Home    Contact Us   FAQ    Links    Race Results    Archives
Family Numbers    Sire Lines    Breeders    As It Were    Genealogy
A   B   C   D   EF   G   H   IJK   L   M   NO   P   QR   S   T   UV   W   XYZ

 
Lord Clifden (GB)
 
 


Lord Clifden



Sire Line


Camel





Lord Clifden (1860)
     Hampton (1872)
     .     Ayrshire (1885)
     .     Bay Ronald (1893)
     .          Dark Ronald (1905)
     .          .     Son-In-Law (1911)
     .          Bayardo (1906)
     .               Gay Crusader (1914)
     .               Gainsborough (1915)
     .                    Solario (1922)
     .                    Hyperion (1930)
     Petrarch (1873)

Lord Clifden b c 1820 (Newminster - The Slave, by Melbourne). Sire Line Camel. Family 2-h.

Bred by J A Hind and owned by Carnegie Robert John Jervis (1825–1879), 3rd Viscount St Vincent, from a mare bred by HM Queen Victoria at Hampton Court, he was a half brother to the Stewards Cup and Portland Handicap winner Lady Clifden (b f 1858 Surplice).
Lord Clifden Newminster Touchstone Camel
Banter
Beeswing Doctor Syntax
Ardrossan Mare
The Slave Melbourne Humphrey Clinker
Cervantes Mare
Volley Voltaire
Martha Lynn
He was described as "Melbourne all over, only toned down" and was said to be a big horse standing on upright forelegs with a great length of haunch and shoulder making him a powerful galloper. He was thought to be somewhat poorly coupled giving rise to his difficulty in getting up and down hill and his dislike for Ascot.

In 1862 he won the Woodcote Stakes at Epsom, beating Lord St Vincent's The Orphan (br f 1862 Frogmore). He was promptly purchased by Captain Christie for £4000 and quickly sold to Lord St Vincent for 5000gs. He then won the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, deafeating Lord Stamford's Armagnac (ch c 1860 Faugh-A-Ballagh) and a sweep beating E Wilson's Bohemia (b f Weatherbit) and Lord Falmouth's Queen Bertha (b f 1860 Kingston).

In 1863 he lost the Derby by a head to the Two Thousand Guineas winner Macaroni (b c 1860 Sweetmeat), beating Lord Glasgow's Rapid Rhone (gr c 1860 Young Melbourne) and H Savile's The Ranger (br c 1860 Voltigeur). He then won the Doncaster Stakes, beating William I'Anson's Borealis (b f 1860 Newminster) and was among the field for the Grand Prix De Paris, won by The Ranger. By all accounts he ran the race of his life for the St. Leger at Doncaster being at one point "fully fifty lengths in the rear of everything" but, with all credit due his jockey John Osborne, made his way through the field and finally past the Oaks winner Queen Bertha to win by half a length.

In 1864 he ran second for the Newmarket Claret Stakes, won by Rapid Rhone, went unplaced for the Ascot Gold Cup, won by Scottish Chief (b c 1861 Lord Of The Isles), went unplaced for the Chesterfield Cup at Goodwood, won by King Of Utopia (br c 1860 King Of Trumps), walked over for 100 sovs, and retired from the turf.
 
 
Hawthornden (1867)
 
 
He covered at the Moorlands stud in Yorkshire, getting stock which were said to come mostly as whole-coloured dark bays without markings. His sons were thought to lack his size and power and were "inclined to shortness". Some of his notable offspring include Hawthornden (b c 1867) who won the St Leger and went to Australia, Buckden (b c 1869) who did well as a stallion in America, Hymenaeus (b c 1869) who won the Deutsches Derby and garnered champion sire status for Lord Clifden in Germany, the St Leger winner Wenlock (b c 1869), the champion sire Hampton (b c 1872), and the Two Thousand Guineas and St Leger winner Petrarch (b c 1873).

Mr Gee purchased Lord Clifden for his Dewhurst Lodge Farm at Wadhurst, Sussex, for £4000 but unfortunately lost him in February of 1875.

   
Hampton (GB)
   
   

Hampton





Francis Charles Granville Egerton
(1847-1914), 3rd Earl Of Ellesmere,
maintained properties at Worsley, near
Manchester, at Stetchworth Park, near
Newmarket, and at Brackley, Northamptonshire.
He owned Hampton for his entire stud career.






Hampton b c 1872 (Lord Clifden - Lady Langden, by Kettledrum). Family 10-a.

Bred at Tetsworth in Oxfordshire by Montagu Arthur Bertie (1836-1928), Lord Norreys, who succeeded as 7th Earl Of Abingdon, Hampton was the first foal of his dam and said to be on the small side, standing scarcely 15.2 hands, and not likely to catch the eye in passing, however, he was a grandson of the "scarcely taller than a pony" Haricot (see Queen Mary). He was sired by a St Leger winner from a mare sired by a Derby winner, Kettledrum (ch c 1858 Rataplan) and was a half brother to a Derby winner, Sir Bevys (br c 1876 Favonius), which seems an unlikely pedigree for a selling plater or a hurdler.

However, whilst passing through a number of hands Hampton contested both types of events during his career on the turf. Some of his owners and trainers included Mr Ireland, James Nightingall, B C Harvey, F G Hobson, Robert Peck and finally Lord Ellesmere, who purchased him at the end of 1878 for 7,200gs. As Joe Palmer (see Names In Pedigrees) succinctly put it, "His ancestry was as illustrious as the line he founded, and perhaps Hampton is to be regarded, not so much as an underling which got to the top, as an aristocrat which fell for a time into bad company".
Hampton Lord Clifden Newminster Touchstone
Beeswing
The Slave Melbourne
Volley
Lady Langden Kettledrum Rataplan
Hybla
Haricot Lanercost
Queen Mary
He was on the turf for 5 years, running in 33 races, not including those over jumps. He won 19 of these. He did not contest any classics and his finest year was 1877 when he won 8 of 10.

In 1874 running as an unnamed colt for Mr Ireland he won a Maiden Plate at Oxford, beating Jutland (b c 1872 Denmark) by a short head. He then won the South-Western Stakes at Hampton, beating Peep O'Day (b f 1872 Caractacus); this was a selling race and James Nightingall paid 200gs for him and named him after the race course. At Brighton he won the Two Years Old Stakes, beating Pommelo (br f 1872 Lecturer) by a neck, also a selling race but he was bought in by Nightingall for 150gs. Still running in the name of trainer Nightingall he was by this time owned by B C Harvey. He next finished 3° for the Nursery Handicap at the Warwickshire and Leamington Hunt course, won by Seymour (br c 1872 Lord Clifden), followed by Trappist (b c 1872 Hermit) and was among the field for the Second Nursery Handicap at the same place, won by Woodpecker (br c 1872 Orest).

In 1875 he won the Great Welcome Handicap at Croyden, beating Industrious (b c 1871 Blair Athol) by a head, the Great Metropolitan Stakes at Epsom, beating Temple Bar (ch c 1872 Trumpeter) by a head, and finished 2° for the Claremont Handicap at Sandown Park, won by Snail (br c 1870 Esca). He was among the very large field for the Cesarewitch at Newmarket, won by Duke Of Parma (br c 1872 The Duke) and similarly unplaced for the Brighton Autumn Handicap, won by Peto (br g 1869 Adventurer). Following the flat racing season Hampton tried his luck over hurdles, winning one race and finishing 2° for another.

In 1876, running for F G Hobson he won the Goodwood Stakes, beating Admiral Byng (br c 1872 Brother To Strafford) and Finis (b c 1871 Marsyas). He was unplaced for the Doncaster Cup, won by Craig Millar (ch c 1872 Blair Athol) and Controversy (b c 1871 Lambton or The Miner). He was also unplaced for the Cesarewitch, won by Rosebery (b c 1872 Speculum) and Woodlands (ch c 1872 Nutbourne).

In 1877 he won the Northumberland Plate (2m) at Newcastle-Upon-Tyne by a short head, beating Glendale (ch c 1873 Blair Athol) and Mars (b g 1872 Mandrake). Next, giving 33lb to the first horse, he was unplaced for the Goodwood Stakes (2.5m), won by Prince George (b c 1873 Toxophilite) and Gloucester (br c 1873 Parmesan). Then he won the Goodwood Cup by a length and a half, beating Skylark (b c 1873 King Tom) and Charon (br c 1873 Hermit). He next was unplaced for the Great Ebor Handicap at York ("such a sea of mud and water"), won by Il Gladiatore (b c 1874 Gladiateur) and the appropriately named Mrs. Pond (b f 1874 Parmesan). He won his next 6, starting with the Doncaster Cup which he won by 2 lengths, beating Chesterton (b c 1874 Montagnard) and Thorn (ch c 1870 King Of Trumps). He also the won the Kelso Gold Cup, beating Strathmore (ch c 1874 Mandrake) receiving 32lb, and Glendale. Next he walked over for Her Majesty's Plate at Edinburgh. Following this he won a second Royal Plate at Edinburgh, beating Hunger (ch c 1874 The Earl or Vienna) who got 35lb. Then he won Caledonian Centenary Cup, beating First Spring (b c 1874 Parmesan) who got 29lb. He won a third Royal Plate at Newmarket by a length and a half, beating the French-breds, Pornic (b c 1874 Dollar) and Augusta (ch f 1873 Mortemer).

In 1878, running for Lord Ellesmere, he won Her Majesty's Plate (2m) at Northampton by 6 lengths, beating Sheldrake (b c 1874 Mandrake), only 2 ran. Next he won the (1.5m) Epsom Gold Cup by a length, beating the French-bred Jockey Club Stakes winner Verneuil (ch c 1874 Mortemer) and Lord Clive (ch c 1875 Lord Clifden). He was last for the Ascot Gold Cup (2.5m), won by Verneuil, the Derby and St Leger winner Silvio (b c 1874 Blair Athol), and the Grand Prix De Paris winner St. Christophe (ch c 1874 Mortmer), only 4 started. He was then 2° for the Goodwood Stakes (2.5m), won by Norwich (ch c 1874 St. Albans) and beating Strathmore. Following this he won Her Majesty's Plate at York, beating Glendale and Childe Harold (b c 1875 Brother To Strafford). He then finished 2° for the Doncaster Cup (2m 5f), won by the Chester Cup winner Pageant (b g 1871 Elland), beating Kingsclere (b c 1874 Lord Clifden). He walked over for Her Majesty's Plate at Lichfield. Then he won Her Majesty's Plate at Newmarket by 2 lengths, beating Verneuil and Winchilsea (br c 1874 John Davis). Carrying the top weight he finished 4° for the Cambridgeshire, won by the mighty Isonomy (b c 1875 Sterling) and Touchet, 38 ran. In his last race he was unplaced for the Jockey Club Cup, won by Silvio and the French-bred Prix Du Jockey Club winner Insulaire (bl c 1875 Dutch Skater).

In 1879 Hampton retired to his owner's Worseley Hall Stud Farm, near Manchester, with a  fee of 30gs. He was later moved to His Lordship's Stetchworth Park stud and in 1885 his fee rose to 100gs. By 1890 his fee was 150gs.
 

