howe's Foxhunter), (5) the great grandam of the winner Aimwell (gr c 1750 Babraham) and (6) the Conyers Arabian Colt, sire of Hodge's Centurion (c 1725c).



Conyers' Arabian Colt (GB)
c 1720c (Conyers Arabian Colt - Mare, by Cripple Barb). Sire Line Conyers' Arabian. Family 21. He sired Hodge's Centurion (c 1725c).
 
Cyprus Arabian
 

c 1710c. Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. The Cyprus Arabian was owned by John Manners (1676-1721), 2nd Duke of Rutland, who succeeded to that title on the death of his father, the 1st Duke, in 1711. The Manners family had for generations bred race horses and were noted for their "Belvoir Castle running strains" [Robertson:32]. An earlier Earl of Rutland had recorded a desire to acquire a Barb from Italy in 1609, about the same time that Lord Cranbourne purchased one in Marseilles [Early Records:79] and it seems conceivable that their foundation stock was established by crossing imported eastern horses with native British mares. Around the turn of the eighteenth century the Belvoir Castle stud in Leicestershire, near Grantham, Lincolnshire, was noted for such runners as the famous race mare Bonny Black and Coneyskins and the stallion Grey Grantham. The two sons of the 2nd Duke, John Manners (1696-1779) who became the 3rd Duke, and his brother Lord William Manners (1697-1772), were also supporters of the turf and both are recorded as breeders or owners of offspring of the Cyprus Arabian.

According to the General Stud Book the Duke of Rutland's Cyprus Arabian was probably the same horse as the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian and foaled about 1720 [GSB 1:391], and according to the Sporting Kalendar he was probably also called simply Cyprus, as in the pedigree of Amelia: "her Great Grandam by Cyprus, out of the Duke of Rutland's famous Bonny Black" [Pond 1755:164].

However, since both the Cyprus Arabian and the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian are mentioned in John Cheny's Racing Calendars during the late 1720s and early 1730s presumably he would have made note of it had they been the same horse. That they were the same horse seems unlikely as both horses, one covering in Leicestershire and one covering in Surrey, have offspring attributed to them during approximately the same time span with some offspring of each having identical years of birth. The General Stud Book does not suggest that they were the same horse until the fifth edition of the first volume in 1891, nearly two hundred years later, and does not explain its reason for doing so. However, he may be the same horse as the Hampton Court Litton Arabian.

Racing records prior to 1720 are not only scarce and fragmentary but mention of an Arabian contesting a match is extremely rare. However, J B Muir records that the Duke of Rutland's Arabian was engaged to run against Mr Noel's mare in April of 1717 and against Mr Frampton's Potatoe in October of 1717. The following year he makes notes of a scheduled match between the Duke of Rutland's Cyprus and Mr Frampton's Spider [Ye Olde New-Markitt Calendar:46,48,51]. Although no race results are forthcoming it seems likely that, according to the customs of the times, the Arabian was given his name after proving his merit on the turf.

In the stud he left a number of sons, some apparently successful runners, although most of them did not leave any notable offspring. Two of them appear in the inventory of the Duke of Devonshire's stud, foals of 1724 and 1726, both of whom were gelded [Royal Studs:124]. It is to his daughters that he owes his legacy.

Notable Cyprus Arabian Mares
1. Cyprus Arabian Mare, (br f 1720), bred by the Duke of Devonshire, dam of Lord Lonsdale's Kouli Khan (b c 1730 Lonsdale Bay Arabian), and 5th dam of Miss Muston (b f 1790 King Fergus) of Family 9-a.
2. Cyprus Arabian Mare, (f 1720c), bred by the Duke of Rutland, foundation mare of Family 39, and 4th dam of Turk (b c 1763 Regulus). She was also the dam of Tawney (br c 1743 Crab) who, after winning Fifties at Odsey, Huntingdon, Oxford, Lambourn, Burford, Epsom, Newton and Lichfield, was acquired by Lord March and employed as the near-side leader for his chaise in the famous Queensberry Carriage Match.
3. Cyprus Arabian Mare, (f 1720c), dam of Sir Edmund Bacon's Royal Plate winner Spanking Roger (ch c 1732 Childers).
4. Cyprus Arabian Mare, (f 1720c), 2nd dam of William Wildman's Granby (b c 1759 Blank) who numbered Fifties at Epsom, Guildford, Maidenhead and Barnet, and King's Plates at Guildford and Salisbury among his victories on the turf.