Royal Hampton (1882)

Merry Hampton (1884)

Ladas (1891)
 
Hampton was considered a fine stayer and got many high-class sons and splendid broodmare daughters. Among these were the 2000 Guineas and Derby winner Ayrshire (br c 1885) and, perhaps most significantly, the City And Suburban winner Bay Ronald (b c 1893), as from the latter came the line leading to Hyperion (ch c 1930 Gainsborough). Other notables among his sons were
(1) Royal Hampton (b c 1882), as a two year old, won the National Breeders' Produce Stakes at Sandown Park, placing 2° for the Richmond Stakes at Goodwood, 3° for the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, and dead-heated for 3° for the Middle Park Plate. As a three year old he finished 3° to Melton for the Derby. As a four year old he won the City And Suburban at Epsom beating 16 others. Bred by William Blenkiron he stood 16 hands and girthed slightly more than 74 inches. He covered at the Childwick Stud where he got, among many others, Court Card (b f 1890) dam of Irish Derby winner St. Brendan (br c 1899 Hackler), Marcion (ch c 1890) the Ascot Gold Cup winner, and Kirkconnel (b c 1892) the 2000 Guineas winner.
(2) Merry Hampton (b c 1884), won the Derby by 4 lengths and finished 2° for the St Leger to Kilwarlin and 4° for the Grand Prix De Paris to Tenebreuse. Bred in Yorkshire by J Crowther-Harrison he was purchased as a yearling by George Baird for 3,200 guineas. He never ran before the Derby. He stood 16.1 hands and his girth measured 72 inches. In the stud he got two famous daughters, Merry Token (b f 1891) the grandam of Man O'War (ch c 1917 Fair Play) and Merry Wife (br f 1891), dam of Ascot Gold Cup winner Santoi (bbr c 1897 Queen's Birthday).
(3) Ladas (b c 1891) was bred by the 5th Earl Of Rosebery and stood a little over 16 hands. He won 4  races as a two year old, the Woodcote Stakes, Middle Park Plate, Champagne Stakes and Coventry Stakes. As a three year old he won the 2000 Guineas, the Derby and the Newmarket Stakes. He finished 2° for the St Leger and Eclipse Stakes and 3° for the Princess Of Wales's Stakes. He covered at the Mentmore Stud, Leighton Buzzard, for a fee of 49 sovereigns. Among others he got the St Leger winner Troutbeck (bbr c 1903) and the 2000 Guineas winner Gorgos (br c 1903).
 
 
Perdita (1881)
 
 
Hampton's noteworthy daughters include
(1) the worthy Perdita (b f 1881), dam of Florizel (br c 1891 St. Simon), Persimmon (b c 1893 St. Simon) and Diamond Jubliee (b c 1897 St. Simon),
(2) the 1000 Guineas and Oaks winner Reve D'Or (ch f 1884),
(3) Maid Marian (br f 1886), dam of Grafton (br c 1894 Galopin) who was an outstanding stallion in Australia and of Polymelus (b c 1902 Cyllene) who was an outstanding stallion in England and
(4) Fota (b f 1889), dam of the Oaks winner Glass Doll (b f 1904 Isinglass) and grandam of the stallion North Star (ch c 1914 Sunstar) who did well in America.

Hampton was champion sire in 1887 and champion broodmare sire in 1900. In his later years he had been plagued by rheumatism and he was humanely destroyed December 8, 1897.
   
Ayrshire (GB)
   
   

Ayrshire
Photograph by Clarence Hailey





William John Arthur Charles James
Cavendish-Bentinck (1857-1943),
6th Duke of Portland, owned two of
the most significant stallions in the
latter half of the 19th century and
the beginning of the 20th century -
St. Simon and Carbine.




Atalanta
Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred

Ayrshire b c 1885 (Hampton - Atalanta, by Galopin). Family 8-h.

Bred by the 6th Duke of Portland, he was a half brother to Melanion (b c 1886 Hermit) who was later a stallion in Italy, and a full brother to Sussex Stakes winner, the ill-fated Troon (b c 1892), who slipped during the running of the Prince Edward Handicap at Newmarket, fell on the rails and died instantly. Ayshire was described as "possessed of a fine constitution and good temper, but was exceedingly high-couraged..."

His dam, Atalanta, "a really fine stamp of a mare," was half sister to St. Serf (br c 1887 St. Simon), and won 5 races for the Duke. According to the General Stud Book Atalanta was bred by Lord Rosslyn, however, Joe Palmer (see Names In Pedigrees) says that she was purchased as a foal with her dam: "The foal had been badly injured and could hardly stand when delivery was made, and there was considerable discussion, quite good-natured, about the price to be paid for it. Finally the foal, later to be named Atalanta, changed hands for seven shillings and sixpence (about $2), a wheelbarrow, and a service to Lord Rosslyn`s boar pig." Ayrshire was her second foal.
Ayrshire Hampton Lord Clifden Newminster
The Slave
Lady Langden Kettledrum
Haricot
Atalanta Galopin Vedette
Flying Duchess
Feronia Thormanby
Woodbine
Trained by George Dawson at Heath House, Ayrshire ran for 3 years in 16 races and won 11 of them, earning £36,564. As a two year old he started 7 times and won the last 5 in a row, unfortunately knocking his leg in the Champagne Stakes which left him unable to contest the Middle Park Plate. As a three year old he won both the 2000 Guineas and the Derby, although there was some doubt that he was good enough to defeat Friar's Balsam (see Hermit) who had easily beaten him as a two year old. Following the Derby he threw a splint that interrupted his training, and as it turned out, he was among the field for the St Leger which was won by Seabreeze (ch f 1885 Isonomy) who was generally conceded to be the best horse of that year. As a four year old he won his first 2, then broke down in Champion Stakes, which terminated his turf career.

In 1887 he finished 3° for the Whitsuntide Plate at Manchester, won by Briar-Root (b f 1885 Springfield) who subsequentlt won the 1000 Guineas, and Caerlaverock (b c 1885 Isonomy). He also finished 3° for the New Stakes at Ascot, won by Friar's Balsam (ch c 1885 Hermit) and the future St Leger winner Seabreeze. Then he won the Bibury Club Home-Bred Foal Stakes, beating Challenge (b f 1885 Hermit) and Irgunder (ch c 1885 Hermit). Next he easily won the Royal Plate at Windsor by 3 lengths, beating Hark (ch c 1885 Reverberation) and Toscano (ch c 1885 Petrarch). He also won the Chesterfield Stakes at Newmarket by half a length, beating Bartizan (b c 1885 Barcaldine) and Winkfield (ch c 1885 Barcaldine). His next win came in the Prince Of Wales's (Post) Stakes at Goodwood, beating Simon Pure (br c 1885 Peter) by 3 lengths and Juggler (ch c 1885 Touchet). In his last race of the year he won the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster by 2 lengths, beating Marmiton (br c 1885 Galopin) and Caerlaverock.

In 1888 he won the Riddlesworth (Post) Stakes at Newmarket by 20 lengths, beating the aptly-named Disappointment (b f 1885 Fiddler), only 2 started. He then won the 2000 Guineas by 2 lengths, beating his stable companion Johnny Morgan (b c 1885 Springfield) and Orbit (ch c 1885 Bend Or). He also won the Derby by 2 lengths, beating Crowberry (ch c 1885 Rosebery) and Van Diemen's Land (ch c 1885 Robert The Devil). Although he started favourite he was, however, unplaced for the St Leger, won by Seabreeze and Chillington (br c 1885 Chippendale). He finished 2° for the 7f Lancashire Plate at Manchester, won by Seabreeze, beating Le Sancy (gr c 1884 Atlantic). His final outing of the year produced a length win in the Great Foal Stakes at Newmarket, beating the Doncaster Cup winner Grafton (b c 1885 Galopin) and Surbiton (b c 1884 Hampton).

In 1889 he won the 1m 2f Kempton Park Royal Stakes by three-quarters of a length, beating Seabreeze and his half-brother Melanion (b c 1886 Hermit). Next he won the 1m 2f Eclipse Stakes at Sandown Park by 2 lengths, beating the Prince Of Wales's Stakes winner El Dorado (br c 1886 Sterling) and Seclusion (ch f 1886 Hermit). In his final race he finished 3° of 4 for the 1m 2f Champion Stakes at Newmarket, won by Gold (ch c 1886 Sterling) and Antibes (ch f 1886 Isonomy), beating Enthusiast (ch c 1886 Sterling).
 

Symington (1893)

Robert Le Diable (1899)

Festino (1902)
 
He covered at Egerton House, Newmarket, for a fee of 150gs. Among his sons were
(1) Symington (b c 1893), who was bred by Douglas Baird and won the Exeter Stakes at Newmarket as a two year old and the Duke Of York Stakes at York as a three year old before he was purchased by Edward Kennedy in 1905 for 1000 guineas. He covered at the Straffan Station stud for a fee of 98 sovereigns and went on to become a popular stallion in Ireland. He stood 16 hands, and got no chesnuts. He got Junior (br c 1909), winner of the Ebor Handicap and Chesterfield and Manchester Cups.
(2) Bowling Brook (b c 1895) went to America and there won the Belmont Stakes and the Metropolitan Handicap.
(3) Solitaire (b c 1896) won both the Champion Stakes and Queen's Vase before travelling to America and there becoming a stallion.
(4) Robert Le Diable (b c 1899) was French-bred although he came to England to win the Doncaster Cup, City And Suburban Stakes and the Duke Of York Stakes. He got Wrack (b c 1909) before he went to Austria-Hungary.
(5) Festino (br c 1902) was bred in the Waldfried stud in Germany and won the Grosser Preis Von Berlin before taking up stallion duties there.
(6) Traquair (ch c 1904) suffered from wind infirmities but displayed brilliant form winning the July Stakes, Woodcote Stakes, Coventry Stakes and National Stakes before export to Australia.
 

Traquair (1904)
   
 
His daughters included
(1) Airs And Graces (br f 1895) who won the Oaks before she went to France, and there got Jardy (b c 1902) a leading sire in Argentina, and Fils Du Vent (b c 1906) who became a highly regarded stallion in Poland.
(2) Our Lassie (b f 1900) won the Oaks Stakes and became the ancestress of Jacopo (br c 1928 Sansovino) and Khaled (b c 1943 Hyperion), both stallions in America, and 2000 Guineas winner Wollow (b c 1973 Wolver Hollow).
(3) Ayrslave (br f 1910) became the dam of the leading sire in Uruguay, Air Raid (bbr c 1915 Willonyx).

Ayrshire died in 1910.
   
Bay Ronald (GB)
   
   

Bay Ronald in France shortly before his
death, photograph by Clarence Hailey





Henry Leonard Campbell Brassey
(1870-1958), 1st Baron Of Apethorpe,
was a member of the Jockey Club for
60 years and elevated to the peerage
in 1938. He won the 1000 Guineas in
1900 with Winifreda (b f 1897 St. Simon)
but is probably better known for his
stewardship of Bay Ronald.
Bay Ronald b c 1893 (Hampton - Black Duchess, by Galliard). Family 3-o.

He was bred by T Phillips in the Leybourne Grange Stud, Kent, where nearly 30 years before Sir Joseph Hawley had bred the Derby winner Blue Gown and the Ascot Stakes winner Rosicrucian. Bay Ronald was sent to Doncaster sales as a yearling but failed to make his reserve of 500gs. Trainer Thomas Jennings (the younger) wrote to Mr Brassey and suggested he have look since he lived close to Leybourne Grange.

His dam, Black Duchess, was also the great grandam of Blandford (br c 1919 Swynford). After Bay Ronald won the Limekiln Stakes in 1896 she was purchased from Mr Phillips by Lord Brassey at a Knightsbridge sale for 500gs.

His owner felt Bay Ronald "grew into a beautiful and most blood-like stallion, with a very perfect head and neck". In his later years he was pronouncedly over at the knee.
Bay Ronald Hampton Lord Clifden Newminster
The Slave
Lady Langden Kettledrum
Haricot
Black Duchess Galliard Galopin
Mavis
Black Corrie Sterling
Wild Dayrell Mare
Trained by Tom Jennings at Phantom House, Newmarket, Bay Ronald ran for 4 years in 26 races, won 5 of these, and earned £7,827. He was sufficiently slow in coming to hand that he didn't win his first race until nearly the end of his three year old year. In a letter to A E T Watson (see Bloodstock Breeders' Review, 1915), Mr Brassey set forth his thoughts on Bay Ronald's racing career: "As a five year old Bay Ronald won the City and Suburban and the Epsom Cup, beating Newhaven II and Winkfield's Pride. He was then trained for the Ascot Cup, in which he ran unplaced. My action in this matter was scarcely judicious. The horse never showed ability to stay more than a mile and a half, and a severe preparation for the Cup, followed by a race on hard ground, in all probability had a permanently adverse effect. I think Bay Ronald was never afterwards in the form he was when he so easily won the Epsom Cup. Though Bay Ronald achieved a fair amount of success on the racecourse one cannot describe him as having been quite a first-class racehorse. His form was certainly somewhat variable, this being accounted for, I think, by the fact that his constitution as a young horse was not of a very robust character, and strong preparations for long distance races may have rather taken the steel out of him later on."

In 1895 he finished 3° for the Stanley Stakes at Epsom, won by Devil-May-Care (ch c 1893 Chittabob) and Froward (br c 1893 Brag). He was then unplaced for the Windsor Castle Stakes at Alexandria Park, won by Cushendall (ch c 1893 Timothy) and Attainment (b f 1893 Wisdom). He was likewise unplaced for the Lavant Stakes at Goodwood, won in a dead heat by both Flitters (b f 1893 Galopin) and Omladina (br f 1893 Royal Hampton). He was also among the field for the Middle Park Plate, won by St. Frusquin (br c 1893 St. Simon) and Omladina. He was yet again unplaced for the Dewhurst Plate, won by St. Frusquin and Knight Of The Thistle (b c 1893 Rosebery).

In 1896 he finished 4° for the 9f Newmarket Stakes, won by Galeazzo (b c 1893 Galopin), Balsamo (br c 1893 Friar's Balsam) and Bradwardine (bbr c 1893 Barcaldine). He was among the field for the Derby, won by Persimmon (b c 1893 St. Simon) and St. Frusquin. He then finished 3° of 4 for the 1m 4f Ascot Derby, won by Conroy (b c 1893 Bend Or) and Positano (br c 1893 St. Simon), beating Carton Pierre (br f 1893 Chippendale). Next he was unplaced for the 1m 4f Hardwicke Stakes at Ascot, won by Shaddock (b c 1893 St. Serf) and Dunrobin (b c 1893 Hampton). He was also unplaced for the 1m 4f Jockey Club Stakes at Newmarket, won by Persimmon and Sir Visto (b c 1892 Barcaldine). He then won the 1m 2f Lowther Stakes at Newmarket by 3 lengths, beating Avilion (ch f 1893 Cameliard) and the Molecomb Stakes winner Rampion (ch c 1893 Amphion). He also won the 1m Limekiln Stakes at Newmarket by a length, beating Avilion and Balsamo. For his final race of the year he was among the field for a 1m 2f Free Handicap Sweepstakes at Newmarket, won by Gulistan (ch c 1893 Brag) and the 1000 Guineas winner Thais (br f 1893 St. Serf).

In 1897 he finished 2° for the 9f City And Suburban Handicap at Epsom, won by Balsamo, beating the Oaks winner La Sagesse (b f 1892 Wisdom). Giving 14lb he then won the 1m 4f Hardwicke Stakes at Ascot by 2 lengths, beating Lowly (b f 1894 Common) and Mr Bass's (b c 1894 St. Serf). He next finished 3° for the 9f Eclipse Stakes at Sandown Park, won by Persimmon and Velasquez (b c 1894 Donovan). He followed this with a 2° place finish for the 9f Champion Stakes, won by Velasquez, beating Dosser (b c 1893 Belgrave). Then he was among the field for the 1m 4f Cambridgshire, won by Comfrey (b c 1894 Despair) and the American-bred St. Cloud (b c 1894 Candlemas). He was similarly unplaced for the 1m 3f Liverpool Autumn Handicap, won by Chiselhampton (b c 1893 Hampton) and General Peace (br c 1894 Gallinule).

In 1898 he won the City And Suburban Handicap by 2 lengths, beating the Australian-bred Melbourne Cup winner Newhaven (ch c 1893 Newminster) and Craftsman (b c 1895 Crafton). After this he won the 1m 4f Epsom Cup by 2 lengths, beating Newhaven and Winkfield's Pride (ch c 1893 Winkfield). Then he was among the field for the 2m 4f Gold Cup at Ascot, won by the French-bred Elf (ch c 1893 Upas) and the Chester Cup winner The Rush (ch c 1892 Barcaldine). The next day he finished 2° for the 1m 4f Hardwicke Stakes, won by Collar (b c 1895 St. Simon), beating Cortegar (b f 1894 Galliard). He then finished 2° for the 1m 2f Champion Stakes, won by Velasquez, beating Goblin (b c 1895 Goldfinch), only 3 started. Two days later he finished 3° of 3 for the Lowther Stakes at Newmarket, won by Ninus (b c 1895 Sheen) and Batt (br c 1895 Sheen). In his final race he again finished 3° of 3 for the 2m 2f Jockey Club Stakes at Newmarket, won by the Australian-bred future Ascot Gold Cup winner Merman (ch c 1892 Grand Flaneur) and The Rush.

He retired to the Preston Stud Farm at Aylesford, Kent for the fee of 24 sovereigns, with the provision that dams of winners of 500 sovereigns would be served for free. His fee later rose as high as 150gs. His sons and grandsons gave evidence of staying ability and transmitted this to their offspring. Macdonald (br c 1901), foaled in France, won the Prix Royal Oak and got a Nemzeti dij winner in Oreg Lak (br c 1912) and a Poule D'Essai Des Poulains winner in McKinley (br c 1916). Dark Ronald (bbr c 1905) won a number of good races in England and left many good offspring at home before going to Prussia and making his mark there. Bayardo (b c 1906) was a top-class racehorse and stallion. Combourg (b c 1908) won the Prix Royal Oak and Prix Du Cadran and had some success in the stud in France.

His daughters also had success, among them Rondeau (b f 1900) who foaled the Prix Des Trois Ans (a wartime substitute for the Prix Du Jockey Club) winner Teddy (b c 1913 Ajax) who went on to become a leading sire in France and give America his notable sons Sir Gallahad (b c 1920) and Bull Dog (bbr c 1927) and his daughter La Troienne (b f 1926). Rose Ronald (b f 1901) became the ancestress of the likes of Irish Derby winner Panaslipper (ch c 1952 Solar Slipper) and Ascot Gold Cup and Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe winner Levmoss (b c 1965 Le Levanstell). Ronna (br f 1905) foaled Chester Vase winner Esplanadian (br c 1912 Amadis).

In the aforementioned letter, above, Mr Brassey relates that at the Newmarket December sales in 1899 that Prince Pierre D'Arenberg and Comte De Pourtales dropped by Tom Jenning's stables one evening, the first having just bought Myrtledine, and were discussing her future plans. Mr Brassey convinced them to breed her to Bay Ronald, the result being Macdonald, winner in 1904 of Prix Royal Oak and in 1905 of the Prix Du Conseil De Paris.

In 1905 Dark Ronald was still a foal and Bayardo was still being carried by his dam when Mr Brassey was persuaded to sell Bay Ronald to French interests for 5000gs.

Bay Ronald died in France in 1907 at the age of 14 years.
   
Dark Ronald (IRE)
   
   

Dark Ronald
Photograph by Clarence Hailey




Edward "Cub" Kennedy (1860-1925),
combined his property at Hazlehatch
with a farm he bought at Baronrath, a few
miles from Straffan and the whole became
the Straffan Station Stud. He purchased
the French-bred Roi Hérode, having seen
him beat Dark Ronald in 1909, and bred
The Tetrarch, one of the most phenomenal
horses ever seen on the turf.

Dark Ronald bbr c 1905 (Bay Ronald - Darkie, by Thurio). Family 9-b.

A handsome substantial horse standing 16.1 hands, he was bred in Ireland by Edward Kennedy. In 1892 Kennedy had purchased his dam, Darkie (bl f 1899), from John Hammond of Newmarket, who won the 1884 Derby with St. Gatien in a dead heat with Harvester. Darkie ran 5 times in 1891, 4 times in selling races, but 3 times managed a 3° place fnish, including in the Ramsay Abbey Plate at Huntingdon. In the stud Darkie was the dam of the Gimcrack Stakes winner Désirée (br f 1902 Velasquez), who was also sent to Germany. Kennedy sold Dark Ronald to Sir Abe Bailey at the Doncaster Yearling Sales for 1300gs.
Dark Ronald Bay Ronald Hampton Lord Clifden
Lady Langden
Black Duchess Galliard
Black Corrie
Darkie Thurio Tibthorpe/Cremorne
Verona
Insignia Blair Athol
Decoration
Dark Ronald ran for 2 years, starting 7 times, winning 4 races and earning £8,288. He ran only twice as a two year old because of injury and then had his forelegs pinfired. He was sent to South Africa to recuperate and did not run as a three year old. He was back the next year and displayed a fine turn of speed winning the Royal Hunt Cup and stamina sufficient to stay the mile and a half of the Princess Of Wales's Stakes.

In 1907 he won the Hurst Park Foal Plate by a head, beating Quelpart (b c 1905 Grey Leg) and Understudy (b c 1905 Eager). He also finished 2° for the Great Foal Plate at Lingfield Park, won by Little Flutter (b c 1905 Missel Thrush), beating Silent Lady (b f 1905 Missel Thrush).

In 1909 he was unplaced in his first race back, the 1m Newbury Spring Cup, won by Arranmore (b c 1905 Succoth or Enthusiast) and Royal Realm (b c 1905 Persimmon). Next he won the 9f Durham Plate by 3 lengths, beating Huckle My Buff (b c 1906 Isinglass) and Waterbury (ch f 1906 Jaquemart). He followed this with a smart 2 length win in the 7f+ Royal Hunt Cup at Ascot Heath, beating Arranmore and the Cambridgeshire winner Christmas Daisy (b c 1905 Vitez). He started favourite of 23 runners. He also won his next race, the 1m 4f Princess Of Wales's Stakes by 2 lengths, beating the Hardwicke Stakes winner Primer (b c 1905 St. Simon) and the St Leger winner Your Majesty (b c 1905 Persimmon). In his final race he finished 3° for the 2m 1f Doncaster Cup, won by the Queen's Vase winner Amadis (b c 1906 Love Wisely) and the French-bred Grand Prix De Vichy winner Roi Hérode (gr c 1904 Le Samaritain).

He retired to the Tickford Park Stud of Donald Fraser at a fee of 98 sovereigns, which later rose to 148 sovereigns. He spent only 3 seasons in England but got a number of very good horses, including the highly successful Son-In-Law (b c 1911) who was to become an important influence for stamina.
 

Ambassador (1911)

Brown Prince (1914)

Magpie (1914)
 
Ambassador (br c 1911) won the Chippenham Plate and the July Stakes and lost the Cambridgeshire by a head, then went to Claiborne Farm in Kentucky where he got the two year old champion racehorse St. James (b c 1921). St. James, in turn, got another two year old champion, Jamestown (b c 1928). In his turn he got the Kentucky Derby  and Belmont Stakes winner Johnstown (b c 1936).

Brown Prince (br c 1914) won the Jockey Club Stakes at Newmarket and the Cambridgeshire, went to America and sired the Clark Handicap winner Helen's Babe (b f 1923) and the Travers Stakes winner Brown Bud (br c 1924). His daughter Princess Adele (br f 1922) became the granddam of the Alabama Stakes winner Compliance (br f 1945).

Dark Legend (bbr c 1914) finished 3° in Gay Crusader's Derby, then won the Calcutta Gold Cup and the Queen Elizabeth II Cup in South Africa, then went to stud in France and got the Goodwood Cup winner Dark Japan (br c 1923), the 1941 leading sire in Sweden Monsieur D'Ypres (b c 1923) and the stallion Easton (b c 1931). His daughter Rosy Legend (br f 1931) became the dam of the Derby winner Dante (br c 1942 Nearco) and the St Leger winner Sayajirao. He also got the 1000 Guineas and Oaks winner Galatea (br f 1936).

Magpie (bl c 1914), a grandson of the 1000 Guineas winner Chelandry (br f 1894), was beaten only a head for the 2000 Thousand Guineas by Gay Crusader and then went to Australia where he got the Melbourne Cup winner Windbag (b c 1921) and was a leading sire of broodmares in 1952.