The following sons of the Cyprus Arabian are listed here with as much of their history as can be found. Note that their race records and pedigrees are necessarily incomplete.

Doctor (GB)
ch c 1720c (Cyprus Arabian - Mare, by Crofts Commoner). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Family 2. Bred by Mr Vernon and owned successively by Lord William Manners, Mr Panton and Mr Garthside he was apparently well regarded as his name is generally mentioned among the notable offspring of the Cyprus Arabian. He doesn't appear to have raced with much success, however he collected a forfeit from Sir William Morgan's Tarquin at Newmarket in 1725. In 1728 he covered at Warren Lodge, Grimsthorpe Park, for a fee of half a guinea. In the stud he got the winners Sobersides and Fearnought.


Sobersides (GB)
ch c 1729 (Doctor - Mare, by Oysterfoot). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Owned by the Hon Mr Bertie, he was defeated only once during his turf career. In August of 1734 he won the Ladies' Plate at York in his only start of the year. In 1735 he won Royal Plates at Guildford, Salisbury and Canterbury, and walked-over for Royal Plates at Lincoln and Newmarket. In 1736 he lost the Royal Plate at Newmarket to Captain Hartley's Whitefoot. He was described as a strong dark chesnut standing nearly 15 hands and able to carry 16st hunting. He covered at Cotesmore for a fee of 1 guinea.


Fearnought (GB)
[Misfortune] ch c 1731c (Doctor - Mare, by Oysterfoot). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. First called Misfortune he was owned by Mr Garthside and a brother to Sobersides. In 1738 he won a fifty at Norwich and 30gs at Rugby. He was said to stand 15 hands and be able to carry 18st. He was described as "without dispute ... as fine a horse as ever was bred in England, both for shape and action". He covered in Lincolnshire at Rigsby, near Alford in 1747 for a fee of 1 guinea. In the stud he got Mr Garthside's Pamela.

Pamela (GB)
ch f 1740 (Fearnought - Mare, by Manica). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Bred by Mr Garthside, she was later owned by Mr Musters. In 1745 she won the King's Plate at Hambleton beating Mr Langley's Gipsey (bl f 1740 Devonshire Blacklegs) and Mr Metcalfe's Lady Betty (b f 1740 Devonshire Blacklegs) along with seven others. In 1746 she finished second to Mr Blink's Labour In Vain for a £50 Plate at Doncaster.


Last-Time-Of-Asking (GB)
c.1722 (Cyprus Arabian). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian
. Owned by Lord Gower he was defeated in the Royal Plate at Nottingham in 1728 by Mr Alcock's Spot (b c 1722 Alcock's Arabian).


Pantaloon (GB)
b c 1724 (Cyprus Arabian). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Bred by the Duke of Rutland and raced by Lord William Manners, he started for the Royal Plate at Guildford in 1730, won by the Duke of Bolton's Foxhunter, followed by Mr Culpin's Bloody Buttocks. Mr Henley's Cramp went lame and was withdrawn. Pantaloon, beset by a broken stirrup ran off the course, threw his rider, and was subsequently deemed distanced [Cheny 1730:9 & Pick 1: 465]. The same year he ran 3rd for Lord Onslow in the Salisbury Royal Plate.


Ringtail (GB)
c 1720c (Cyprus Arabian). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Owned by the Duke of Rutland, Ringtail lost a race in October of 1724 to the Duke of Bolton's Bay Bolton (possibly a relation of the earlier Bay Bolton).