Dark Ronald also sired some good daughters, among them Vaucluse (b f 1912), who won the 1000 Guineas and foaled the Jockey Club Stakes and Doncaster Cup winner Bongrace (b f 1923). One of his best known daughters, Popingaol (br f 1913), was the matriarch of a very successful family, having produced the Oaks winner Pogrom (b f 1919 Lemberg), the St Leger winner Book Law (b f 1924) who became the dam of the stallion Rhodes Scholar (b c 1933), Book Debt (br f 1925) who became the dam of the 2000 Guineas winner Pay Up (br c 1933) and Tolbooth (b f 1929) the ancestress of the Derby Italiano winner Traghetto (ch c 1942). Breathing Spell (b f 1914) was exported to America and became the grandam of the Kentucky Derby winner Gallahadion (b c 1937).
 

Prunus (1915)

Herold (1917)

Wallenstein (1917)
 
In 1913 Dark Ronald was sold to the Government Of Prussia for £25,000 and assumed his duties at Gestüt Graditz. His legacy there was immeasurable and not limited to bloodstock breeding as he also contributed to the evolution of the warmblood horses. To mention only a few offspring, he got
(1) the Mehl-Mülhens-Rennen and Deutsches St Leger winner Prunus (b c 1915) who went on to become a leading sire 5 times and getting, among others, the 9 times leading sire Oleander (b c 1924).
(2) Herold (br c 1917) was a Deutsches Derby and St Leger winner who led the sires list twice and got another Deutsches Derby winner in Alchimist (br c 1930) who also led the sires list twice. Alchimist's son Birkhahn (b c 1945) was the third generation of Deutsches Derby winners and a leading sire 3 times, and got another leading sire in Priamos (br c 1964). Another of Herold's sons, St Leger winner Arjaman (br c 1930), was leading sire once; his son Olymp was a St Leger winner and also once a leading sire.
(3) Wallenstein (b c 1917) won the Grosser Preis Von Berlin and became leading sire in 1930.

Dark Ronald was a leading sire in Germany in 1921 and 1922. He died at Gestüt Titerfeld in the spring of 1928 at the age of twenty-three.
   
Son-In-Law (GB)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred





Sir Abraham "Abe" Bailey (1864-1940),
1st Bt Of Cradock, South Africa, owned many
farms in the Cape Colony and over a span of
nearly 50 years on the turf won all of the
important races there. In England his racing
compatriot was Donald Fraser who owned the
Tickford Park Stud at Newport Pagnell in
Buckinghamshire. Bailey won the Oaks with
Lovely Rosa in 1936.


Son-In-Law br c 1911 (Dark Ronald - Mother-In-Law, by Matchmaker). Family 5-d.

Bred by Sir Abe Bailey at the Tickford Park Stud, Son-In-Law had no great luminaries in his immediate family although his great grandam, Reticence (b f 1874 Vespasian), was a half sister to the Derby winner and 7 time champion sire Hermit. Bailey's friend and fellow turf enthusiast, Donald Fraser, acquired Be Cannie (ch f 1891) and her foal in 1901 for 30 guineas and had also owned Matchmaker, the sire of Mother-In-Law (b f 1906). Mother-In-Law won £2,025 and produced 4 minor winners besides Son-In-Law. Donald Fraser always claimed the General Stud Book was incorrect in recording Bailey as the breeder of Son-In-Law, nevertheless, Bailey owned Mother-In-Law when Son-In-Law was foaled, the standard by which such things are measured.

Son-In-Law was the first offspring of both his parents. A horse with an iron constitution he was said to have never had so much as a sniffle his entire life. He spent a number of years in Buckinghamshire when he first went to stud, however, he was regarded as a Newmarket "fixture" with "remarkable vitality and individuality" which he displayed throughout his long tenure there.
Son-In-Law Dark Ronald Bay Ronald Hampton
Black Duchess
Darkie Thurio
Insignia
Mother-In-Law Matchmaker Donovan
Match Girl
Be Cannie Jock Of Oran
Reticence
Trained by Reg Day at Terrace House, Newmarket, he raced for 4 years. He won 8 of 18 races, all at lengths of 1m 4f or better. His earnings amounted to £5,546 which would probably have been higher but for WW 1. He ran in a couple of selling plates as a two year old, but as a three year old won the Cesarewitch, which had the largest field in some 40 years, in record time. Later that night there was a Zeppelin raid on London.

In 1913 he finished 2° for the Two Years Old (Selling) Plate at Newmarket First October, won by the American-bred Tears And Smiles (ch c 1911 Broomstick), beating Retrospect (b f 1911 Roquelaure). He was then unplaced for the Two Years Old (Selling) Plate at Newmarket Second October, won by Dolabella (b f 1911 White Eagle) and Deslina (b f 1911 Desmond). In his last race of the year he was also unplaced for the Criterion Nursery Handicap at Newmarket Houghton, won by Wild Arum (bbr f 1911 Robert Le Diable) and Raeburn's Glass (b g 1911 Rising Glass).

In 1914 he was among the field for the 1m Wood Ditton Stakes at Newmarket, won by Sunny Lake (ch c 1911 Sundridge) and Lancashire Lass (b f 1911 John O'Gaunt). He then won his first race by 8 lengths, the 1m 4f Mildenhall Plate at Newmarket, beating Towyn (br c 1910 Llangibby) and Barium (ch c 1911 Radium). Next he was unplaced for the 9f Newmarket Stakes, won by Corcyra (ch c 1911 Polymelus) and Brakespear (b c 1911 Spearmint). He followed this with a win in the 1m 4f Londesborough Plate at York by a length and a half, beating Speron (b g 1911 Spearmint) and Amaroseate (ch c 1911 St. Amant). He was unplaced for the 1m Addlestone Plate at Kempton Park, won by Gay Lally (ch c 1911 Lally) and Sunny Lake. He next finished 3° for the 1m 4f Newbury Summer Cup, won by Florist (b c 1910 Florizel) and Marten (ch c 1911 Marco). He was then among the field for the 2m Gold Vase at Ascot Heath, won by Glorvina (b f 1911 Desmond) and Cincinnatus (b c 1911 Santoi). He won the next one by a head, the 1m 4f Dullingham Plate at Newmarket, beating Cincinnatus and Lancashire Lass. He also won the 2m 5f Goodwood Cup by a head, beating At Last (b f 1910 Great Scot) and Florist. He was next unplaced for the 2m Prince Edward Handicap at Manchester, won by Bowman (ch c 1909) and Fiz Yama (br c 1909 Santoi). He won his final race of the year, the 2m 2f Jockey Club Cup at Newmarket, beating his only opponent, the French-bred Gondovar (ch g 1910 Le Var), by 2 lengths.

In 1915 he began the year by going unplaced for the 1m 4f June Stakes, won by the St Leger winner Black Jester (br c 1911 Polymelus) and Passport (br c 1912 King's Messenger). Then he had a good win in the 2m 2f Cesarewitch, beating Eau Claire (br f Torpoint) by half a length and the favoured Oaks winner Snow Marten (b f 1912 Martagon). In this race of 31 competitors Florist was left standing at the post and Lady Of Asia broke her leg. Starting as favourite he again won the 2m 4f Jockey Club Stakes, beating Lanius (b c 1911 Llangibby) by 4 lengths and Gadabout (b c 1912 St. Denis).

In his only race in 1916 he won the 2m+ Warren Hill Handicap at Newmarket by a neck, beating Chelsho (b c 1911 Simon Square) and Aboukir (b c 1911 St. Amant). He conceded between 11lb and 43lb to the rest of the field. This was his last race.

He retired to the Tickford Park Stud of Donald Fraser for a fee of 98 sovereigns with a full book. In 1923 he returned to the care of Reginald Day at Terrace House and his fee rose to 200gs, and in 1924 to 300gs. His book was full every year to 1930, after which he was not advertised. There was no Gold Cup at Ascot in either 1915 or 1916 due to the war, so Son-In-Law had no chance to add it to his collection, but he sired 3 sons who did, Foxlaw (br c 1922), Bosworth (br c 1926) and Trimdon (b c 1926).
 

Foxlaw (1922)

Bosworth (1926)

Trimdon (1926)
 
Foxlaw was bred by Donald Fraser and won the Jockey Club Stakes and Northumberland Plate in addition to his Gold Cup. And Foxlaw got two Gold Cup winners as well: Foxhunter (ch c 1929) and Tiberius (br c 1931). The French-bred Foxhunter won the Criterion Stakes before export to Argentina where he became a leading sire. Tiberius won the Goodwood Cup to go along with his Ascot victory and in the stud got Szczecin (b c 1946) who won the Derby in Poland and he in turn got a St Leger winner with Dziegiel (ch c 1957). Another son of Foxlaw, Foxbridge (b c 1930), was a half-sister to the 1000 Guineas winner Cresta Run and although he won only 1 race himself went to New Zealand where he led the sires list for 11 consecutive seasons.

Bosworth (br c 1926) was perhaps the most successful in terms of tail-male descendants. He won the Gold Cup and in the stud got the Jockey Club Stakes and Coronation Cup winner Plassy (b c 1932). Plassy got the French-bred Vandale (b c 1943) who became a leading sire in France, and in his turn Vandale sired the Prix Du Jockey Club winner Herbager (b c 1956). Herbager got 3 good sire sons: Grey Dawn (gr c 1962), a popular sire in America; Appiani (b c 1963), a winner of the Derby Italiano and leading sire in Germany who sired the Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe winner Star Appeal (b c 1970), the latter got the Magyar Derby and St Leger winner Try Star (ch c 1983); and Sea Hawk (gr c 1968) who got the Ascot Gold winner Erimo Hawk (gr c 1968).

Trimdon (b c 1926), not to be outdone, won the Gold Cup twice and sired the French-bred Marsyas (ch c 1940) who won the 2m 4f Prix Du Cadran no less than 4 times, along with the Goodwood and Doncaster Cups and the Queen Alexandra Stakes.
 

Beau Père (1927)

Rustom Pasha (1927)

Winalot (1921)
 
Another interesting offspring of Son-In-Law, Beau Père (br c 1927), from the 1000 Guineas and Oaks 2° Cinna, won only 3 races worth £974 before entering the stud. He was poorly patronised at Newmarket and sold to New Zealand where his fortune dramatically improved. He was a leading sire there twice and then moved to Australia where he led their sires list 3 times. Eventually sold to to America for $100,000 he did well there too.

Rustom Pasha (b c 1927) was bred by HH Aga Khan and won the Champion Stakes and the Eclipse Stakes. He went to stud in France where he got Rustom Mahal (gr f 1934), the dam of very speedy Abernant (gr c 1946 Owen Tudor). He was later sent to the Argentine where he was most successful as a stallion.

Winalot (br c 1921) was purchased as a yearling for 1,000 guineas and won the Manchester Cup and Liverpool Summer Cup before he entered the Burton Agnes Stud in Yorkshire. He covered for a fee of 98 sovereigns and got a number of good horses including Coup De Lyon (ch c 1930) who did well in Ireland, and the Cesarewitch winner Enfield (ch c 1931) who did well in Austalia.
 

Lady Juror (1919)
 
Straitlace (1921)
 
Son-In-Law had a number of quite famous daughters, among them Lady Juror (b f 1919) and Straitlace (b f 1921). Lady Juror won the Jockey Club Stakes, then at 4 years was purchased for 8600gs by Lord Dewar, and became ancestress to a host of good winners including the 2000 Guineas winner Tudor Minstrel (br c 1944) and the champion sire Fair Trial (ch c 1932). Straitlace won the Oaks in 1924 and was sold at auction the next year for the record price of 17,000 guineas. Perhaps her most notable descendant is the Irish 1000 Guineas and St Leger winner Pidget (gr f 1969).

Son-In-Law was a champion sire in 1924 and 1930. He outlived his owner by a year and passed away quietly at Terrace House Stud, Newmarket, on May 15, 1941.
   
Bayardo (GB)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred




Alfred William Cox (1857-1919),
made his fortune with the Broken Hill
silver mine in Australia then returned to
England and took up horse racing. He
had little more than a dozen paddocks
at Newmarket and from such mares as
Lady Muncaster bought in 1888 and
Agave in 1889, he bred Bayardo, Lemberg
and Gay Crusader. After his death his horses
went to his brother Algernon E Cox.





Galicia

Bayardo b c 1906 (Bay Ronald - Galicia, by Galopin). Family 10-a.

Bred by Alfred W Cox, who raced under the nom de course of "Mr Fairie," Bayardo was a third generation "homebred" for Mr Cox, as he had purchased Lady Muncaster in 1888 for £1,600 after she had won 8 races and over £3,500. See also Galicia. Bayardo was a half-brother to the Derby winner Lemberg (b c 1907 Cyllene).

His name was said to be derived from the "famous steed" Bayardo who belonged to Amadis Of Gaul and later to Rinaldo, and it meant "bay". Once when Rinaldo was passing passing the three stones near Sleaford, Lincolnshire, which are called Bayaro's or Bayard's Leap, the local demon sprang onto the horse behind him, but Bayardo "in terror took three tremendous leaps and unhorsed the fiend".

Bayardo was a horse with strong opinions and his owner was said to be quite fond of his "funny little ways". Approaching the end of his three year old season he took a dislike to passing in front of the Newmarket stands so he was forevermore taken round the back instead. He also had an aversion to having his ears covered, an eccentricty he shared with his half-brother Eastern.
Bayardo Bay Ronald Hampton Lord Clifden
Lady Langden
Black Duchess Galliard
Black Corrie
Galicia Galopin Vedette
Flying Duchess
Isoletta Isonomy
Lady Muncaster
Trained by Alec Taylor at Manton he won 22 of his 25 races having a value of £44,534. Unbeaten as a two year old, his only losses as a three year old came in the 2000 Guineas and the Derby, both to His Majesty's Minoru (br c 1906 Cyllene), who was, incidentally, a highly popular winner. Various explanations have been put forth for his failures. "Audax" (see Daily Racing Form, Mar 20, 1924) says he was "rapidly recovering from the dental and feet troubles which had affected him". Mortimer and Wilmot (see Great Racehorses Of The World) thought Bayardo simply did not like the cold and the "unseasonably firm" ground which hurt his sensitive feet. Another (see Bloodstock Breeders' Review, Volume VI) notes that at the finish, his jockey Danny Maher was standing up, and in fact reckoned he had lost lengths in the confusion following the fall of the American-bred Sir Martin (ch c 1906 Ogden) on the descent to Tattenham Corner. Bayardo lost only one other race, by only a nose, the Goodwood Cup, which was his final appearance on the turf, due perhaps to the "long grass" or his jockey's misjudgment or the fact that the winner was perfectly prepared. Regardless, Bayardo had proved himself a splendid racehorse.

In 1908 he won the New Stakes at Ascot Heath by a length and a half, beating Perdiccas (ch c 1906 Persimmon) and the future Oaks winner Perola (ch f 1906 Persimmon). Next he won the National Breeders' Produce Stakes at Sandown Park by a length, beating Glasgerion (ch c 1906 Gallinule) and Vivid (br f 1906 St. Frusquin). His next win came in the Richmond Stakes at Goodwood in which he defeated Vivid by 3 lengths and Oakmere (bbr c 1906 Wildfowler). He then won the Buckenham Stakes at Newmarket by three quarters of a length, beating Bonnie Lassie (ch f 1906 Isinglass) and Vivario (b f 1906 Ayrshire). He followed this with a win in the Rous Memorial Stakes at Newmarket, beating his solitary opponent Auceps (b c 1906 Wildfowler) by a length and a half. He also won the Middle Park Plate at Newmarket by a length, beating Vivid and the Gimcrack Stakes winner Blankney (b c 1906 Flying Fox). He capped off a stellar season by winning the Dewhurst Plate at Newmarket by 3 lengths, beating Perola and Specimen (ch c 1906 Persimmon).

In 1909 he finished 4° for the 2000 Guineas, won by Minoru and Phaleron (b c 1906 Gallinule). He was unplaced for the Derby, won by Minoru and Louviers (b c 1906 Isinglass). He made up for his first 2 losses by winning his next 11 races, starting with the 1m 5f Prince Of Wales's Stakes at Ascot Heath by three quarters of a length, beating Cattaro (br g 1906 Carbine) and Verne (bl f 1906 Bill Of Portland). Then came the 1m 2f Sandringham Foal Stakes at Sandown Park, beating Verney (ch c 1906 Veronese) by a length and a half and Oakmere. After this he won the 1m 2f Eclipse Stakes at Sandown Park, beating Royal Realm (b c 1905 Persimmon) by 2 lengths and Santo Strato (b c 1905 Victor Wild or St. Frusquin). He then won the Duchess Of York Plate at Hurst Park, beating Valens (br c 1906 Laveno) by 2 lengths and Perola. He followed this with a win in the 1m 6f+ St Leger Stakes, beating Valens by a length and a half and Mirador (ch c 1906 Marco). Next he won the 1m 4f Doncaster Stakes, beating Verney by a length and Great Peter (b c 1906 Pietermaritzburg). Then he won the 1m 2f Champion Stakes at Newmarket by a neck, beating Dean Swift (ch g 1901 Childwick) and White Eagle (ch c 1905 Gallinule). He followed this with a win in the 1m 6f Lowther Stakes at Newmarket, beating White Eagle by a length and a half with White Eagle giving him 12lb and the Ebor Handicap winner Rousay (b c 1904 Bay Ronald). Next he won the 1m 2f Sandown Foal Stakes by a length, beating Shikaree (ch c 1906 Wildfowler) who was receiving 26lb and Legatee (bl c 1906 Dinna Forget). He then won the 1m 2f Limekiln Stakes at Newmarket, beating his only opponent Perseus (ch c 1906 Persimmon) by 15 lengths whilst giving him 14lb. In his final race of the year he won the 1m 4f Liverpool St Leger, beating his solitary opponent King Amyntas (b c 1906 Right-Away) by half a length giving him 24lb.

In 1910 he first won the 1m 4f Newmarket Biennial Stakes by three quarters of a length, beating Great Peter and Cattaro giving them each 14lb. He next won the 1m 4f Chester Vase, beating William The Fourth (ch c 1906 William The Third) by a head and Malpas (bbr c 1907 Mauvezin) who was getting 38lb. He followed this with a win for the 2m 4f Gold Cup at Ascot Heath by 4 lengths, beating the Prix Du Jockey Club winner Sea Sick (b c 1905 Elf) and Bachelor's Double (ch c 1906 Tredennis). After this he won the 1m 4f Dullingham Plate at Newmarket by a length, beating The Spaniard (b c 1907 St. Simon) who was getting 38lb and Royal Realm who was getting 7lb. In his final race he finished 2° for the 2m 4f Goodwood Cup by just a nose, won by Magic (ch c 1907 Martagon) who was getting 36lb and beating Bud (gr f 1907 William The Third) who was getting 34lb.

He retired to the Manton House Stud at Marlborough, Wiltshire, with a full book for a fee of 300 guineas, which was reduced for the war by 100 guineas. He sired two triple crown winners, Gay Crusader (b c 1914) and Gainsborough (b c 1915), a seemingly daunting task for any stallion yet Isonomy accomplished it with Common (br c 1888) and Isinglass (b c 1890) as well. Bayardo also got a number of sons who will be mostly remembered in their adoptive countries, including Lord Basil (br c 1916) in Argentina, the St James's Palace Stakes winner Allenby (b c 1917) in Ireland, Manton (b c 1917) in Poland where he got the Rulera winner Wagram, and The Ace (br c 1918) in New Zealand where he in turn got the Auckland and New Zealand Cups winner Fast Passage.

He also sired some good fillies, among them Good And Gay (b f 1912), the dam of 1000 Guineas and Oaks winner Saucy Sue (br f 1922 Swynford) and her full brother Swift And Sure (b c 1923) who won the Chester Vase. Bayuda (b f 1916) won the Cheveley Park Stakes and the Oaks, and was the ancestress of the stallion Sharpen Up (ch c 1969 Atan). Rothesay Bay (b f 1916) won the Great Yorkshire Handicap and was ancestress of Coronation Cup winner Plassy (b c 1932 Bosworth). Scuola D'Atene (b f 1917) was ancestress to several good winners in Italy and to Turysta (br c 1944 Bellini) who was a first-class stallion in Poland.

Bayardo was Champion sire in 1917 and 1918, largely due to the efforts of Gay Crusader and Gainsborough, and a Champion broodmare sire 1925 with thanks to Saucy Sue. He died on June 4, 1917, at the age of 11, from what was called a thrombosis which caused a paralysis of the quarters.
   
Gay Crusader (GB)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred





Galéottia

Gay Crusader b c 1914 (Bayardo - Gay Laura, by Beppo). Family 1-g.

Bred by Alfred Cox, he was full brother to the Coronation Cup winner Manilardo (b c 1916 Bayardo). His dam, Gay Laura (br f 1909) had won 1 race and bred 5 winners. Cox had purchased Agave (bbr f 1884) from Mr Houldsworth in 1889 and from her bred Galéottia (b f 1892) the 1000 Guineas winner.
Gay Crusader Bayardo Bay Ronald Hampton
Black Duchess
Galicia Galopin
Isoletta
Gay Laura Beppo Marco
Pitti
Galéottia Galopin
Agave
Trained by Alec Taylor at Manton House, he ran for 2 years in 10 races, winning 8 of them and earning £11,246. His two year old debut was much deferred by sore shins and he didn't see a race course until late in the year. After his first race as a three year old he won the rest of them, becoming the first triple crown winner since Pommern (b c 1912 Polymelus) two years earlier. His stable companion, Major Astor's Magpie (bl c 1914 Dark Ronald), ran him to a head in the 2000 Guineas, but was sold to Australia before the Derby. As a four year old Mr Cox wished him to have another try at the Ascot Gold Cup but before the race he developed tendon trouble and never ran again. Although his opposition had been fairly limited due to the war his jockey, Steve Donoghue, many times a champion himself, maintained that Gay Crusader was the best horse he ever rode.

In 1916 he was unplaced for the Clearwell Stakes at Newmarket, won by Coq D'Or (br g 1914 Fowling-Piece) and the July Stakes winner Grand Fleet (b c 1914 Bachelor's Double). He won his only other start this year, the Criterion Stakes at Newmarket, beating the Cheveley Park Stakes winner Molly Desmond (b f 1914 Desmond) and Grand Fleet.

In 1917 he finished 2° for the 1m Column Produce Stakes at Newmarket, won by Coq D'Or and beating Aleli (ch c 1914 Minoru). He then won the 2000 Guineas by a head, beating Magpie and Athdara (br c 1914 Desmond). He followed this with a win in the Derby by 4 lengths, beating Dansellon (br c 1914 Chaucer) and Dark Legend (bbr c 1914 Dark Ronald). Next he had a 6 length win in the 1m 6f September Stakes at Newmarket (the wartime substitute for the St Leger Stakes at Doncaster), beating his only 2 opponents, Kingston Black (br c 1914 Royal Realm) and Dansellon. He then won the 2m 4f Newmarket Gold Cup (wartime substitute for the Ascot Gold Cup) by 15 lengths, again beating only 2 opponents, Ferox (b c 1913 Willonyx) and Kingston Black. His next win came in the 1m 2f  Champion Stakes, when he defeated Bosket (bbr c 1913 Amadis) by 6 lengths and the Princess Of Wales's Stakes winner Nassovian (b c 1913 William The Third). He also won the 1m 6f Lowther Stakes, beating his solitary opponent Dansellon by 4 lengths. In his final race of the year he won the 1m 2f Limekiln Stakes, beating his only rival Quarryman (ch c 1914 Prospector) by a length and a half.
 