Roger (GB)
ch c 1724 (Cyprus Arabian). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. Bred by the Duke of Rutland and owned by Lord William Manners, he won a 300 guineas match at Newmarket against the Duke of Bridgewater's colt in April of 1729 [Cheny 1729:4]. He also finished 3rd for the Royal Plate at Ipswich in 1729, won by Sir Robert Fagg's Golden Locks (ch c 1724 Alcock's Arabian), followed by Mr Humberston's Stump (b c 1724 Manica), beating six others [Pick 1:465].


Spot (GB)
[Panton's] ch c 1720c (Cyprus Arabian). Sire Line Cyprus Arabian. In October of 1725 Mr Panton's Spot lost a 500 guineas match over four miles against the Duke of Bolton's Bay Bolton (possibly a relation of the famous Bay Bolton) at Newmarket [Baily 1:11]. Spot also started for a Fifty at Guildford in 1727 where he was distanced in the third heat [Cheny 1727:13]. We speculate that he could have been the same horse as the Duke of Rutland's Spot
.

 
Hampton Court Black Arabian
 
bl c 1740c. From the Hampton Court stud of King George II (1683-1760) the Arabian's only known offspring was a colt bred by Francis Godolphin (1678-1766), 2nd Earl of Godolphin, and foaled at Gog Magog in 1751. He was described as a black colt with a star, "& ye outside of ye near fore foot white, & a little of ye inside of ye near Hind foot white, & ye off Hind foot white, Half way up his Legg" [Royal Studs:157]. The colt was sold to Mr Panton in 1752 however he made no subsequent mark on the turf or in the stud book.
 
Hampton Court Brown Barb
 
br c 1690c. He may have been one of the nine Barbary horses and five mares imported by Richard Marshall in 1699 while he was stud master to King William III. The evidence is scant and contradictory:

Rib was got by Old Crab. His dam by Ld Darcy's Woodcock, his grand dam by a Barb in that country, and she called the Moonah Mare, was brought over in the same mannr as The Royal Affrican, her brother, and were foaled with the King's stud at Hampton Court, This pedigree was sent by Mr Marshall, Studmaster at Hampton Court. To Sr Ralph Milbanke, Bart, at Halnaby. (Witness) Cuthbert Routh [ER:70].

The famous Grey Horse called Rib ... got by Mr Panton's Old Crab, his Dam was the noted Mare call'd Doll, she was got by Darcy's Woodcock, his Grandam by a True Barb, and called the Moonah-Mare, being brought over in the same Manner as the Royal African her Brother, and both foaled at Hampton Court [York Courant, Tuesday, March 6, 1749-50].

Comet, the Duke of Bridgewater's, was got by Cade; his Dam by Young Greyhound, his Grandam by Woodstock, which Mare was the Dam of Rib, and out of the own Sister to the Royal African, which was got by the brown Barb at Hampton Court, and out of the Moonah Mare [Pond:1757].

Premium ... was got by Omnium, out of a daughter of Syphon, grand dam by Norris's Bolton, g. grand dam by Old Cade, g. g. grand dam by Young Greyhound, g. g. g. grand dam by Lord Darcy's Woodcock, g. g. g. g. grandam by the Royal African, out of the Moonah Barb mare [Weatherbys 1778:337].

Queen Anne's well-known Moonah Barb Mare, who was got "by a Barb in that country," and "brought over in the same mannr as The Royal African" (i.e., in utero) to Hampton Court, as attested by Mr. Marshall, the King's (William III.) studmaster" [Royal Studs:76].

One interpretation is that two barb mares were imported with the Hampton Court Brown Barb, both already in foal to him, one of them would produce Queen Anne's Moonah Barb Mare and the other would produce the Royal African. The foals may have been referred to as siblings since they had the same sire.