Caissot (1923)

Kincardine (1924)

Hot Night (1924)
 
He retired to the Manton House Stud at a fee of 400 guineas and a full book through 1930. Following the death of Mr Fairie his brother Algernon refused an offer of £100,000 for Gay Crusader from J B Joel. Like his brother before him, Algernon did not sell his horses. Gay Crusader was well patronised by English supporters but the mark his sons made was far from home. Among them were
(1) Bright Knight (b c 1921) who was sent to America and got a number of winners there, including the Beeders' Futurity winner Gallant Knight (br c 1927).
(2) Caissot (ch c 1923), son of the St Leger winner Keysoe, won the Prince Of Wales's Stakes before he was sent to Hungary in 1928 and was there a top-class leading sire for many years.
(3) Kincardine (b c 1924) won both the St James's Palace Stakes and the Jersey Stakes before export to New Zealand where he was a valuable sire, getting, among others, the New Zealand Derby winner Kindergarten (b c 1937).
(4) Hot Night (b c 1924) finished 2° for both the Derby (won by Call Boy) and the St Leger (won by Book Law). In the stud he got the dam of the Cambridgeshire winner Fleeting Moment (ch c 1946 Signal Light), Carissa (ch f 1934) who won the Portland Handicap, and Mulligatawny (ch f 1936) the ancestress of Jimmy Reppin (ch c 1965 Midsummer Night). Jimmy Reppin won the Celebration Mile, the Sussex Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes during his career on the turf. He was later exported to Sweden and left many top Scandinavian-bred winners behind there. Hot Night was later sent to India.

The daughters of Gay Crusader were probably more famous.
(1) Indolence (b f 1920) was the dam of Prince Rose (b c 1928 Rose Prince) who won the Grand Prix De Saint-Cloud and led the sires list in both France and Belgium. Prince Rose sired the top American stallion Princequillo (b c 1940) and the top French stallions Prince Bio (b c 1941) and Prince Chevalier (b c 1943).
(2) Hellespont (gr f 1921) was the grandam of the Derby and St Leger winner Airborne (gr c 1943 Precipitation).
(3) Loika (ch f 1926) became the dam of Djebel (b c 1937 Tourbillon), winner of the 2000 Guineas, the Poule D'Essai Des Poulains and the Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe and twice leading sire in France. Another son Phidias (br c 1941 Pharis) won the Prix du Jockey Club and the Grand Prix De Paris before embarking on a stud career that saw him leading sire in 1944.

Later in life Gay Crusader had become nearly blind and he was destroyed September 14, 1932 at the Manton House Stud at the age of eighteen years.
   
Gainsborough (GB)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred





Lady James Douglas (1915-1945),
purchased Harwood in 1910 on the
advice of John Porter. She bred the
Oaks winners Bayuda and Rose Of England
as well as Gainsborough. She sold Harwood
to Mr Blagrave with the proviso that
Gainsborough remain there for the rest
of his life.




Gainsborough b c 1915 (Bayardo - Rosedrop, by St. Frusquin). Family 2-n.

Bred by Lady James Douglas, Gainsborough, named after a town in Lincolnshire, was the son of the Oaks winner Rosedrop (ch f 1907) and his half-sister the American-bred Rosern (ch f 1927 Mad Hatter) was the dam of the stallion Sunglow (ch c 1947 Sun Again), who in turn got the Belmont Stakes winner Sword Dancer (ch c 1956).

Rosaline, his grandam, was sired by the New Zealand-bred Trenton who was brought to England as a fifteen year old after a successful career on the turf, having won 8 of his 13 races, and an equally successful career in the stud, his stock having won 404 races worth £101,933.

Said to be "an individual of almost faultless conformation and most charming temperament," Gainsborough was offered for sale as a yearling but was passed over on his reserve of 2,000 guineas. He turned out to be, as happens every now and then, both an exceptional racehorse and a exceptional stallion.
Gainsborough Bayardo Bay Ronald Hampton
Black Duchess
Galicia Galopin
Isoletta
Rosedrop St. Frusquin St. Simon
Isabel
Rosaline Trenton
Rosalys
He was first trained by Colledge Leader, who went off to war, so he was sent to Alec Taylor at Manton. He ran only for 2 years mostly in wartime substitutes, however his victories amounted to a wartime "triple crown". He started 9 times and won 5 of these, earning the aforementioned wartime value of £14,080.

In 1917 he finished 4° for the Thurlow Plate at Newmarket, won by Giant Killer (b c 1915 Polymelus) and Merovingian (b c 1915 St. Amant). In his next outing he finished 3° for the Ramsey Plate at Newmarket, won by Violinist (ch c 1915 Neil Gow) and Scatwell (ch c 1915 Marcovil). He followed this with a 2 length win in the Autumn Stakes, beating Freesia (ch f 1915 Lochryan) and Roideur (ch c Roi Hérode).

In 1918 he was unplaced for the Several Stakes, won by Syndrian (b c 1915 Sunder) and Soap Bubble (br c 1915 Picton). He then won the 2000 Guineas by a length and a half, beating Somme Kiss (ch c 1915 Sunstar) and the Princess Of Wales's Stakes winner Blink (br c 1915 Sunstar). Starting favourite for the Derby, he beat Blink by a length and a half, and Treclare (ch c 1915 Tredennis). Favoured again, he won the Newmarket Gold Cup (wartime substitute for the Ascot Gold Cup), beating his only 2 opponents, Planet (b c 1914 St. Frusquin) by half a length and Dansellon (br c 1914 Chaucer). Next he won the September Stakes by 3 lengths (wartime substitute for the St Leger), beating the Oaks winner My Dear (b f 1915 Beppo) by 3 lengths and Prince Chimay (ch c 1915 Chaucer). In his last outing he finished 2° for the 1m 6f Jockey Club Stakes, won by Prince Chimay, beating the Goodwood Cup winner Queen's Square (b f 1915 Chaucer).

He was rested as a four year old and entered his owner's stud in 1920. His colts were generally thought to be better than his fillies. His two outstanding colts were Solario (b c 1922) and Hyperion (ch c 1930). Others included the St Leger winner Singapore (b c 1927, the French-bred Champion Stakes winner Goyescas (b c 1928) and the 2000 Guineas winner Orwell (b c 1929) who was later a champion sire in Ireland.
 

Singapore (1927)

Orwell (1929)
 
 
Among his daughters Gainsborough Lass (b f 1934) was perhaps the most successful, winning the Coronation Stakes. As broodmares his daughters fared much better. Una Cameron (b f 1922) was the dam of the 2000 Guineas and Derby winner Cameronian (b c 1928 Pahros). Imagery (b f 1923) was the dam of the Irish triple crown winner Museum (b c 1932 Legatee) and the Irish 2000 Guineas and Irish Derby winner Phideas (b c 1934 Pharos). And Mah Mahal (gr f 1928) was the dam of the Derby winner and leading sire in America Mahmoud (gr c 1933 Blenheim).

Gainsborough was Champion sire 1932 and 1933 and Champion broodmare sire 1931. He died at the Harwood Stud on June 5, 1945, at the age of thirty.
   
Solario (IRE)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred





Windham Thomas Wyndham-Quin
(1841-1926), 4th Earl Of Dunraven
And Mountearl was a turf compatriot
of Lord Randolph Churchill, who died
in 1895. One of their first purchases was
L'Abbesse De Jouarre in 1887, dam of the
famous Festa and her half-brother Desmond.
He had property in Ireland and Glamorganshire, including the Fort Union Stud at Adare where
Double Hackle was foaled.

Solario b c 1922 (Gainsborough - Sun Worship, by Sundridge). Family 26.

Bred by the 4th Earl Of Dunraven, Solario was a full brother to Imagery (b f 1923), the dam of the Irish triple crown winner Museum (b c 1932 Legatee) and the Irish 2000 guineas and Derby winner Phideas (b c 1934 Pharos). He was purchased by Sir John Rutherford at the Doncaster yearling sales in 1923 for 3,500 guineas.
Solario Gainsborough Bayardo Bay Ronald
Galicia
Rosedrop St. Frusquin
Rosaline
Sun Worship Sundridge Amphion
Sierra
Doctrine Ayrshire
Axiom
Trained by Reg Day he ran for 3 years winning 6 races of 12 and earning £20,935. He had major wins in the 1925 St Leger Stakes and Princess Of Wales's Stakes, and in the 1926 Ascot Gold Cup and Coronation Cup.

In 1924, running unnamed, he finished 3° for the Chesham Stakes at Ascot Heath, won by Poor Scats (b g 1922 Rochester) and J B Joel's (unnamed b g 1922 Sunstar). He then won the Exeter Stakes at Newmarket by a head, beating Chang-Chia (br c 1922 Santoi) and Skysignal (ch c 1922 Sky-Rocket). Now named Solario, in his final outing of the year he finished 2° by a length and a half for the Middle Park Stakes, won by Picaroon (br c 1922 Beppo), beating the future 2000 Guineas and Derby winner Manna (b c 1922 Phalaris) by a neck.

In 1925 he finished 3° for the 1m Craven Stakes at Newmarket, won by Picaroon and the Newmarket Stakes winner Cross Bow (br c 1922 Gay Crusader). Then he finished 4° for the 1m 2000 Guineas, won by Manna, St. Becan (br c 1922 Hurry On) and Oojah (ch c 1922 Bachelor's Double). He also finished 4° for the 1m 4f Derby Stakes at Epsom, won by Manna, the Irish Derby winner Zionist (b c 1922 Spearmint) and The Sirdar (br c 1922 McKinley). He then won the 1m 4f Ascot Derby by a length and a half, beating the Greenham Stakes winner Sparus (b c 1922 Gainsborough) and Manna. He followed this with a win in the 1m 4f Princess Of Wales's Stakes at Newmarket, beating the Northumberland Plate winner Obliterate (br c 1921 Tracery) by a length and half, and the Coronation Cup winner St. Germans (b c 1921 Swynford). Starting co-favourite with Manna he also won the St Leger at Doncaster by 3 lengths, beating the St James's Palace Stakes winner Zambo (bbr c 1922 Sunstar), the future Champion Stakes winner Warden Of The Marches (ch c 1922 Phalaris) and Picaroon.

In 1926 he won the 1m 4f Coronation Cup at Epsom by 15 lengths, beating Zambo and the Prince Of Wales's Stakes winner Warminster (ch c 1922 Louvois). Starting favourite he followed this with a 3 length win in the Ascot Gold Cup, beating the Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe winner Priori (b c 1922 Bruleur) and the Ebor Handicap winner Pons Asinorum (br c 1922 Tredennis). In his final start, also as favourite, he was disqualified after passing the post in 2° place for the 1m 6f Jockey Club Stakes at Newmarket, won by Foxlaw (br c 1922 Son-In-Law) and Hardwicke Stakes winner Foliation (ch f 1923 Tracery).

In 1927 he retired to the Terrace House Stud of Reg Day at Newmarket, along side Son-In-Law, for a fee of 500 guineas with a full book. After the death of Sir John Rutherford in 1932 he was sold to a syndicate, whose principal members were Lords Derby and Glanely, for 47,000 guineas, at that time the highest figure ever given for a stallion at auction.

Some of his memorable sons include Dastur (b c 1929), "a horse of fine quality and conformation," bred and raced by HH Aga Khan, won 7 races with a value of £11,626, including the Irish Derby, the 1933 Champion Stakes (D-H with Oaks winner Chatelaine) and the Coronation Cup. He finished 2° for the 2000 Guineas to Orwell, 2° for the Derby to April The Fifth, 2° for the St Leger to Firdaussi, and 2° for the 1932 Champion Stakes to Cameronian. In the St Leger the Aga Khan's 4 runners finished in the top 5 places. Dastur covered first at the Egerton Stud, Newmarket, then at the Barton Stud near Bury St. Edmonds and from 1940 at the Old Connell Stud in county Kildare. His fee was reduced during the war but went as high as 250 guineas in 1945. His offspring included the Dewhurst Stakes and Ascot Gold Cup winner Umiddad (b c 1940), Dhoti (ch c 1936) who was highly successful in the stud Australia, Gold Nib (b c 1939) who was equally as successful in New Zealand, and Darbhanga (br c 1942) a leading sire in Sweden. He also got numerous daughters who performed well in the stud. Dastur was champion sire Ireland in 1943 and died at Newbridge in 1952.
 

Dastur (1929)

Mid-Day Sun (1934)

Straight Deal (1940)
 
Sind (b c 1933), also bred by HH Aga Khan, ran 7 times and won 2 races worth £3,366, including the St George Stakes by 2 lengths and the Atlantic Cup by 3 lengths, both at Liverpool. He also finished 2° for the Prince Of Wales's Stakes at Ascot and 3° for the Ormonde stakes at Chester, the latter won by Obliterate. In France he finished 2° for the Grand Prix De Paris to Mieuxcé. In 1937 he went to stud in France. He got Pierot (b c 1939) a stallion in Czechoslovakia, Sans Tares (ch f 1939), the dam of the Washington DC International winner Worden (ch c 1949 Wild Risk) who was a leading broodmare sire in England in 1975 and 1976, and Mirabelle (b f 1940) ancestress of 2000 Guineas winner Nebbiolo (ch c 1974 Yellow God). He was sent to Argentina and was a leading sire there in 1950.

Mid-Day Sun (br c 1934) was purchased privately  as a yearling for 2,000 guineas after he had failed to reach his reserve at the Newmarket First October Sales. As a two year old he won only once, the Ditch Mile Nursery at Newmarket, from 8 starts. He did much better as a three year old, finishing 3°in the 2000 Guineas to Le Ksar and Goya, and winning both the Derby Trial Stakes at Lingfield and the Derby itself, beating Sandsprite and Le Grand Duc. He then won the Hardwicke Stakes at Ascot and the Manton Stakes at Salisbury before starting favourite for the St Leger in which he finished 3° to Chulmleigh and Fair Copy. Although he was kept in training as a four year old he did not race again due to his dislike for hard ground. He earned £15,748. He retired to the Wyck Hall Stud at Newmarket for a fee of 300 guineas and moved after the war to Upend Stud. His fee was reduced for the war to 199 sovereigns and later to half that. He had very few opportunities during the war, was not favoured after, and was sold in 1950 to Sir James and Mr C T Fletcher of the Alton Lodge Stud in New Zealand where he died in 1954. His best earner was Cambridgeshire winner (twice) Sterope (b c 1945). He also got Alonzo (br c 1943), sire in New Zealand of the Melbourne and Caulfield Cups winner Rising Fast (b g 1949).

Straight Deal (b c 1940), a "stong, well-made individual," standing 15.2+ with a girth of 71 inches, was bred and owned by the Hon Dorothy Wyndham Paget. As a two year old he won 2 races and finished 2° to Nasrullah for the Coventry Stakes and 2° to Umiddad for the Dewhurst Stakes. As a three year old he went unplaced for the 2000 Guineas, won the Derby, beating Umiddad and Nasrullah, won the Upper Sixpenny Stakes and White Waltham Stakes and placed 3° for the St Leger won by the 1000 Guineas winner Herringbone and the Middle Park Stakes winner Ribbon. He retired to the Benham Stud, near Newbury, for a fee of £248 which later rose to £348 and then dropped to £98. In 1953 he moved to his owner's Ballymacoll Stud Farm at Dunboyne, County Meath, and then to the Balfstown Stud in County Dublin. He was well patronised for nearly a decade although later in life he was popular as a jumper sire. He did not get any superlative sons but his daughters are well known. Double Deal (b f 1946) was the dam of Silly Season (br c 1962 Tom Fool); Above Board (b f 1947) herself the winner of the Cesarewitch and the dam of Doutelle (ch c 1954 Prince Chevalier) and Above Suspicion (b c 1956 Court Martial); Capital Issue (b f 1947) the dam of the Irish 2000 Guineas winner Kythnos (b c 1957 Nearula); Ark Royal (b f 1952) winner of the Yorkshire Oaks and the dam of the Coronation Stakes winner Ocean (br f 1961 Petition) and Hermes (b c 1963 Aureole). Straight Deal was leading sire in 1956/57 under National Hunt Rules and died in 1968.

Solario got numerous good fillies, such as
(1) Serial (gr f 1932) the dam of Ballyogan (ch c 1939 Fair Trial),
(2) Traffic Light (b f 1933) the winner of the Coronation and Park Hill Stakes and ancestress of the Oaks winner Ambiguity (b f 1950 Big Game) and the Irish Derby and St Leger Stakes winner Sodium (b c 1963 Psidium),
(3) Exhibitionnist (b f 1934) who won the 1000 Guineas and Oaks,
(4) Stafaralla (b f 1935) winner of the Park Hill Stakes and dam of the St Leger winner Tehran (b c 1941 Bois Roussel),
(5) Solar Flower (br f 1935) winner of the Coronation Stakes and dam of Champion Stakes winner and Irish champion stallion Solar Slipper (b c 1945 Windsor Slipper) as well as grandam of Derby winner and champion broodmare sire Arctic Prince (br c 1948 Prince Chevalier) to name just a few.

Solario was Champion sire in Ireland in 1936, in England in 1937 and Champion broodmare sire in England in 1943, 1949 and 1950. He died about 3 months before his sire on March 15, 1945.
 
Hyperion (GB)
   
   

Photograph by W A Rouch
© Thoroughbred




Selene

Hyperion ch c 1930 (Gainsborough - Selene, by Chaucer). Family 6-e.

Bred by the 17th Earl Of Derby he was half-brother to Sickle (br c 1924 Phalaris), Pharamond (br c 1925) and Hunter's Moon (b c 1926 Hurry On), the first two famous in America and the latter in Argentina. His dam, the petite Selene (b f 1919), won 16 races (one of these a dead-heat) of 22 herself and earned £14,651. She won from 1m 2f to 1m 6f+ and by all accounts was a tough genuine race mare. In the stud she did even better and foaled 10 winners of 30 races with a value of £47,345.

Said to be the smallest horse to win the Derby since Little Wonder 93 years earlier, Hyperion measured half an inch over 15.1 hands and 68 inches around the girth. His lack of height was attributed to a number of possible factors including short cannon bones, the generally smaller size of horses in this line from Touchstone on down and the fact that Selene was small and so was her sire Chaucer.

The female line of Hyperion spent 4 generations in France. William Blenkiron purchased his 6° dam Fenella (ch f 1869) from Comte De Lagrange. He bred a number of foals from her, including Douranee (b f 1877), and in 1878 sold Fenella to Austria-Hungary. Douranee won 11 races for the Duke Of Westminster and he repatriated Fenella from Austria. He eventually sold her to Argentina along with Ormonde (b c 1883 Bend Or). But luckily he kept Douranee, from whom he bred Dongola (b f 1883), the dam of Gondolette (b f 1902). Gondolette, the dam of Great Sport (b c 1910) and Let Fly (b c 1912) for Lord Wavertree, was purchased by Lord Derby for 1550 guineas carrying Serenissima (b f 1913) at the December Sales of 1912. Gondolette also got the Derby winner Sansovino (b c 1921). Besides Selene, Serenissima produced the Ascot Gold Cup winner Bosworth.

Hyperion was considered to be a great character and said to be interested in bird watching. While in Yorkshire during the war he would observe the pheasants in his paddock and when a sufficient number had gathered he would gallop over and frighten them all away (see Hyperion, by Clive Graham).
Hyperion Gainsborough Bayardo Bay Ronald
Galicia
Rosedrop St. Frusquin
Rosaline
Selene Chaucer St. Simon
Canterbury Pilgrim
Serenissima Minoru
Gondolette
Never a tall horse, Hyperion was considered small enough to be held back from training with the other yearlings, but George Lambton liked him sufficiently to give him a chance. Lambton had also trained both Selene and Chaucer. After Lambton retired at the end of the 1933 season he was trained by Colledge Leader, who became private trainer to Lord Derby at Stanley House. He ran for 3 years winning 9 races of 13 and earning £29,509. He was not entered for the 2000 Guineas. Officially he won the Derby by 4 lengths, however, in a photograph of the finish the winning margin appears to be more.

In 1932 he was unplaced for the Zetland Maiden Plate at Doncaster, won by Aidetta (b f 1930 Phalaris) and Hello Peggy (ch f 1930 Grand Parade). He then won the New Stakes at Ascot Heath by 3 lengths, beating Nun's Veil (br f 1930 Friar Marcus), Outrider (ch c 1930 Hurry On) and 19 others. Next he ran a dead-heat with Stairway (b f 1930 Sansovino) for the Prince Of Wales's Stakes at Goodwood, beating Haystack (br c 1930 Papyrus). Then he finished 3° for the Boscawen (Post) Stakes at Newmarket, won by Manitoba (b c 1930 Manna) and Tavern (b c 1930 Papyrus), beating Moti Begum (gr f 1930 Gainsborough). In his last race of the year he won the Dewhurst Stakes at Newmarket by 2 lengths, beating Jesmond Dene (br c 1930 Gainsborough) and Lochiel (b c 1930 Coronach).

In 1933 as favourite he won all 4 of his races, starting with the 1m 4f Chester Vase by 2 lengths, beating Shamsuddin (br c 1930 Solario) and Franz Hals (ch g 1930 Gainsborough). He followed this with a win in the 1m 4f Derby by 4 lengths, beating King Salmon (b c 1930 Salmon-Trout) and Statesman (br c 1930 Blandford). Then he won the 1m 5f Prince Of Wales's Stakes at Ascot Heath by 2 lengths, beating Shamsuddin and Belfry (b c 1930 Solario). His final win came in the 1m 6f+ St Leger by 3 lengths, beating the Middle Park Stakes winner Felicitation (b c 1930 Colorado) and Scarlet Tiger (b c 1930 Colorado).

In 1934 he won the 1m 2f March Stakes at Newmarket by a neck, beating Angelico (b c 1930 Solario) and Felicitation. He next won the 1m 4f Burwell Stakes at Newmarket by three  quarters of a length, beating King Salmon and Harinero (b c 1930 Blandford). Then he finished 3° for the 2m 4f Gold Cup at Ascot, won by Felicitation (by 8 lengths) and the Prix Du Jockey Club winner Thor (b c 1930 Ksar). In his final race he lost the 1m 4f Dullingham Stakes at Newmarket by a "short head" to his only opponent Caithness (ch c 1931 Coronach).

He retired to Lord Derby's Woodland Stud at Newmarket with a full book. During the war years he spent summers at the Thornton Stud in Yorkshire and for 3 years he covered at the Plantation Stud at Newmarket. His fillies were generally considered more successful on the racecourse than his colts, nevertheless his sons made a name for themselves all over the world.
 

Heliopolis (1936)

Alibhai (1938)

Owen Tudor (1938)
 
Heliopolis (b c 1936) was a full brother to the 1000 Guineas and Oaks winner Sun Stream (ch f 942) and a half-brother to the 1000 Guineas winner Tide-Way (br f 1933 Fairway). He won the Imperial Produce Stakes at Kempton Park, the Prince Of Wales's Stakes at Ascot Heath, the Princess Of Wales's Stakes at Newmarket, and the Chester Vase before his purchase by C B Shaffer for a reputed $20,000 and export to America. He covered at his owner's Coldstream Stud near Lexington, Kentucky. Among his offspring were 4 champion fillies, including the Demoiselle Stakes winner Aunt Jinny (ch f 1948), the CCA Oaks winner Grecian Queen (bbr f 1950), the Alabama Stakes winner Parlo (ch f 1951), and the CCA Oaks winner Berlo (br f 1957). Heliopolis also sired a number of good colts, such as the Belmont Stakes winner High Gun (br c 1951) but his best stallion son was the Wood Memorial winner Olympia (b c 1946). In 1951 Heliopolis was sold to Henry Knight and moved to his Almahurst Farm near Nicholasville where he died in 1959.

Alibhai (ch c 1938) was bred in the Sheshoon Stud by HH Aga Khan and was a half-brother to the Irish Oaks winner Theresina (ch f 1927 Diophon). He was sold as a yearling at Newmarket to Louis B Meyer for $13,440. He never ran, having broken both front sesamoids in training. He established himself well enough as a stallion that in 1948 he was purchased for a record price of $500,000 by a syndicate headed by Leslsie Combs II. Some of his more notable offspring include Kentucky Derby winner Determine (gr c 1951), Flower Bowl (b f 1952), the dam of Graustark (ch c 1963 Ribot), and Metropolitan Handicap winner Traffic Judge (ch c 1952). The latter got Traffic Cop who in turn got the Preakness winner Deputed Testamony (b c 1980). Alibhai died in his stall at Spendthrift Farm on June 9, 1960, having suffered a heart attack.