The Hampton Court Brown Barb sired Queen Anne's Moonah Barb Mare (b f 1700c), the taproot mare of Family 21, after which he is not mentioned again. It is possible that he changed hands and was then known by another name. He may even be the horse mentioned in a 1706 entry in Lord Bristol's diary, describing a horse he had purchased at the North Milford stud of Mr Leedes, "a 2 year old bay colt gott by ye Barbe King William gave his father," and perhaps in a 1709 letter written by Charles Wilkinson (father of Andrew Wilkinson of Boroughbridge who bred Sedbury (ch c 1734 Crofts Partner)and others) to the Duke of Newcastle, noting the sire of a mare as "the horse Sir William Ramsdall and Mr Leedes has betwixt them called the King's Barbe".
 
Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian
 

ch c 1710c. According to the General Stud Book the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian was probably the same horse as the Duke of Rutland's Cyprus Arabian and foaled about 1720 [GSB 1:391]. It is possible that he was the same horse as the Hampton Court Litton Arabian. His year of birth should probably be estimated somewhat earlier as he is credited with several offspring that contradict this, notably Mr. Strickland's Tarquin, foaled in 1720, and Sister to Tarquin, foaled in 1721 [GSB 1:115].

Since both the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian and the Cyprus Arabian are mentioned in Mr Cheny's racing calendars during the late 1720s and early 1730s presumably he would have noticed that they were the same horse. That they were the same horse seems unlikely as both horses, one covering in Surrey and one covering in Leicestershire, have offspring attributed to them during approximately the same time span with some offspring of each having identical years of birth. The General Stud Book does not suggest that they were the same horse until the fifth edition of the first volume in 1891, nearly two hundred years later.

According to Lady Wentworth an Arabian belonging to King George I was named Horn and lived from 1720 to 1740 [Thoroughbred Racing Stock:261]. She has also identified a number of other horses by name, including the dam of the two True Blues (Treasure), Darcy's White Turk (Snowball), Darcy's Yellow Turk (Orange), the Layton Grey Barb (Ferris) and Wyvill's Roan Mare (Dusty Polly). It should be noted that she does not mention her source for this information nor can any of these names can be confirmed by the standard authorities. Although she does not state that King George's Horn and the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian were the same horse she presents a portrait of a chestnut stallion with similar markings, including a fairly distinctive dot of white above the near nostril, to a portrait by Wooton which is said to be of a chestnut Arabian from Aleppo and, lacking evidence to the contrary, may have been the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian.

In the stud the Chesnut Arabian he got several sons that had some success as runners, notably Bravo, Red Rose and Tarquin, although none of them appears to have bred on. The General Stud Book credits him with being the sire of Chiddy (b f 1733) in its final edition of volume 1 in 1891 [GSB 1:30], however, all other sources, including earlier volumes of the General Stud Book, record that Chiddy was sired by the Hampton Court Childers. In any case the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian made his contribution to bloodstock breeding through his good daughters.

Notable Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian Mares
1. Sister to Red Rose (f 1726c), owned by the Duke of Somerset, dam of Young Cartouch (ch c 1731 Cartouch). Young Cartouch sired the 2nd dam of Trentham (b c 1766 Gower's Sweepstakes).
2. Lady Cow (ch f 1725), owned by Mr Naper, dam of Marksman (b c 1741 Godolphin Arabian) and his sisters.
3. Sister to Tarquin, (b f 1721), owned by Mr Lockyer, 2nd dam of Bosphorus (br c 1754 Babraham).
4. Hampton Court Arabian Mare, (f 1725c), 2nd dam of Whistlejacket (ch c 1749 Mogul) winner of the Edinburgh Royal Plate in 1754 and the York Royal Plate in 1755.
5. Hampton Court Arabian Mare, (f 1725c), 3rd dam of Queen Mab* (gr f 1745) and 4th dam of Moore's Britannia* (b f 1750 Hampton Court Dun Barb) both of Family 101 which was esteemed in colonial America.

Bravo (GB)
ch c 1723 (Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian).
Owned by Sir Nathaniel Curzon he won a 30 Plate at Chester, beating Mr Jones's Who'd Have Thought It, Mr Williams's Sloven, Mr Purlestone's Surly and Sir R Grosvenor's Terror. In May of 1728 he lost a Sweepstakes at Wallasey to the Duke of Ancaster's Gentleman (gr c 1723 Alcock's Arabian).


Red Rose (GB)
ch c 1725c (Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian - Croft's Pet Mare, by Wastell's Turk). Family 4. Probably foaled at Hampton Court he was later owned by the Duke of Somerset. As shown in the General Stud Book the Duke of Somerset's Red Rose and his sister were from Croft's Pet Mare. However, according to 18th century stallion advertisements, their dam was instead a mare called Smug, she by Slug and out of "a Mare of Mr Frampton`s Bull-kind".


Tarquin (GB)
c 1720 (Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian - Mare, by Leedes). Family 21. Bred at Hampton Court he was later the property of Sir William Morgan. In 1725 he paid forfeit to Mr Panton's Doctor at Newmarket.

 
Hampton Court Dun Barb
 
c 1740c. He may have been the same horse as Gower's Dun Barb. He covered at Hampton Court in the reign of King George II (1683-1760) who ascended the throne in 1727. His only known offspring was Moore's Britannia (b f 1750) who appears in Family 101 which was highly esteemed in colonial America.
 
Hampton Court Grey Arabian
 
[King's Grey Arabian, His Majesty's one-eyed Arabian, Foreign Horse at Hampton Court] gr c 1720c. The General Stud Book notes that he was also referred to as "His Majesty`s one-eyed Grey Arabian (at Hampton Court)" [GSB 1:109] and a "foreign horse at Hampton Court, in entries called the King`s Grey Arabian" [GSB 1:9]. The Arabian first covered in the stud of King George I (1660-1727), who ascended the throne in 1714, although he may have moved north later on. He has five known offspring of whom three were winners. Bay Robin (b c 1727), owned by Lord Halifax, won a 200gs match at Newmarket in 1732 defeating Lord Godolphin's Shanks. Shepherdess (gr f 1734) won the Royal Plate at Hambleton in 1739 and was later in Lord Antrim's stud in Ireland. Mr Rich's Caristina (b g 1729) won the Royal Plate at Nottingham in 1735 beating Mr Tuting's Rosinante (b c 1729 Matthews Persian) and Lord Portmore's Croke (ch c 1729 Skipjack) along with two others.
 
Hampton Court Grey Barb
 
gr c 1730c. He was the sire of Mr Metcalf's grey filly who ran for a 20gs prize for four year olds at Black Hambleton in August of 1738, finishing fifth of seven.
 
Hampton Court Litton Arabian
 
ch c 1710c. Although he was in the stud at Hampton Court he appears to have been exclusively utilised by the Lords Halifax. In an advertisement for Russet he was referred to as the Hampton Court Little Arabian, "Justice was out of Aldby Jenny, and the Hampton Court Little Arabian" [Cheny 1745:121]. It is possible that he was the same horse as the Hampton Court Chesnut Arabian.

Notable Hampton Court Litton Arabian Mares
1. Bushy Molly (ch f 1717), bred by Lord Halifax, failed to win on the turf, however, she became one of the foundation mares of Family 27 and the 3rd dam of the good winner Antelope (bu c 1760 Brilliant).
2. Miss Halifax (ch f 1724), bred by Lord Halifax, had some success on the turf, finishing 2nd for a 20gs each sweepstakes won by Mr Coke's Hobgoblin (br c 1724 Aleppo), and finishing 3rd for the Royal Plate won by Mr Egerton's Nancy, both races at Newmarket. She produced the winner Punch (b c 1734 Hampton Court Childers).