Owen Tudor (br c 1938), full-brother to Chester Vase winner Edward Tudor (ch c 1943), was bred by the Hon Mrs R Macdonald-Buchanan from the French-bred Mary Tudor II, a winner of the Poule D'Essai Des Pouliches and 2° for the Prix De Diane. Her father, Lord Woolavington, had purchased the high-class filly shortly before he died. Owen Tudor won the Derby and the Ascot Gold Cup. He ran 13 times, won 6, and earned £7,670 (wartime) from 5 furlongs to 2 miles 2 furlongs. He retired to the New England Stud at a fee of 250gs but moved in 1945 to the Egerton Stud at Newmarket where his fee rose to 300gs. Two of his best earners were the very fast Middle Park Stakes winner Abernant (gr c 1946), and the Prix Du Jockey Club and Poule D'Essai Des Poulains winner Right Royal V (br c 1958). His best stallion son was probably Tudor Minstrel (br c 1944) who won the 2000 Guineas and his grandson Kashmir (br c 1963 Tudor Melody) won the same race in 1966. Tudor Minstrel was later exported to America and also did well there. Owen Tudor died near the end of March in 1966 at the Egerton Stud.
 

Aureole (1950)
 
Hypericum (1943)
 
Aureole (ch c 1950), Hyperion's best earner, raced by HM the Queen, won the King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and the Coronation Cup earning £36,225 and was later champion sire in England in 1960 and 1961. In the stud he got the Derby and St Leger winner St. Paddy (b c 1957) and the Prix De L'Arc De Triomphe winner Saint Cespin (ch c 1956).

Sons of Hyperion did sterling duty in Argentina. Selim Hassan (b c 1938) was leading sire in 1951 and 1952 getting, among others, the Argentine derby winner Yatasto (br c 1948). Gulf Stream (b c 1943) was a leading sire in 1955, 1958 and 1959 and among his offspring were the Derby winners Manantial (br c 1955) and Mamboreta (b c 1956). Aristophanes (ch c 1948), leading sire in 1960, got the Derby and 2000 Guineas equivalent Forli (ch c 1963) who went to America and was a great success in the stud there.
 

Khaled (1943)
 
Hornbeam (1953)
 
In fact sons of Hyperion went nearly everywhere and stamped their excellence wherever they went - Stardust (ch c 1937) in Ireland whose son Star Kingdom (ch c 1946) went to Australia; Helios (b c 1937) in Australia too and leading sire in 1949; Deimos (bc 1940) in South Africa; Ruthless (b c 1941) in New Zealand; Khaled (b c 1943) in America where he got the Kentucky Derby winner Swaps (ch c 1952); Aldis Lamp (ch c 1943) a perennial leading sire in Belgium; Sky High (b c 1943) a Chester Vase winner and well regarded stallion in France; Hyperbole (b c 1945) a champion sire in Ireland and later in Sweden; Hornbeam (ch c 1953) champion broodmare sire in England and later a high-class stallion in Sweden as well.

Daughters of Hyperion were spectacular on the racecourse: (1)Godiva (b f 1937) won the 1000 guineas and Oaks, (2) Sun Chariot (br f 1939) won the 1000 Guineas, Oaks and St Leger, (3) Hycilla (ch f 1941) won the Oaks and Champion Stakes, (4) Sun Stream (ch f 1942) won the 1000 Guineas and Oaks and (5) Hypericum (b f 1943) won the Dewhurst Stakes 1000 Guineas and was ancestress of the champion three year old colt Unfuwain (b c 1985 Northern Dancer), the 2000 Guineas and Derby winner Nashwan (ch c 1986 Blushing Groom) and the champion three year old colt Nayef (b c 1998 Gulch).

The daughters were just as good in the breeding shed: (1) Aurora (ch f 1936) dam of Ascot Gold Cup winner and champion sire Alycidon (ch c 1945 Donatello), (2) Helia (ch f 1937) dam of Ascot Gold Cup winner Supertello (ch c 1946 Donatello); (3) Hydroplane (ch f 1938) dam of American triple crown winner Citation (b c 1945 Bull Lea); (4) Lightning (b f 1950) dam of Derby winner Parthia (b c 1956 Persian Gulf); and (5) Neutron (ch f 1948) dam of Court Harwell (br c 1954 Prince Chevalier) a champion sire in 3 countries, England, Ireland and Argentina.

Hyperion was champion sire in England in 1940, 1941, 1942, 1945, and 1946 and champion broodmare sire 1948, 1954 1957, 1967, and 1968.

Lord Derby told the press that Hyperion had contracted laminitis at the beginning of the winter and a special shelter was built for him in his paddock. However, his circulation began to fail after a cold snap, and his time ran out on December 9, 1960 at the Woodland Stud.
   
Petrarch (GB)
   
   

Petrarch

Petrarch (GB) b c 1873 (Lord Clifden - Laura, by Orlando). Family 10.

Bred at the Hollist Stud Farm, near Midhurst, Sussex, by J W Gosden, who raced under the nom-de-course "Mr Spencer," Petrarch was from Laura, who was half sister to the Oaks winner Tormentor (b f 1863 King Tom). Laura also produced Proto-Martyr (ch c 1869 St. Albans) who went to Australia, Rotherhill (b c 1872), a full brother to Petrarch, who went to America and Laureate (br c 1879 Rosicrucian) who did likewise.

On the advice of John Dawson (brother of Mathew) Petrarch was purchased by George Robert Hay-Drummond (1849-1866), Viscount Dupplin, for £10,000 after he had beaten Dupplin's Kaleidoscope in the Middle Park Plate. He was sold after his St Leger victory to the 4th Lord Lonsdale, and again to the 5th Baron Calthorpe after he won the Rous Memorial Stakes for a reputed 5,000 guineas.

Sydenham Dixon ("Vigilant") wrote of Petrarch that he "possessed more elegance and quality than almost any racehorse that I can call to mind".
Petrarch Lord Clifden Newminster Touchstone
Beeswing
The Slave Melbourne
Volley
Laura Orlando Touchstone
Vulture
Torment Alarm
Glencoe Mare
Petrarch was initially trained by William Goater at Michel Grove, however, following his purchase by Lord Dupplin he was under the care of John Dawson at Warren House, Prince Batthyany's private stable at Newmarket. He ran for 4 years, starting 16 times and winning 8 races worth £18,260. After he lost the Derby there was much discussion of his erratic form which was later attributed to a kidney ailment and perhaps to a lack of stamina, however since he subsequently won both St Leger and Ascot Gold Cup there can have been little substance to the latter.

In 1875 he won his only race of the year, the Middle Park Plate, by 4 lengths, beating Madeira (ch f 1873 Thunderbolt) and the French-bred Heurtebise (ch f 1873 Honesty or Optimist). Also among the 27 other starters were the Buccaneer-Mineral Colt (b c 1873) who was later named Kisbér, the favoured French-bred Lollypop (ch c 1873 Souvenir) and Kaleidoscope (b c 1873 Speculum).

In 1876, running for Lord Dupplin, he won the Two Thousand Guineas by 3 lengths, beating Julius Caesar (b c 1873 St. Albans) and the favourite, Kaleidoscope. Although starting favourite he was among the field for the Derby, won by Kisbér and Forerunner (b c 1873 The Earl or The Palmer). He then won the Prince Of Wales's Stakes by a length, beating Great Tom (ch c 1873 King Tom) whilst giving him 12 lb, and Julius Caesar. He was 4° and last for the Ascot Biennial Stakes, won by Coltness (b c 1873 King Tom) and King Death (ch c 1873 King Tom). Next he finished 3° of 4 for the Ascot Triennial Stakes, won by Morning Star (b c 1873 Parmesan) and Correggio (br c 1873 Parmesan). In his last outing of the year he won the St Leger by a neck, beating the French-bred Wild Tommy (b c 1873 King Tom) and Julius Caesar. Also among the field were Kisbér and Coltness.

In 1877, running for Lord Lonsdale, carrying 8st 13l he was unplaced for the Lincolnshire Handicap, won by the Coronation Stakes winner Footstep (ch f 1873 See Saw) who got 23lb, and Poursuivant (b c 1872 Lord Lyon). Next he walked over for a Sweepstakes at Newmarket. Then, carrying 8st 12lb he won the High-Level Handicap at Epsom, beating the French-bred Rabagas (b c 1872 Ruy Blas) and the Ebor Handicap winner Lilian (b f 1869 Wingrave). He also won the Ascot Gold Cup by a length, beating the Queen's Vase winner Skylark (b c 1873 King Tom) and the Chesterfield Cup winner Coomassie (b f 1872 King Tom or North Lincoln). He then finished 2°for the Liverpool Summer Cup, beaten a head by The Snail (br c 1870 Esca) who got 19lb, and Advance (b g 1873 Speculum). Petrarch "lost ground by jumping a path close to home". In his last race of the year he was unplaced for the Goodwood Cup, won by Hampton (b c 1872 Lord Clifden) and Skylark.

In 1878 he was unplaced for the City And Suburban carrying 9st 4lb, won by Sefton (b c 1875 Speculum) carrying 5st 8lb, and Advance. He then won the Rous Memorial at Ascot, beating the 1875 City And Suburban winner Dalham (br c 1871) and Touchet (br c 1874 Lord Lyon). In his final race, running for Lord Calthorpe, he was unplaced for the Champion Stakes, won by Jannette (b f 1878 Lord Clifden) and Silvio (b c 1874 Blair Athol).

Petrarch retired to Bushy Paddocks at Hampton Court and covered for a fee of 100 guineas along with Springfield (b c 1873 St. Albans) whose fee was the same. In 1882 he moved to Lanwades Stud, near Newmarket, for a fee of 50 guineas which was back to 100 guineas in 1886. In the stud got a number of good horses, the best of whom was doubtlessly The Bard.
 

The Bard (1883)
 
The Lombard (1892)
 
The Bard (ch c 1883), owned by General Owen Williams and Robert Peck, won 22 races and finished 2° twice earning about 12,000 guineas for 25 races. As a two year old he was undefeated 16 consecutive times and as a three year old he ran 2° to the mighty Ormonde for the Derby before winning the Doncaster and Goodwood Cups. With both speed and staying power he was also remembered for his gameness and ability to carry weight. He was said to stand anywhere from barely 15 hands to 15.3 and noted for the Birdcatcher ticks throughout his coat. He was sold to Henri Say for 10,000 guineas and sent to his Lormoy Stud in 1887. He got numerous good horses including the the Prix Du Jockey Club winner Saxon (ch c 1898) and was a leading sire in France in 1894 and 1901.

Laureate (ch c 1886) won the Cambridgeshire and Royal Hunt Cup and got a Stewards' Cup winner in Northern Farmer (b c 1894). Hackler (b c 1887) was a champion sire in Ireland in 1900, 1901, 1902 and 1906 and also a highly regarded jumper sire. The Lombard (b c 1892) was a stallion in Austria-Hungary.
 

Busybody (1881)
 
Throstle (1891)
 
Petrarch's daughters did equally well. Busybody (b f 1881) won the 1000 Guineas and the Oaks Stakes, then got Meddler (b c 1890 St. Gatien) who won the Dewhurst Stakes and became a leading sire in America in 1904 and 1906. Poetry (b f 1881) became the dam of the 1000 Guineas winner Thais (br f 1893 St. Serf). Italy (b f 1882) won the Magyar Kancadij (Hungarian Oaks). Miss Jummy (b f 1883) won the 1000 Guineas and Oaks, and not least, Throstle (b f 1891) won the St Leger and became the dam of Missel Thrush (br c 1897 Orme).

In 1893 Petrarch was purchased by Comte De Saint-Phalle for 820 guineas and scheduled to stand in France in 1894 for a fee of 2,000 french francs. In 1894 Vicomte D'Harcourt purchased a half-share and Petrarch moved to the Haras De Saint Georges. He died there in 1895.
 
 
 
© 1996-2008 Thoroughbred Bloodlines. © 1999-2008 DigiGrate LLC.


A   B   C   D   EF   G   H   IJK   L   M   NO   P   QR   S   T   UV   W   XYZ
Family Numbers    Sire Lines    Breeders    As It Were    Genealogy
Home    Contact Us   FAQ    Links    Race Results    Archives