Justice (GB)
b c 1725 (Hampton Court Litton Arabian - Aldby Jenny, by Manica). Sire Line Hampton Court Litton Arabian. Family 72. This pedigree differs from the one offered in the General Stud Book which says that Aldby Jenny was by "Leedes Dragon, out of Sir Matthew Pierson's Ruby" [GSB 1:2], however other evidence supports Manica as her sire, "Manica also got Aldby Jenny" [Cheny 1743:xxii] and in an advertisement for Plunder "... full sister to Aldby Jenny, got by Manica" [York Courant, Tuesday, April 15, 1740]. It should also be noted that Justice may reasonably have been expected to be a foal from Lord Halifax's Farmer Mare whose produce record is blank for his year of birth. A further conflict arises from an advertisement for Justice while he was at stud in Ireland which says his dam was neither of the foregoing and rather "is true son to the Cypress Arabian at Hampton-Court, and out of a full sister to True Blue, which was got by Major Honeywood's Turk" [Dublin Journal, April 23-26, 1737]. The latter is the only pedigree of him published during his lifetime. Bred by Lord Halifax, he ran from 1730 to 1732, winning a 200gs match from Lord Portmore's Daffodil (ch 1725 Bald Galloway) and a 100gs match from Lord Howe's Miss Hoyden, both at Newmarket. In the stud he got Miss Patch (b f 1737) the 4th dam of the Irish stallion Bob Booty (ch c 1804 Chanticleer) and an unnamed mare who produced the York Royal Plate winner Atlas (b c 1752 Babraham).



Bumper (GB)
b c 1718 (Hampton Court Litton Arabian - Farmer Mare, by Chillaby). Sire Line Hampton Court Litton Arabian. Family 27. Bred by Lord Halifax he ran from 1723 to 1726, winning a 200gs match from the Duke of Bolton's Badger and a 200gs match from Lord Tankerville's Bay Wilkinson (b c 1717 Lister's Snake). He sired his namesake, Bumper (ch c 1728) who won a match at Newmarket in 1733 for the Earl of Halifax.


 
Red Robin (GB)
b c 1720 (Hampton Court Litton Arbaian - Farmer Mare, by Chillaby). Sire Line Hampton Court Litton Arabian. Family 27. Bred by Lord Halifax he was a full brother to Bumper. Less successful on the turf he collected a forfeit from Lord Godolphin's Goslin at Newmarket. He covered for the 1726 season at Kenton, near Newcastle upon Tyne, in the hands of Robert Todd, for a fee of 2 guineas.

 
Hutton's Grey Barb
 
gr c 1695c. See Hutton's Grey Barb.
 
King George's Persian
 
c 1765c. Owned by George William Frederick (1738-1820), King George III, the horse was the sire of only one known offspring, Lord Pomfret's unnamed colt (1769) from a Marksman Mare. The colt is not further noticed in the calendars or stud books.
 
King William's Black Barb
 
[No-tongued Barb] bl c 1695c. This horse is also likely to have been one of the nine stallions and five mares imported from Barbary by Richard Marshall during his tenure as stud master to King William III. In the stud he sired an unnamed mare (f 1710c), the 5th dam of Meteor (ch c 1783 Eclipse), and Gipsy (bl f 1720c), from whom a fair amount of Family 13 descends.
 
Roan Barb
 
c 1725c. One of the many oriental residents at Hampton Court, his time there appears to have been during the reigns of King George I and King George II. His known offspring number less than half a dozen and none of them seem to have had much impact on the stud book in England. His son Highlander (gr c 1735c) ran for a King's Plate in Ireland and was later a stallion there. Another son, an unnamed colt (ch c 1731) from Lord Halifax's Farmer Mare, ran for Lord Halifax at Newmarket in 1735 and 1736 but failed to win. George Montague Dunk (1684c-1739), the 1st Earl of Halifax (of the 2nd creation), bred and raced a number of horses from stallions at Hampton Court.
 
Slit Ear'd Barb
 
c 1730c. Yet another nearly anonymous resident of Hampton Court, he sired only one known daughter, from a daughter of the Roan Barb, who appears in the pedigree of a Cade Mare from a list of horses to be auctioned in 1757 [Pond:1757].
 
South Barb
 
c 1735c. His only known daughter, from a Sister to Monkey, produced Mr Tate's Greybeard, (gr c 1754 Dormouse) who achieved some success on the turf, winning Fifties at Aylesbury, Swaffam, Epsom, Canterbury and Odiham as well as the Ladies Purse at Oxford.
 
 

   
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